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sdstate

Personal Goals

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Eric Wettschreck

I had the opportunity to hunt with Rick and his dog yesterday.

My personal goal has changed a little bit. Not only do I want to get my GSP more experience in the field, I want him to work like Rick's dog did.

Big goal to say the least.

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riverrat56

In response to a previous post about why set goals, because then it gives me something to shoot for, whether or not I make my goal of 15 birds I don't really care, but I find it fun to keep track of how many birds I've shot. If you don't care how many you shot than don't care, I wish I could shoot 70 birds a year, pheasant hunting is in my blood and there is nothing I would rather do. Just because I set a goal on how many I want to shoot doesn't mean killing a bird is my only goal, spending time outdoors and watching my dog work is something that I treasure, but I'd be lying to you if I didn't say I hunt to kill pheasants. If you are going to hunt then that is your ultimate goal, to kill something, if it isn't then just put down the gun and pick up a camera because you'd be doing the same thing.

Now I know that will tick some of you off but its my opinion that if its legal and someone wants to do it then let them, ethics aren't universal, they are up to the individual person.

Riverrat

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sdstate

The post about the perch makes no sense. Since roosters are extremely polygamous, it only takes a few roosters to breed a heck load of hens. ANd its not like im taking all the roosters off of one area, if i hit a spot i usually dont visit it for awhile. ANd another reason is, is becasue when perch are biting good, everyone in thecountry can catch em and they usually do. Most of the time you have to work a little harder for a limit of roosters. Just my .02 cents

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grab the net

I think you should post pictures of you and all your birds. Then we would all know how close you are to "THE GOAL"

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sdstate

I didnt say that you had to believe me and if you dont want to that is fine with me. If i could take pics of all my birds i would, but wen you hunt alone alot it is kind of difficult. And this post has definately went the wrong way. I didnt post this idea to start an argument, i just wanted to know how everyone else was doing.

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ATM

sdstate, I will be hunting out that way the weekend after thanksgiving. My wife is from wilmot so i spend quite a bit of time in the area. Back to the goals my goal is to not a bird number but a days out number I would like to hunt 45 days of the season that is 15 a mnth .I have a 3 year old english pointer who i feel i owe it to, to get in the field. To do this I will hunt some mornings before work as i work from 2pm to 11pm. As far as your goal of 70 good luck. I know when the birds bunch up in the sloughs near wilmot it seems like that would be an easy number. Adam

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Ufatz

Rick, your statement that "....ethics aren't universal, they are up to the individual person." is troubling. I don't mean to get heavily involved here, but a lack of ethics ,of any kind ,is part is leading to a great deal of the trouble this country faces today. If we continue to follow your apparent belief, that ethics are 'up to the individual person' where will that lead us. We ALL have the obligation to conduct ourselves "ethically" (look up the word.) A country where the ethical standards are left up to the individual is bound for anarchy.

Just thought I'd toss that in.

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james_walleye

I think all he is trying too say that some peoples beliefs say its ok too go all out on what game laws say you can do, and some people set their own game laws. One guy might think its ok too keep a 25" walleye because the law says you can keep one but the next guy believes all walleyes over 20" should go back no matter what. One guy will shoot the first buck that comes by and the next guy will only shoot a buck if its an 8-pointer and even with the ears. One guy will shoot his limit of pheasants 5 times a week and the next thinks its right too do it twice a week. Thats what he means by own personal ethics.

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CaptainMusky

Yeah, you are right. Perch mate for life. LOL

I was using it to state a point, not make a direct correlation. Point is, just because you CAN shoot 70 birds and fill everyone else's freezer (which I don't believe is ethical) doesn't mean you should and it could have a direct impact on the resource.

One person alone could not decimate the population, but if you have many people that have the same thoughts that "I can't hurt it or I am hunting all over the state" it will. My goal is to get my son exposed to pheasant hunting and my new pup on some wild birds. I took my 4 yr old son hunting for the first time last Saturday so that goal has been partially accomplished. No wild birds for the new pup yet, the old ones keep getting them first! I go out to watch the dogs hunt and see birds. If I bag something great.

This is turning into a lecture, but I think you understand that point others are trying to make by the statement you made about goals.

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CodyDawg

You know I have read this whole thread and I have a few comments. How many of you who do not set goals keep track of each and every bird you shoot? By setting a goal and keeping track of it, I feel I honor the birds I shoot rather than just throwing them in the back of the truck and forgeting about them. I have a personal goal, set before the season. Whether I achieve it or not is irrelevent. I use the season prognosis and my own personal situation to set it. This year it is less than years past because of my new pup. To have a goal of getting my pup out is rediculous, because i know that will happen. I, and many others, are not #s guys, but rather guys who like to keep track of birds we shoot. I track where, when, snow cover, # of shots to bag the bird, who was with me, what dog was with me, wind, sky, temp etc. of every bird. It is fun to look back and relive each bird. I also can then track # of birds off of each place I hunt and see how habitat changes affect the # of birds I get.

To those of you who shoot a lot of birds per year....i suspect you are a lot like me and value them all. The guys who are only out to kill things just dont have the staying power and the dedication to shoot 70 per year. You cannot hunt roosters below the # needed for reproduction, so it has minimal affect on the population (only the ones you actually harvest). All of the people I share my birds with do not have a chance to get them any other way, so I dont think the term "filling everyone's freezer" applies.

As for ethics, I fully believe there are many ethics that are solely an individual's and others that are universal. The analogy of keeping a 25" walleye is a great example of an individual ethic. Shooting a hen is universally considered unethical. Just my .02.

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CaptainMusky

Shooting a hen isn't unethical, it is ILLEGAL in MN!

I am sure that when you "gift" out your pheasants that all of the required information as defined in the Hunting Regulations is retained with the gift, right?

This topic could go round and round and there will be no general consensus.

"You cannot hunt roosters below the # needed for reproduction, so it has minimal affect on the population (only the ones you actually harvest)." Based on data I was privvy to the in the late 80's I believe this to be an inaccurate statement. In a study conducted by Nebraska Fish and Game they determined that within the pheasant range of their state that in upwards of 15% of the hen population in a given year did not reproduce due to lack of roosters. It has been proven that a ratio of 7 hens to 1 rooster is optimum for reproduction, their studies showed that were not enough viable roosters to carry out all of the reproduction. I believe over-hunting roosters CAN have an impact on reproduction. To what extent? Not sure, but the study I referenced was convincing and was against everything I previously had thought.

15% of the population may not seem like much, but when you think that there will be 10 to 12 chicks per brood (of which half may make it) and possible second broods it adds up in a hurry.

As for goals, ask Wilt Chamberlain if he remembers each and every one of the 10,000 women he slept with. He had lofty goals and I doubt any one of them meant anything to him. grin.gifwink.gif

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CodyDawg

Quote:

Shooting a hen isn't unethical, it is ILLEGAL in MN!

>> Really? Thanks for pointing that out.

I am sure that when you "gift" out your pheasants that all of the required information as defined in the Hunting Regulations is retained with the gift, right?

>>Heckifino if it is retained. It is given with it. I assume you have a point here? Are you trying to suggest that gifting wild game is unethical? Good luck with that if you are.

This topic could go round and round and there will be no general consensus.

"You cannot hunt roosters below the # needed for reproduction, so it has minimal affect on the population (only the ones you actually harvest)." Based on data I was privvy to the in the late 80's I believe this to be an inaccurate statement. In a study conducted by Nebraska Fish and Game they determined that within the pheasant range of their state that in upwards of 15% of the hen population in a given year did not reproduce due to lack of roosters. It has been proven that a ratio of 7 hens to 1 rooster is optimum for reproduction, their studies showed that were not enough viable roosters to carry out all of the reproduction. I believe over-hunting roosters CAN have an impact on reproduction. To what extent? Not sure, but the study I referenced was convincing and was against everything I previously had thought.

15% of the population may not seem like much, but when you think that there will be 10 to 12 chicks per brood (of which half may make it) and possible second broods it adds up in a hurry.

>>The studies I have seen have said 15 hens per rooster is the optimum number, and it is next to impossible to hunt them below that point. I believe the "second brood" is a myth. If they pull off a brood, they do not renest a second time.

As for goals, ask Wilt Chamberlain if he remembers each and every one of the 10,000 women he slept with. He had lofty goals and I doubt any one of them meant anything to him.
grin.gifwink.gif


>>Great analogy I think not.

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lawdog

This horse was dead a long time ago...

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CaptainMusky

Maybe it is my age, but I don't recall much of anything from each of the birds I shoot at year end, much less years later. Sure there are ones that are significant for one reason or another, but to say that setting goals and keeping track of the number means I remember them or pay homage to them in some way would be a huge stretch. That's just me, like I said, probably a memory thing. We each have our reasons for chasing ringnecks. I guess if someone does it to put another notch in their belt, so be it, for me it is the thrill of the chase, watching a good dog and having the hours of training pay off with a succesful point and subsequent retrieve to hand. If I end up with an empty bag at the end of the day, it isn't a disappointment, the birds won that day.

Sorry you didn't appreciate the sarcasm in my analogy. I had a good kick out of writing it.

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Mr. B

Maggie and I surpassed my goals for the season this evening. We went out for a quick hunt and not only got our first wild rooster but we managed to get two.

From here on everything else is just a bonus.

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LuciandTim

Blah..Blah ..Blah..

Anyways....I have never set a goal for the season. I have never set a goal for any hunting or fishing season. I have hopes and dreams but that is it. This year however after reading one of CodyDawg's post about goals..I decided to set a goal of 20 Roosters.

I set the goal for fun, nothing more. I think the real goal is to get out as much as possible!! I want to hunt everyday. I am a pheasant fanatic. As for my birds....every single one of them whether I shot it or someone else in my party shot it has a place in my hunting journal! When i'm an old man and can't hunt anymore I want to relive every hunt that I have ever been on. I also include a picture from each hunt. This stuff means more to me then goals, limits, and whatever else you all want to bicker over. Pheasants...... grin.gif

Idea!

I have a goal for all you Pheasant Hunters on here..

Log onto the Pheasants Forever website and become a member if you aren't already.

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riverrat56

Thank you james_walleye for interpreting my stament the right way.

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Mr.Seaguar

I`d like to say 70 birds, or start my child on hunting, or new dog. But really I just want to go twice as much and get yelled at half as much. Not exactly on track as yet.

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CaptainMusky

AWESOME! I will be chasing bambi this weekend so I have a one week hiatus for bird hunting. I hope to hit it really hard for the rest of the season. Low expectations considering the new pup and all, but it will be very rewarding seeing him grow.

Is it normal for a GSP to be 40# at barely 4 mos? shocked.gif

I should rename him to thumper! Biggest GSP pup I have had to date. I am excited to see what he will be like a year from now.

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sdstate

Same with me i will also be chasing the big brown things this weekend. I will tell u this much it is going to be a bad weekend for the dogs. They see u getting dressed up in orange and putting your guns in the cases and they sure get fired up. Then you have to put them in the kennal and they are sure bummed.

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bigeyes

I have a GSP right around 100 and he is vet definition of healthy. His dad is about 115 with muscle straps running down his chest and legs like you have never seen. Really are great dogs, it always impresses me how quick they pick up on things and how easy it all comes to them. Sure is fun to watch a pointing dog work.

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BLACKJACK

Its always interesting to see the differences of opinion on forums like this. The guys that get out hunting a lot think its ok to shoot lots of birds and the guys that don't get out much condemn them. Back in my younger days in the late 80's, I had lots of private CRP land to hunt down by Rochester, my work hours allowed me to get out every evening at prime time, and I had two labs, so my goal was to have 28 birds in the bag after two weeks of the season and a 60 bird years were common. And yes I ate LOTS of pheasants, I burnt my wife out on pheasants in mushroom soup. My feeling is that if people get out a lot, go ahead and have fun and shoot some birds.

Now a days my goal is to just to get out and watch the dogs work, its a joy watching the enthusiasm of my labs, but I also like to shoot a bird now and then, its nice to get into an area with birds, 'hunted too hard public land' gets old after awhile. I've also had the opportunity to hunt SoDak the last few years where lots of birds are seen and shot, so my blood lust has been satisfied, so I can enjoy the hunt and dog action here in MN.

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MikeYager - Suzuki

My goal this year was to get a pheasant mounted. Goal accomplished. I got a rooster in Iowa with over 24" tail. Got it to the taxidermest the same day I shot it and it was in great condition.

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LuciandTim

Just reading all of this and I was thinking....In regards to seeing your dogs work, which to me is the best part about Pheasant hunting....Some said they don't care if they shoot a bird or not.

Does your dog feel the same way???

And another opinion here: I just spent a couple days in my favorite pheasant hunting area and I saw so many birds that I couldn't believe it. We had our limit by 1pm and were flushing birds walking back to the car. Now if I lived in the area I would be hunting any chance I had. And if I did that i'm sure I would shoot a lot of birds also like some of the above mentioned. If you have the chance get out there and kill some pheasants....man its looking great this year!

grin.gif

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ATM

LuciandTim, Sounds like you had a good time. If you hunted the 3 counties u mentioned in a previous post, I have also been seeing alot of birds in the area. Unfortanately my pointer recieved a large cut to his eyeball last time out so we will be taking a little time off. I will be hunting that area for 4 days after thanksgiving if u would like to meet up for some hunting. Adam

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LuciandTim

Would love to meet up, I took that weekend off. I actually hunted farther south by Slayton, and hit Rock County and part of Nobles. I had a blast, just a little far to do everyweekend.

Shoot me an e-mail and we'll talk about it...

[email protected]

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CaptainMusky

Those are some HUGE GSP's! Chester is now 45#'s and cut and only 4 months. I think he will be a giant. I am excited. I love having a bigger dog because they work the thick cover so much better.

That was an interesting question luciandtom about does the dog feel the same way. I know there were many times where my dog worked hard for a bird, pointed it and an awesome flush only to have the master miss horribly. He just stood there and looked at my like, man, I just busted my (Contact US Regarding This Word) and nothing in return! There is a reward for them when you bag a bird and I can definitely see disappointment when an opportunity is missed.

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Mr. B

I am not sure about the disappointment when a bird is missed and my lab knows all about me missing birds. The only time she seems disappointed is when we have to leave or we do not go.

Can a dog tell when it is time to go hunting? And I do not mean from seeing people getting ready to go hunting. I have been trying to get out every Tuesday and Thursday after work for an hour. Due to things at home this week I have not been able to.

The last two nights Maggie has almost seemed depressed, laying around and just not acting her usual self. Until I told her to go and get her ball. After an hour of playing in the house lastnight (If you ever want permission to take your dog hunting start tossing the ball around inside at 9 pm. My wife told me if I do not take Maggie hunting and wear her out I was in big trouble.) she was back to normal.

Captain, I have never hunted behind a large dog, how do they work thick cover better? I am just curious, does size matter how they work cover?

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CaptainMusky

I have had GSP's ranging in size from 45# to 80# and had a couple springers in the under 40# category. It may not be fair to compare different breeds and each dog is different, but the larger GSP's were able to bust through the cattails and brush where the springers had trouble with the thicker cover.

Just my experience. I know some people like smaller dogs for cattails because at times they can burrow under the cattails. As long as the dog is not overweight, I prefer a larger dog and they seem to have better stamina and don't get worn down in the thickest cover.

Bigger dogs are more prone to health problems with joints and such, but they seem to hold up better hunting for me anyways.

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bigeyes

Mr. B I am not sure if a bigger dog actually works thick cover better or not, but it kinda seems like they would have an easier time busting though. I really don't hunt with a small dog much other than a friends 40# English pointer he is kinda cute when he gets in weeds taller than him(which doesn't take much) he stops about every 20 ft and stands on his hind legs like a praire dog trying to look around, then back to work. My dog is tall with long legs and a lot of clearence(friends call him a pony), he can simple trot though/over stuff a smaller dog might have to be constanly leaping over. I have a neighbor with a 25# springer(maybe 6-10" of clearence) I honestly have never seen her hunt, but can't imagine how she would every make it in thick tall stuff very long.

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