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korn_fish

Bringing home a new pup - 5 hour drive

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korn_fish

In Mid-November, I will be bringing home a new GSP pup. All my previous pups were quick 30 minute drives or less and the pup rode in the cab in a persons lap.

What does everyone else do or recommend on the proper method to bring the pup home?

Reason I ask is that all my other dogs, when they rode in the cab, wnated to be on my lap. And also, they always wanted to jump in the cab when someone opened the door. I think that first trip home might have been a start to that behavior. I want to make sure I do this right this time.

Thanks

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LABS4ME

I've flown 2 pups home and drove one home on a 14 hour trip.... I always use a puppy crate. Couple breaks for potty, and water and fun time and it's lights out back in the crate. They are generally good to go for a couple hours or so. The Air Marshalls didn't think it was a cute idea for me to give my puppy one last break in the concourse before we boarded the plane. I had quite the crowd gathered to see this 8 week old fur ball and boy did he end that in a hurry! ooo.gif killjoy! hehehe She slept in her crate stowed under the seat the entire 2+ hour flight home... never made a peep.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Blaze

When I picked up all 3 of my dogs, they've all ridden on the front seat of my truck with me, snoozin' the whole way. When I picked up my current pup in SD (6hr+ drive), I put his crate on the front seat with the open door facing me. He slept half the ride in his kennel and half on the seat with his head in my lap. Nice opportunity to start building the bond, IMO.

Little dog=little bladder, tho. Stop early, stop often. wink.gif

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Swamp Scooter

Just crate and go. Stop maybe once and see if they want water or a little food. Not too much food or they may get carsick. They will sleep most if not all the way.

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OUTDOORNUT

I'm with Blaze here. I picked mine up and it rode sleeping next to my leg in the cab. When she got up and started sniffing, pull over let her run, use the outdoor facilities, and she fell right back asleep again. Our 7 hour trip consisted of 5 stops on the way back. Three of them were for gas, food, etc.

Throw a couple old towels or blankets down just incase, and you'll be fine.

You can't start the bonding process soon enough....

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Powerstroke

I had a 1hr drive home and my puppy was a bundle of energy. He wanted to be everyone in the car. I confined him to the front seat so he could see me and I tried to get him to lay down but he wanted to be in my lap standing up.

You might as well bring the kennel along. Its good training and its safer.

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colonel42

Your taking the pup away from its brothers and sisters and also it mommy. Let it sit in the front and learn who it's new master is. Spoil it!!!! Soon enough the work will begin.

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LMITOUT

5 hours?? That's nothing! grin.gif

I had a 6+ hour trip home after I picked up my new GSP pup a few years ago. As much as she whined and cried after leaving the breeder, I was dreading the drive back the following day after staying at my parents for the night.

I left their house around 2pm figuring getting back here around 8-ish until I ran into a blizzard near Alexandria. I didn't get to Hutchinson until after midnight! Thankfully she slept the entire time in her kennel which I had in the extended cab behind me and would just whimper when she needed to use the bathroom. I was very happy about this as I didn't have the nerves left to clean up after the dog every hundred miles or so.

I kept the radio to a low level and just kept driving along hoping to not find the ditch. A long night indeed. The best part is after getting home and taking a deep breath after fighting the roads, the dog decided she wasn't happy with her new home and cried all night when I was completely whipped. Needless to say I never made it to work the next day.

New pups are great!

grin.gif

Good luck with yours. I'd suggest bringing her home in the kennel. The last thing you want to do is try to wrangle a pup while driving. Plus, when they are free to roam their bladders are a little more 'free' as well. They won't soil their bed so if you're lucky it'll let you know and you can get to the nearest turnoff in time.

Holly10weeks.jpg

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311Hemi

We had our lab in our lap in the front seat for the two hour drive home and will do it again.

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bigdog

I take a small crate with but always end up with the little devil sleeping in my lap. Good chance to start building the relationship.

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Lund4ver

I have borught home many puppies, and have always had them crated, just so they get used to riding in the kennel, as I feel it is safer for not only me, but the dog as well. Just make some stops along the way, and the ride home shouldn't be that bad.

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