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EricSan

Field dressing tips?

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catman71

that is a good technique, but I will only remember the "bingo hole"!!!

that is funny.....

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Gadgetman

Ditto on exedges technique. I no longer have a sore hand from pounding on the butt of my knife, and a lot less grass and leaves get on the meat and the legs dont flop around as much when draging out. Every body I have showed how to do it is amazed at how clean and easy it is

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Fishook

What is the scoop on washing or rinsing out the deer cavity? I have read where several of you do this but for some reason I thought washing/rinsing with water was not the right thing to do as it promoted bacterial growth or something like that. Any other thoughts on this?

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BobT

I would say it's more likely the opposite. Not cleaning the cavity is more likely to encourage bacterial growth and faster spoilage. Most important is to cool the body down to about 35-40 degrees. If possible, aging for 10 days or so would be great but you have to have a controlled environment and some means to keep it from drying out since it's best to skin it as soon as possible.

Bob

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chucker34

I don't split the deer's pelvis for the reasons most have mentioned. Plus its easier not too. I also have heard from some that you must split the upper rib cage to allow for better air movement but I do not do this. I do rinse the deer out thoroughy with water as soon as I get home. I think the key is to not let the water pool up. You need to hang it so everything drips out.

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xedge2002

We do the same thing. As soon as we get them back to the shed they get hung up and we wash the cavity out with a 5 gallon bucket of water then put a stick or something in the chest to open it up to allow more air to move through it.

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snapcrackpop

I think it is best to wash out the abdominal and pelvic cavities with water right away.

I read earlier that you don't want to wash/rinse the meat(butchered).

Maybe that's what you are referring too.

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Fishook

What you say makes sense. I know for a fact you do not want to lay wet, boned deer meat (to take to the locker or to process at a later date) in layers in a cooler, bags, etc. because it will rot. We hang our field dressed deer with the head/rack up, skin them 24 hours later, then butcher/bone after hanging another 48 hours. I always felt there was a lining in the cavity that would protect the meat prior to butchering so we have only cleaned the cavity if the deer was gut shot or had a break in the bowels. We have had good luck with this approach and always make sure they cool down and stay cool.

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Guest

Why is everyone hanging their deer for so long? They dont marbelize like beef. In my experience, they just get more gamey the longer they hang.

I process my deer about the time they are done twitching.. that translates to as soon as I get home and eat a meal.

Venison taste much better when they are butchered immediately. Even in deer camp, its a good idea to skin them and quarter them out and get them in a cooler.

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Canuck

The best teacher is just get in there and do it.

Lots of good sugguestion in this thread. Myself I do not split the pelvis and have found that U can most of the time just use your fingers to break the tissue away from the bone.

A couple of other hints that I do are:

(1) take your paper towel out of your pack BEFORE U start to field dress your deer (that keeps your pocket cleaner and it is biodegradable)

(2) once U have the bunge hole reemed out situtate the deer on its back with the rear end facing down hill.

(3) I also cut some fresh green spruce bows and lay them beside the deer on top of the snow. I find this seems to keep alot of the blood from getting on my boots.

(4) if the temp is real cold and in rifle season it usually is I actually start a small fire before starting field dressing the deer, it sure helps to warm the hands back up after the job is done and U are cleaning your knife. Your hands do not get cold while inside the deer but it is the cleaning up that gets cool.

(5) I carry a Gerber folding saw (there are others out there just as good) to split the ribs.

(6) A good gut hook will help U open the belly without puncturing the stomach while first learning but the sugguestion of the 2 fingers is a good one that really works.

I do not know for sure about the diaphram but take it out as I was told it can spoil the neck meat and the neck makes great stew meat and/or roast.

Good luck and don't worry it will work out and congrats on your deer.

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