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Getting a dog


tomahawk

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I am planning on getting a dog for hunting pheasants and dont know for sure what to get.One of my buddies has German Shorthairs.I really like hunting with them.any suggestions? confused.gifAnother guy I know has labs and he thinks they are pretty good but he uses them for duck hunting.I guess my question is which breed is the best for finding and retrieving phesants?

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My yellow lab is a firecracker in the pheasant field, loves to hunt and never stops. The bonus is that she likes to retrieve ducks as well. I may be biased, but labs are mt choice.

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Well this could get interesting. blush.gif

I think flushers are a more comfortable dog for many hunters because they stay (or should stay wink.gif) well within gun range and therefore are in site most of the time. They seem more managable for many hunters and are probably better suited for hunting in large groups. They are also good to excellent retrievers. I've seen good labs, goldens, and springers on pheasants. Of the 3 I like the field bred springers but that's just a personal preference. I just like the way they run and hunt better than the bigger retriever dogs.

Many like pointers because of the fun of the point and knowing that most of the time there's something in front of the dog. I think pointers work best if you hunt alone, and quietly and/or with 1 or 2 others. They do not work as well when hunting in large groups IMHO. If you like hunting with pointing dogs then I'd say go for it. For best bets I like GSP's. There are good wirehair lines out there too. Not that the other breeds are bad but I just think your odd's of getting a really good pheasant dog are higher with GSP's and GWP's. Again this is just personal preference and my own experiences, your mileage may vary with your own experiences.

If you want some GSP breeder references I'll be happy to point you to some resources and some breeders.

Also check out the Game Fair which is going on the next 2 weekends. Ask lots of questions. Be sure to weed out the BS because many are kennel blind, possibly including me grin.gif.

gspman

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I think the majority of hunters think that their dog is the best! The good news is that that will be you too! My experience is exactly what GSP said, large groups of hunters don't mix with some pointers. The hunt can get kind of out of hand, hunting too fast, and covering too much ground, basically a race. With those types of hunts I've seen many dogs (flushing and pointing, but especially pointing) racing too and next thing you know their busting birds at 100 yards plus. I'm a flushing guy myself and have had great luck with labs but I picked the pups from parents I hunted with a lot so I knew what I was getting. I'd have to say to figure out the hunting you do and then pick a dog you find attractive that fits your style of hunting and whether pointer or flusher you'll be happy. Either way, in my mind shooting one rooster with a dog, is better than shooting many birds without a dog, no matter what the type. All breeds can be great and all breed can stink, it's genetics and training that will make them great or bad. Pick wisely and patiently.

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If you’re interested in a pointer that can also retrieve ducks and geese, you should check out the German Wirehair Pointer. Great for upland and waterfowl, very versatile dogs.

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Well I am partial to labs only because I have one.

But my point I would like to share is this, make sure YOU are ready for the comitment of a dog.

Just getting a dog because your friends have one isn't a good idea, but if your sure you want one then keep in mind that it takes time to raise a dog just as it does kids.

You have to find a kennel or take the dog with where ever you go if your gone a lot.

There are vet bills, food bills, and training the dog to hunt takes a lot of your time as well.

Just be sure you want the dog first, then I would say look at the type of hunting you do most of.

If you hunt only upland then I would say look at the upland dog breeds like the pointers , the brittnys,the poodle(STANDARD) is a good upland dog as well.

Vesla's,short hairs,wire hairs, dharthars, and weinmaners are all good pointers.

If your into waterfowl your better off with a retriever that can take the cold water.

The flat coats,Chesies,Novia scothia trollers, American water spanials, the Goldens, and of coarse the labs.

Good luck with your future pet.

Benny

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I will not be hunting with large groups.Mostly me and my boy or just me. I will be hunting large pieces in Iowa most of the time and there are lots of running birds in them.I mostly want a dog that will get the downed birds.Can german shorthairs get the retreiving job done? Ive seen labs that cant find birds like a GSP and ive seen GSP's that cant pull a running cripple out of standing corn.Hard decision. If I were hunting ducks I would go with one of the retrieving breeds for sure but I will be hunting phesants only so Im leaning towards a pointer.

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I agree that everyone thinks their breed is the best. Pick a well bred litter from a reputable breeder and the odds are in your favor know matter what breed you go with. I like brittanys, I also have 1 male pup available right now. I am in LeRoy, so I am not far from you, if you want to come see how they work. I also raise chukars. You could bring your gun and shoot a few over my dogs if you would like.

Ike

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