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Hedman

River Fishing

Question

Hedman

What do you people use to catch Cats and Walleyes off shore in Rivers without gettting snagged up. Every time I try to fish the Minnesota River im usually tying a new hook on for more than half the time because of a snag. Any Info will help.

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ChemE

Post this question in the Catfish forum. There are many helpful people there who will be able to steer you in the right direction. In my experience, I seem to find the cats near things that cause snags so that is where I let my bait sit. However, I find that longer leaders on a slip sinker rig in heavy current tend to increase my snag chances. Also, a sinker that is too light for the current can sometimes lead to a snag. Lively bait (which is good for hungery flats) can also get itself tangled. For me, shorter leaders and 65 - 90 lb test Power Pro line are usually enough to avoid or reduce the losses caused by snags. Good luck!

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Lunker

Well, be sure to be casting downstream first of all. When catfishing(i dont do much) you gotta have enough weight to keep it down. When I fish the rivers, I usually try to use light enough weight(jigs) to keep it just off the bottom, and moving around the current breaks, but then again I'm not usually fishing cats. Also, with the lighter jigs you generally get lighter hooks that you can straigten out with heavy enough line(10lb mono usually does it for me) so you keep your rigs after a little rebending. Those are a couple of my tricks

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Ralph Wiggum

You have to make sure that your sinker is heavy enough that your bait sticks to the bottom, or you're going to get snagged up a lot. Snags will still happen, but not as much. It might take a 5-6 ounce no-roll sinker to hold to the bottom if the current is really ripping.

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Joe
      The Walleyes are in their full summer patterns now. Our Leech Lake Fishing Guides are finding the walleyes in a few different places using a few different techniques. The key times of the day are the low light periods which has been an important factor for catching these fish on calm sunny days.   Trolling the flats has put mid summer Leech Lake Walleyes in the boat. The main idea here is to cover ground using crank baits and find the active fish. Aim to move the boat at about 2 mph and getting your lure of choice within 2 feet of the bottom. Don’t spend too much time on on spot even if you are marking fish. Our Leech Lake walleye guides have had the best luck running # 5 Rapalas in the bleeding copper flash or bleeding hot olive color. If you are finding the fish a little deeper switch up to a #7 to keep that lure in the strike zone.   When using this method be sure and target the flats where there is weed and gravel mixed in. Duck point and goose island are great spots to start when pulling these cranks. 9 to 12 feet of water has been the most productive area for us. The other technique that has put walleyes in the boat is lindy rigs and moving slowly on or near break lines. Walker Bay has plenty of structure for this method and we have been focusing on the south end. Leeches and crawlers have been working the best in the 10-16 feet of water range. With the crawler a green or brown floating jig has worked well. Try to keep the boat moving under 1 mph and closer to .5 the better.   Have fun.... Leech Lake Guide Service
    • Joe
      The Walleyes are in their full summer patterns now. Our Leech Lake Fishing Guides are finding the walleyes in a few different places using a few different techniques. The key times of the day are the low light periods which has been an important factor for catching these fish on calm sunny days.   Trolling the flats has put mid summer Leech Lake Walleyes in the boat. The main idea here is to cover ground using crank baits and find the active fish. Aim to move the boat at about 2 mph and getting your lure of choice within 2 feet of the bottom. Don’t spend too much time on on spot even if you are marking fish. Our Leech Lake walleye guides have had the best luck running # 5 Rapalas in the bleeding copper flash or bleeding hot olive color. If you are finding the fish a little deeper switch up to a #7 to keep that lure in the strike zone.   When using this method be sure and target the flats where there is weed and gravel mixed in. Duck point and goose island are great spots to start when pulling these cranks. 9 to 12 feet of water has been the most productive area for us. The other technique that has put walleyes in the boat is lindy rigs and moving slowly on or near break lines. Walker Bay has plenty of structure for this method and we have been focusing on the south end. Leeches and crawlers have been working the best in the 10-16 feet of water range. With the crawler a green or brown floating jig has worked well. Try to keep the boat moving under 1 mph and closer to .5 the better.   Have fun.... Leech Lake Guide Service
    • BirchPtMike
      I only fish the east end ,but your deeper idea is correct. Fish are running 25-35.  Crank baits are best right now ,but rigs were getting them this AM. Might want to run bottom bouncers and spinners with a crawler. Every day is different lately so keep looking. Good Luck
    • Muskies
      It was a beauty...20” long and would guess 4 1/2+lbs. It was released right after the picture. My wife caught that one In late May in 10 feet of water.
    • Wakemupwalleye
      Any help on the walleyes would be great. Been up here a week and caught my share of 13 and below but just can’t get on anything with size. Quite honestly not marking anything. Feel like I’ve tried everywhere. Have they gone deeper? I’ve been fishing reefs that normally hold fish. I’m on the west end but will fish anywhere 
    • gimruis
      Went dock skipping again yesterday with a friend near Zimmerman and it was still effective.  Chartreuse with black flake has been the go-to color in that murky water.
    • Better Than Working!
      How big is the first one? That is a mighty fine looking fish! I am jealous!
    • monstermoose78
    • Muskies
      I have to agree with everyone. Up on rainy lake, the bass have been bitting...here’s a few pics...
    • jigginjim
      Try walking the west side, if you can get a float tube you will have the whole lake to access. Jigs with swimbaits, twisters or crankbaits, jerkbaits work well.  now the you it's summer, frog type surface baits will get you some large bass or even a muskie.  Sorry, I  have been guiding, not watching the network.  
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