• RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
ricqik

Legal distance??

Recommended Posts

ricqik

I read and reread the regulation book and no where did it mention the allowable archery hunting distance from a dwelling. Firearm is 500' but no mention for archery. Does that mean I can sit in the tree just 40yds away from a house? It's a real productive spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jeff127

With the owner of the dwellings permission, it should be no problem.

jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ricqik

The tree is on public, it's actually a roll of tree's on the boundry between his lawn and the WMA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lawdog

I'd say its fair game. Even the 500' with a firearm is not a hard rule. If you had permission from the homeowner to sit in that tree and shoot you could...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WalleyeWeasel

There are thousands of acres to hunt in Mn. Please don't go into someones backyard, within sight of the homeowner and wait for a deer to eat out of their garden (unless they don't mind). This is NOT hunting and you are probably just looking for trouble.

Go INTO the woods and enjoy what hunting is all about !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ricqik

You're probably right about being too close even though it's legal. This has nothing to do with shooting a deer from their garden or side of the property. Just because one sit's next to the border doesn't mean it's not hunting. I've hunted this area for years and scouted and watched deers movement while hunting and have come to a decision of if it was legal to sit there or not. I've watch as deer after deer even bruisers walk by this woodline. About garden hunting, wouldn't hunting next to a crop field such as corn, bean, alfalfa be the same? You're still hunting off a food source that is planted by man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WalleyeWeasel

The way it sounded to me was that you were going to hunt right on the edge of their yard or something. What i meant was not to hunt within view of someones house. Figure out where they are entering this area and get in the woods a little ways, there has got to be trails the deer are using to access this area. Good luck !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ricqik

Sorry to sound that way. 40yds was just an exapmle. I wouldn't sit in a tree that is in plain view from his windows, it's just not comfortable for me. I may even go ground blind just to stay out of his view. There's some pretty thick undergrowth and brushes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chucker34

The fact that you're asking other people their opinion tells me you must be fairly responsible and considerate of others.

I'm not sure about if it is legal to be that close with a bow but if it is and this guy is cool with it, I'd say hunt the spot as long as you are safe an not shooting toward the house. I'd feel differently if you were using a gun, obviously.

As far as that not being hunting, I'd disagree. To each their own I guess. But you're not shooting at a penned deer. The deer is free to roam wherever he wants and still has to come by your stand. And you still have to make yourself undetected and then make a good shot. Just because there's a house or cabin nearby doesn't make the deer any less wild or a "tame" or a domesticated animal. There are plenty of people who bowhunt metro zones every year that would make the same arguement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scoot

I agree with chucker. Also, I'd agree with past comments- ask for the guys permission and make it clear that you will be safe and curtious and that you won't be on his land or in his yard. If he says no way, move further down the tree row and find a similar spot. Good luck and let us know if you stick a biggun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lawdog

Why ask this guy's permission? He chose to build next to public hunting ground, he can't control whether someone bow hunts in a WMA! I really don't agree with the need to even address this guy, other than obviously not endangering him/his family in any way with where you are shooting...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chucker34

If its public land, then he shouldn't have to, unless the 500 foot rule applies to bowhunting as well. Might be a nice courtesy to drop by sometime though and let the guy know he'll be there so they both feel more comfortable with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ricqik

I see a new house every year pop up that is being built around this WMA. Acouple of yrs ago I had to give up my most productive spot because someone decide to build their house just 15yds from the border. I'm quickly running out of funnel areas. I love bowhunting this area because there's no firearm deer hunting allowed. It won't be long before the State decides to close the area because of the houses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ozzie

the only problem i see is how weird would it be if you shoot the deer and it runs and dies on his lawn!! Sit there and gut it out in front of the family and neighbors... grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HateHumminbird

Tough situation, that, quite frankly I'm growing sick of.

Happens by me all the time. Hobby farms or small residential subdivisions make headway into the country, and can "control" (from a hunting perspective) many more acres yet. If you stick hard and fast to the 500' rule, someone who builds on the corner of a 3 acre property (often desirable locations near woods) can control nearly 14 acres in a 500' radius all around them! It's really ridiculous around us.

Then, if they know you're hunting, they run a leaf-blower, weed-whip, lawn-mower, wood-chipper, or chainsaw while you're out hunting. Who knows what that does to deer movement, especially in farm country, but it's mostly annoying knowing that they're really targeting you. Especially when they say so. Local enforcement can't charge a guy for mowing his lawn, and how do you prove it's hunter harassment?

Last deer season, new family moved adjacent to the family farm, and he proceeded to post "no hunting or trespassing" signs every 30 yards, pointing directly into our wooded land.....these are not even access points people! It's as if he were fearful we'd try to slug hunt in his putting green of a lawn, near the road, and his house! He then proceeds to walk his line every hour, on the hour, in brown carharrts no less, and a whitish-blue baseball cap! He lives near a crossing point, and there is no doubt in my mind he kept deer in the adjacent woodlot from crossing over to ours. Is that harassment or not?!?

Maybe I'm just growing tired and indignant of that kind of behavior, but I'm more and more taking the attitude of doing whichever is within my legal power to hunt the way I like. I will always give a landowner the benefit of the doubt, and try to stop and talk to him. But letting him flex the rules to prevent hunting in our adjacent 14 acres is ridiculous.

Sorry for the rant!

Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chucker34

jnelson. The law as I read it says you can't be within 500 feet of a dwelling when on public land or on another person's private property. I would take that to mean that if you were on your own property (even if within 500 feet of the neighbor's house), and not someone else's private property, you would be good to go. Of course, you still need to be safe and if you'd like, courteous.

As far as the other stuff goes, that sucks. Sounds like he's passive aggressive and doing what he can just short of being considered harassment. I would call the authorities if it becomes more blatant. Take heart in knowing that as long as there is habitat, the deer should adjust to the noise and movement of the extra people. Unless it gets out of control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • guideman
      It is much warmer now and after watching 30 ice outs on Vermilion, I think Pike bay will be ice free in about a week and Big bay typically follows about 10 days later.  Warm weather and wind can melt ice faster that you can believe. There might still be some ice floating around by the opener however I plan on going fishing like always. "Ace"  
    • guideman
      I know from living on Pike pay for 27 years that this will be one of the latest, if not the latest start dates that I have seen. Good news my neighbors boat lift broke though the ice today and that typically mean that Pike bay will be open within a week. ;) "Ace" ;) 
    • leech~~
      Smoken!
    • smurfy
      so eyeguy.......you keep them? picklin material???????? to many bones for anything else!!!!   nice pictures.!!!!! how many line tangles already!!!😄
    • eyeguy 54
      Hello thursday
    • Smoker2
    • maxpower117
      No wake is in effect currently and will be for the weekend opener.  Spread the word. 
    • Pat McGraw
      I wouldn't read too much into the open water in Oak Narrows. There's been open water there for more than a month. There's clearly forces other than air temps or sunshine at work there. With that said, considering the data shared by delcecchi, and the current 15-day forecast I am not without hope.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Enforcement Division has promoted four officers – Chelsie Leuthardt, Brandon McGaw, Jen Mueller and Brett Oberg – to the position of regional training officer. They’ve been in their new positions since April 18.  The Enforcement Division’s six regional training officers are responsible for training the state’s conservation officers on topics such as defensive tactics, firearms and use of force. In addition, they train and work closely with the 6,000 volunteers who are integral to delivering the division’s education and safety training program. (The largest number of volunteers, about 4,000, are firearms safety instructors.) Regional training officers also spend a portion of their time performing the traditional field duties of a conservation officer. Following are brief bios of the newly promoted officers: Chelsie Leuthardt has been a conservation officer for four years and most recently patrolled the White Bear Lake area. “I’ve made strong connections with many instructor groups and look forward to working with them more closely,” said Leuthardt, whose area includes the southeastern part of the state. “I enjoy working with our user groups and helping to form how we train our next generations of outdoor enthusiasts.” Brandon McGaw has been a conservation officer since 2007. For most of that time, he’s been stationed in the Mora area. He’s also been a Conservation Officer Academy instructor, field training officer, firearms instructor and use of force instructor. “I really love teaching,” said McGaw, whose area includes 10 counties north of the metro. “I enjoy connecting with the students as well as the older adults who take safety training courses.” Jen Mueller began her career as a conservation officer in the Hutchinson-West station in 2012. Mueller, who was promoted after serving as an acting regional training officer, said she learned quickly that participating in the Enforcement Division’s youth safety programs was one of her favorite parts of the job. “I’m amazed by our volunteer instructor groups and how passionate they are about what they’re teaching,” said Mueller, whose area includes the southwestern part of the state. “I also enjoy teaching our officers and helping them become better equipped to deal with situations they may face in the field.” Brett Oberg has been a conservation officer for 13 years and spent much of that time in the Hutchinson-East station. He’s also been an armorer, field training officer and use of force instructor. “I really enjoy training others and seeing youth get excited about the outdoors, especially firearms and hunting,” said Oberg, whose area includes the south metro and south-central part of the state. “I also enjoy teaching at the Conservation Officer Academy and helping the new recruits become conservation officers.” The four officers join Regional Training Officer Mike Lee, who covers the northeastern part of the state, and Acting Regional Training Officer Greg Oldakowski, who is responsible for the northwestern part of the state. Bruce Lawrence is the Enforcement Division’s statewide recreational vehicle coordinator. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Calves mark successful introduction of Theodore Roosevelt National Park herd genetics With new bison calves expected at Minneopa State Park in the coming weeks and months, managers with the Department of Natural Resources Parks and Trails division are reminding visitors to keep calves’ safety in mind by remaining in their vehicles along the park’s popular bison range road.  “The bison cows are incredibly protective of their calves, and it’s tempting for park visitors to get out of their vehicles to take photos,” said Parks and Trails area supervisor Craig Beckman. “However, it’s important for people to remember to stay in their vehicles for the safety of these calves, their mothers and other park visitors.” The new additions are offspring of the bison bull that was introduced in December 2016. That’s significant, Beckman said, because the bison bull comes from Theodore Roosevelt National Park and possesses a genetic line that’s not well represented in the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd. That genetic line will contribute to the herd’s overall genetic health and diversity. While Minneopa State Park is seeing its first successful additions to the herd, the bison herds at Blue Mounds State Park and the Minnesota Zoo are also seeing new calves this year. For visitors viewing the bison at state parks, patience can be rewarded. “Newborns need time for maternal bonding, and may be hard to see from the road for a while, but as they grow and mature, they become more visible,” Beckman said. “We tell visitors that they will be more likely to see the bison if they are patient and take it slow as they drive through the range.” Bison viewing tips: The bison drive begins near the campground off state Highway 68. A vehicle permit ($7/one-day or $35/year-round) is required to enter the park. Bison may be difficult to spot at times. Drive slowly and keep a watchful eye through the range. Remain inside vehicle while driving through the bison range. Bison should be given clearance of at least 75 feet from people and vehicles at all times. Dogs can make bison nervous, so pets must be kept on a leash while in the park and hiking around the bison range. Bison get nervous around loud noises or lots of activity, so keep voices down and movements to a minimum to help keep the bison within easy viewing. Hiking is not allowed inside the range, but there are hiking trails all the way around the outside of the range that can provide some fantastic views of the bison. The bison are part of the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd, managed through a formal agreement between the DNR and Minnesota Zoo. The partners are working together to preserve American plains bison and plan to grow the herd at several locations, including Blue Mounds and Minneopa state parks and the Minnesota Zoo. The goal is a 500-animal herd at multiple locations. Genetic testing of the herd from 2011 to 2014 found them largely free of any genetic material that would have come from cross-breeding with cattle. Less than 1 percent of all American plains bison tested so far have been found free of cattle genes. Visitors at Minneopa can check the park website for updates on the bison herd and its new calves at mndnr.gov/Minneopa. The site also provides more information about the park, including a virtual tour. Minneopa State Park is located off U.S. Highway 169 and state Highway 68, 5 miles west of Mankato. The bison range road is open Thursday through Tuesday each week from 9am to 3:30pm. For more information about the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd on the Minnesota Zoo website or visit mndnr.gov/bison. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.