• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
      You know what we all love...

      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Treaties of 1837 and 1854

Recommended Posts

Guest

I told you guys a loooooonnnng time ago that I would find you the actual treaties. Well, here they are. I used them in a report last year and i wasn't able to find them when you asked for them but here they are. Sorry its kinda long. Its really interesting. This is the actual. I hate to stir the pot again with this, But there many people who do not understand why things are the way there today with the indians. Its important to know that the ceded land was not given to the US, it was taken. I hate all the laws as much as everyone else and I'm not an "Indian hugger" but this shows how it came to be. pay close attention to Article 5 in the 1837 treaty. This is and was the controversial aspect of the treaty. It basically says that the indians can have all this for as long as the president allows.


1837 treaty with chippewa:

Article 1. The said Chippewa nation cede to the United States all the tract of country included within the following boundaries:

Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers, between twenty and thirty miles above where the Mississippi is crossed by the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude, and running thence to the north point of Lake St. Croix, one of the sources of the St. Croix river; thence to and along the dividing ridge between the waters of Lake Superior and those of the Mississippi, to the sources of the Ocha-suasepe a tributary of the Chippewa river; thence to a point on the Chippewa river, twenty miles below the outlet of Lake De Flambeau; thence to the junction of the Wisconsin and Pelican rivers; thence on an east course twenty-five miles; thence southerly, on a course parallel with that of the Wisconsin river, to the line dividing the territories of the Chippewas and Menominies; thence to the Plover Portage; thence along the southern boundary of the Chippewa country, to the commencement of the boundary line dividing it from that of the Sioux, half a days march below the falls on the Chippewa river; thence with said boundary line to the mouth of Wah-tap river; at its junction with the Mississippi; and thence up the Mississippi to the place of beginning.

Article 2. In consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States agrees to make to the Chippewa nation, annually, for the term of twenty years, from the date of the ratification of this treaty, the following payments.

Nine thousand five hundred dollars, to be paid in money.
Nineteen thousand dollars, to be delivered in goods.
Three thousand dollars for establishing three blacksmith shops, supporting the blacksmiths, and furnishing them with iron and steel.
One thousand dollars for farmers, and for supplying them and the Indians, with implements of labor, with grain or seed; and whatever else may be necessary to enable them to carry on their agricultural pursuits.
Two thousand dollars in provisions.
Five hundred dollars in tobacco.
The provisions and tobacco to be delivered at the same time with the goods, and the money to be paid; which time or times, as well as the place or places where they are to be delivered, shall be fixed upon under the direction of the President of the United States. The blacksmiths shops to be placed at such points in the Chippewa country as shall be designated by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, or under his direction. If at the expiration of one or more years the Indians should prefer to receive goods, instead of the nine thousand dollars agreed to be paid to them in money, they shall be at liberty to do so. Or, should they conclude to appropriate a portion of that annuity to the establishment and support of a school or schools among them, this shall be granted them.

Article 3. The sum of one hundred thousand dollars shall be paid by the United States, to the half-breeds of the Chippewa nation, under the direction of the President. It is the wish of the Indians that their two sub-agents Daniel P. Bushnell, and Miles M. Vineyard, superintend the distribution of this money among their half-breed relations.

Article 4. The sum of seventy thousand dollars shall be applied to the payment, by the United States, of certain claims against the Indians of which amount twenty-eight thousand dollars shall, at their request, be paid to William A. Aitkin, twenty-five thousand to Lyman M. Warren, and the balance applied to the liquidation of other just demands against them-which they acknowledge to be the case with regard to that presented by Hercules L. Dousman, for the sum of five thousand dollars; and they request that it be paid.

Article 5. The privilege of hunting, fishing, and gathering the wild rice, upon the lands, the rivers and the lakes included in the territory ceded, is guaranteed to the Indians, during the pleasure of the President of the United States.

Article 6. This treaty shall be obligatory from and after its ratification by the President and Senate of the United States.

Done at St. Peters in the Territory of Wisconsin the twenty-ninth day of July eighteen hundred and thirty-seven.

Henry Dodge, Commissioner


1854 treaty with the chippewa:

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at La Pointe, in the State of Wisconsin, between Henry C. Gilbert and David B. Herriman, commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior and the Mississippi, by their chiefs and head-men.

ARTICLE 1. The Chippewas of Lake Superior hereby cede to the United States all the lands heretofore owned by them in common with the Chippewas of the Mississippi, lying east of the following boundaryline, to wit: Beginning at a point, where the east branch of Snake River crosses the southern boundary-line of the Chippewa country, running thence up the said branch to its source, thence nearly north, in a straight line, to the mouth of East Savannah River, thence up the St. Louis River to the mouth of East Swan River, thence up the East Swan River to its source, thence in a straight line to the most westerly bend of Vermillion River, and thence down the Vermillion River to its mouth.
The Chippewas of the Mississippi hereby assent and agree to the foregoing cession, and consent that the whole amount of the consideration money for the country ceded above, shall be paid to the Chippewas of Lake Superior, and in consideration thereof the Chippewas of Lake Superior hereby relinquish to the Chippewas of the Mississippi, all their interest in and claim to the lands heretofore owned by them in common, lying west of the above boundry-line.

ARTICLE 2. The United States agree to set apart and withhold from sale, for the use of the Chippewas of Lake Superior, the following-described tracts of land, viz:
1st. For the L'Anse and Vieux De Sert bands, all the unsold lands in the following townships in the State of Michigan: Township fifty-one north range thirty-three west; township fifty-one north range thirty-two west; the east half of township fifty north range thirty-three west; the west half of township fifty north range thirty-two west, and all of township fifty-one north range thirty-one west, lying west of Huron Bay.
2d. For the La Pointe band, and such other Indians as may see fit to settle with them, a tract of land bounded as follows: Beginning on the south shore of Lake Superior, a few miles west of Montreal River, at the mouth of a creek called by the Indians Ke-che-se-be-we-she, running thence south to a line drawn east and west through the centre of township forty-seven north, thence west to the west line of said township, thence south to the southeast corner of township forty-six north, range thirty-two west, thence west the width of two townships, thence north the width of two townships, thence west one mile, thence north to the lake shore, and thence along the lake shore, crossing Shag-waw-me-quon Point, to the place of beginning. Also two hundred acres on the northern extremity of Madeline Island, for a fishing ground.
3d. For the other Wisconsin bands, a tract of land lying about Lac De Flambeau, and another tract on Lac Court Orielles, each equal in extent to three townships, the boundaries of which shall be hereafter agreed upon or fixed under the direction of the President.
4th. For the Fond Du Lac bands, a tract of land bounded as follows: Beginning at an island in the St. Louis River, above Knife Portage, called by the Indians Paw-paw-sco-me-me-tig, running thence west to the boundary-line heretofore described, thence north along said boundary-line to the mouth of Savannah River, thence down the St. Louis River to the place of beginning. And if said tract shall contain less than one hundred thousand acres, a strip of land shall be added on the south side thereof, large enough to equal such deficiency.
5th. For the Grand Portage band, a tract of land bounded as follows: Beginning at a rock a little east of the eastern extremity of Grand Portage Bay, running thence along the lake shore to the mouth of a small stream called by the Indians Maw-ske-gwaw-caw-maw-se-be, or Cranberry Marsh River, thence up said stream, across the point to Pigeon River, thence down Pigeon River to a point opposite the starting-point, and thence across to the place of beginning.
6th. The Ontonagon band and that subdivision of the La Pointe band of which Buffalo is chief, may each select, on or near the lake shore, four sections of land, under the direction of the President, the boundaries of which shall be defined hereafter. And being desirous to provide for some of his connections who have rendered his people important services, it is agreed that the chief Buffalo may select one section of land, at such place in the ceded territory as he may see fit, which shall be reserved for that purpose, and conveyed by the United States to such person or persons as he may direct.
7th. Each head of a family, or single person over twenty-one years of age at the present time of the mixed bloods, belonging to the Chippewas of Lake Superior, shall be entitled to eighty acres of land, to be selected by them under the direction of the President, and which shall be secured to them by patent in the usual form.

ARTICLE 3. The United States will define the boundaries of the reserved tracts, whenever it may be necessary, by actual survey, and the President may, from time to time, at his discretion, cause the whole to be surveyed, and may assign to each head of a family or single person over twenty-one years of age, eighty acres of land for his or their separate use; and he may, at his discretion, as fast as the occupants become capable of transacting their own affairs, issue patents therefor to such occupants, with such restrictions of the power of alienation as he may see fit to impose. And he may also, at his discretion, make rules and regulations, respecting the disposition of the lands in case of the death of the head of a family, or single person occupying the same, or in case of its abandonment by them. And he may also assign other lands in exchange for mineral lands, if any such are found in the tracts herein set apart. And he may also make such changes in the boundaries of such reserved tracts or otherwise, as shall be necessary to prevent interference with any vested rights. All necessary roads, highways, and railroads, the lines of which may run through any of the reserved tracts, shall have the right of way through the same, compensation being made therefor as in other cases.

ARTICLE 4. In consideration of and payment for the country hereby ceded, the United States agree to pay to the Chippewas of Lake Superior, annually, for the term of twenty years, the following sums, to wit: five thousand dollars in coin; eight thousand dollars in goods, household furniture and cooking utensils; three thousand dollars in agricultural implements and cattle, carpenter's and other tools and building materials, and three thousand dollars for moral and educational purposes, of which last sum, three hundred dollars per annum shall be paid to the Grand Portage band, to enable them to maintain a school at their village. The United States will also pay the further sum of ninety thousand dollars, as the chiefs in open council may direct, to enable them to meet their present just engagements. Also the further sum of six thousand dollars, in agricultural implements, household furniture, and cooking utensils, to be distributed at the next annuity payment, among the mixed bloods of said nation. The United States will also furnish two hundred guns, one hundred rifles, five hundred beaver-traps, three hundred dollars' worth of ammunition, and one thousand dollars' worth of ready-made clothing, to be distributed among the young men of the nation, at the next annuity payment.

ARTICLE 5. The United States will also furnish a blacksmith and assistant, with the usual amount of stock, during the continuance of the annuity payments, and as much longer as the President may think proper, at each of the points herein set apart for the residence of the Indians, the same to be in lieu of all the employees to which the Chippewas of Lake Superior may be entitled under previous existing treaties.

ARTICLE 6. The annuities of the Indians shall not be taken to pay the debts of individuals, but satisfaction for depredations committed by them shall be made by them in such manner as the President may direct.

ARTICLE 7. No spirituous liquors shall be made, sold, or used on any of the lands herein set apart for the residence of the Indians, and the sale of the same shall be prohibited in the Territory hereby ceded, until otherwise ordered by the President.

ARTICLE 8. It is agreed, between the Chippewas of Lake Superior and the Chippewas of the Mississippi, that the former shall be entitled to two-thirds, and the latter to one-third, of all benefits to be derived from former treaties existing prior to the year 1847.

ARTICLE 9. The United States agree that an examination shall be made, and all sums that may be found equitably due to the Indians, for arrearages of annuity or other thing, under the provisions of former treaties, shall be paid as the chiefs may direct.

ARTICLE 10. All missionaries, and teachers, and other persons of full age, residing in the territory hereby ceded, or upon any of the reservations hereby made by authority of law, shall be allowed to enter the land occupied by them at the minimum price whenever the surveys shall be completed to the amount of one quarter-section each.

ARTICLE 11. All annuity payments to the Chippewas of Lake Superior, shall hereafter be made at L'Anse, La Pointe, Grand Portage, and on the St. Louis River; and the Indians shall not be required to remove from the homes hereby set apart for them. And such of them as reside in the territory hereby ceded, shall have the right to hunt and fish therein, until otherwise ordered by the President.

ARTICLE 12. In consideration of the poverty of the Bois Forte Indians who are parties to this treaty, they having never received any annuity payments, and of the great extent of that part of the ceded country owned exclusively by them, the following additional stipulations are made for their benefit. The United States will pay the sum of ten thousand dollars, as their chiefs in open council may direct, to enable them to meet their present just engagements. Also the further sum of ten thousand dollars, in five equal annual payments, in blankets, cloth, nets, guns, ammunitions, and such other articles of necessity as they may require.
They shall have the right to select their reservation at any time hereafter, under the direction of the President; and the same may be equal in extent, in proportion to their numbers, to those allowed the other bands, and be subject to the same provisions.
They shall be allowed a blacksmith, and the usual smithshop supplies, and also two persons to instruct them in farming, whenever in the opinion of the President it shall be proper, and for such length of time as he shall direct.
It is understood that all Indians who are parties to this treaty, except the Chippewas of the Mississippi, shall hereafter be known as the Chippewas of Lake Superior. Provided, That the stipulation by which the Chippewas of Lake Superior relinquishing their right to land west of the boundary-line shall not apply to the Bois Forte band who are parties to this treaty.

ARTICLE 13. This treaty shall be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall be ratified by the President and Senate of the United States.
In testimony whereof, the said Henry C. Gilbert, and the said David B. Herriman, commissioners as aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the Chippewas of Lake Superior and the Mississippi, have hereunto set their hands and seals, at the place aforesaid, this thirtieth day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four.

Henry C. Gilbert,
David B. Herriman,
Commissioners.

Richard M. Smith, Secretary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

And yes, I still don't see any verbage in Artical 5 that precludes the State enforcing the same limits and equipment restrictions that is does on all others. It simply states they have the "privilage" as we all do, once we purchase a license.

As far as the land being "taken" from them, add up those numbers, have you any idea at all how much that was in goods and services in 1837? That's one HE11 of a big pot bucko!

[This message has been edited by Labrat (edited 01-25-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Do you know where we could find the regulations book for 1837? My point is,...there were no laws pertaining to limits and what not then. Never had any laws like that then, and neither did they. The treaty says heres your land do what you want with it. Not heres your land and the laws that go with it. This is why its gonna be so tough to change. What were they thinking back then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kidd

Your hitting the same roadblock the Supreme Court hit. What was the meaning of the words in 1837? Not the meaning of the words today. I've accepted the ruling and moving on. No more post on this subject by me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ackotz

10-4 Kidd...movin' on big buddy...

Treaty or no treaty...still haven't been catching walleyes at Mille Lacs this winter!

[This message has been edited by ackotz (edited 01-25-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
irvingdog

As it was told to me, at some time in the early 1820's, the Mille Lacs band of Ojibway ran another tribe off of much of what is now treaty land. Right's of conquest seemed to apply to them......
stir,stir,stir,stir..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bungholieo

Hey, where were you guys when Bud Grant was inciting the court test instead of the couple million the Indians were offering to settle. At the time, there were those in the legislature that said "Forget what you think is right or wrong, just consider if the court sides with the treaty". Guess what.....thanks Wisconsin Bud, hope you're enjoying hunting from Africa to South America while we're left with your "cowboy" loss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • redlabguy
      I haven’t seen many posts lately which means I’m not the only one struggling to find fish. I ventured out of Frazer into Big Bay today and fished 20 fow on a shore line pulling a spinner/crawler  at 1 mph and got a limit of nice fish in a half an hour. They hit almost as soon as I got the bait to the bottom. Just me and the lab- - otherwise, we would’ve put a lot more fish in the boat. It was the third place I tried. It’s good advice to fish where you see fish on the sonar.  RLG
    • yoppdk
    • srj
      Sounds like a great time, Hoey. Keeping active with old friends is really important...……….as I have advanced well past "middle age", most of my friends I fished/hunted with have either died or quit the outdoors pursuits. Bummer. However, Thursday I head to Morson with one of my remaining partners to spend a few days at his place at Sportsmans Landing, always a good time. That part of LOW is really fun! Endless rock humps to fish, and little traffic. A couple years ago, I got my bud into jigging raps and similar lures. Big fun jig rappin the sand flats in that area. And usually, we catch a few crappies for a great meal. One observation  after many years of fishing LOW north and east of Big Traverse involves the rock humps.....anyone with thoughts on this, please weigh in. In big Traverse, the rock bite peaks in July and slowly peters out. There are still good days, but by late August, you have to run and gun to find fish on the rocks. However, in Sabaskong, Little Traverse and areas north and east of Big Traverse, the rock bite stays very strong. On Whitefish Bay, my best rock fishing was the last couple weeks of August. My thought is it is because of the pressure on  the US side and the lack thereof on the Canada side. Opinions? Good luck.
    • Borch
      I was fishing 18-25 fow.  I cruised several humps that topped out around 17-20 fow and found fish on about 1/2 of them.  I only fished spots I marked good numbers of fish on them.   By horizontal I mean either making long cast and snapping the jigging rap back sharply or trolling 1- 1.2 mph and having enough line out that there would be a little slack before my next snap of the rod at that speed/depth.  You don't feel the hit.  The fish is just there on the next snap that then turns into a hook set.   I've also fished them vertically but many times the more horizontal presentation works better.  At least for me.   I caught fish on both 7&9 sizes.  But the 7s are easier on my arm with repetitive snapping of the rod.  These fish heavy and I've fished them like this in more than 30 feet of water. Metallic perch was the best color for me this weekend followed by rainbow trout or chartreuse.   Even caught several pike and crappies doing this type of fishing.  Moonshine shiver minnows work well too.  They get the nod when there is most on the bottom.  They fish cleaner that the jigging raps. 
    • delcecchi
      when was the most recent time it started normally?   You did start mixing oil in gas when you disconnected the injection system, right?    
    • opsirc
      I have a 1984 40hp evinrude, when to start this year after it has been sitting for 5yrs. It was drawing so much juice that it melted one one the terminals off. The only thing different is I disconnected the oil injection system because it was in constant alarm. Did this after talking to the service dept at a outboard motor dealership. Everything else is the same, when i parked it would turn over with no problem, now hard turning. Anyone have idea i am out of them.   Thanks
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a report of a zebra mussel in East Silent Lake in Otter Tail County.  A property owner contacted the DNR after finding a one-half inch zebra mussel attached to a native mussel near a dock in about two feet of water. DNR staff conducted follow-up searches of more than 1,500 objects in East Silent Lake and found no additional zebra mussels. The lake will be added to the infested waters list, because the DNR verified the initial report. The lake will be monitored for additional zebra mussels. “It’s helpful that lake users are being vigilant and are contacting us when they suspect they’ve found a zebra mussel,” DNR invasive species specialist Mark Ranweiler said. “We ask people to keep the specimen and send us a photo, to assist with identification and confirmation.” Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to: Clean watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species. Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport. Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash. Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody: Spray with high-pressure water. Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds). Dry for at least five days. Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes. People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species. More information is available at mndnr.gov/ais. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Lohmwil
      Hey Borch, What do you mean by horizontal presentation for jigging raps?  How deep were the mid lake humps you were fishing?  I've been experimenting with jigging raps this year and have caught some on them, but not a lot.  One final question, I've been using size 7.  What were you using?  THANKS.
    • Borch
      The eyes I got from 11 - 11:45 am.  The gills and crappies from 2:30 - 4:30 pm.  We did a picnic lunch and a boat tour of the lake as it was Wanda's first time on Osakis.   The panfish bite was very good.   Enjoyed our time as well.   Was hoping to see you before I went to get Wanda and left active fish. 
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a report of zebra mussels in Eagle Lake in Kandiyohi County.  A property owner contacted the DNR after finding a one-half inch zebra mussel on the north side of Eagle Lake. DNR staff conducted a two-hour snorkel search and found one additional zebra mussel on a settlement plate attached to a dock. The lake will be monitored for additional zebra mussels. “It’s helpful when lake users contact the DNR if they think they’ve found a zebra mussel or any other invasive species,” said DNR invasive species specialist Eric Katzenmeyer. “We ask people to keep the specimen and send us a photo, to assist with identification and confirmation.” Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to: Clean watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species, Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash. Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody: Spray with high-pressure water. Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds). Dry for at least five days. Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes. People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species. More information is available at mndnr.gov/ais. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.