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Joe Suits

Opinions on Lund Models

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Joe Suits

I'm thinking of upgrading from my Rebel 16 to either a Lund 1700 Angler SS or (new model),1800 Explorer SS. Which would you choose?


Thanks!

Joe

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bigeyes

Joe-
Bigger is better in my opinion, especially if you are going to use it on Milly or other big waters. Otherwise for most of the rest of the lakes either one will due fine. I am sure you will be happy with both. I like Lund best.

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Guest

Bigeyes said it -- I'll second it -- go with the 18. Even one foot difference in the length of a boat makes an enormous difference.

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Dan97

I'll be upgrading soon myself. My current craft is a 1997 Angler 1600 side console. It's going to be an 18 footer minimum for this kid. My choice, in your situation, would be the 1800 Explorer. Personally, I think I'll be going for the 1800 Fisherman. Gotta love those creature comforts!! Too bad timing is wrong for Scott's boat. She's a honey.

Dan

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LOW Lover

Whichever Lund Boat you purchase, the bottom line is to max out the horsepower for the boat. You may want to think about the weight, I believe the Angler may be heavier which will bounce around less in the waves. I have a Pro V 1800 and was in 3 foot rollers jigging on reefs this summer on the Woods and was pleased at how I had fantastic boat control with my bow mount.
Good Luck!

LOW Lover

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potto

Consider Crestliner's Fishhawk(around 10K)(17) or (16) or their Sportfish(gets more spendy)...for the money...it has the widest beam in the business....lots o room and nice design.....made in Little Falls, MN


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Anglin' Freak

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Guest

Crestliner's hulls ride the water nice, and they also plane out quicker then a Lund. (I have owned both)

However, the floor quality in a Lund is far superior to that of the Crestliner.

The Lunds have a higher transome also.

Crestliner now has a lifetime hull warranty, and a 3 year bow to stearn. Lund I believe still has a 10 year hull warranty, and I am not certain on the bow to stearn on them.

good luck with whatever you decide.

Kevin

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Skeets

I just upgraded to a 2003 Pro Angler 16. This boat fits my needs to a tee. I went with the Yamaha 60 four stroke. I would highly reccommend a four stroke, smooth, quiet and powerful. She tops out at 35 MPH and cuts the waves very nicely. The IPS hull is truely a great invention.

I almost bought a Angler SS, but opted for the tiller model for the added storage and floor space.

I looked at all brands of boats and I am convinced that Lund has the best boat on the water...hands down. Buy a Lund, you won't regret it. smile.gif

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Good Fishin'
Skeets
[email protected]

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Guest

Now that's talking. I own a 1996 Lund Pro Angler 16, and it's powered by a 2002 2 cycle 50 HP Yamaha.

I like the boat, love the motor, and seize the moment to angle Crappies.

PCG

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Guest

Most definitely get the biggest boat you can afford and max it out on horsepower. The only problem I have with the new Lund's is that they almost are to pretty to fish out of.

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Slugo

I have a Crestliner Pro-Am 1750 with the 75hp tiller. I'll take the ride that has over most anything. I hired a guide a while back that had a 18 ft lund and while it was faster and had the top and such the crestliner was smother and quieter on the water. Oh yea the Pre-Am is called Tournament seires now. I should say that the tiller does get tiering if it is rough out ya tend to get one Popeye arm!

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MJCatfish

Slugo,
I'll second that. The 1750 Pro Am with 75 Merc tiller fits my needs well. Rides well in rough water. I do get a good work out when on Mille Lacs, The Woods, or Leech when I'm putting on miles in rough water, though.

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Guest

i have had my boat now for two fishing season and i absolutely love it
i would recommend it to anyone who is on some big water or likes to cover a large area fast
i have a 1900 lund pro v IFS
it has a full windshield but has the pro v body
this way you can net fish well and have all the luxuries of a pro v and also have a full windshield so you dont get wet
the casting platform is huge
i have a 200 merc optimax with a 15 hp 4 stroke and a 74 lb thrust genesis
one thing i would change is to get a 101 lb thrust genesis
that little extra power is always nice
this boat has been a life saver out on lake of the woods and mille lacs
i have fished in a lot of boats and i would not trade this boat for anything
it is so easy to fish out of and easy to handle
one problem i noticed with the lund tyees and fishermans is that they have such a high side that when the wind is blowing it is extrememly hard to control them
that is something you might want to think about
if anyone has any ?'s just give me a shout i would like to hear comments

remember keep and eat

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Kicker

I finally got rid of my lund 1775 pro V and got a Ranger Fisherman Series. If you are going spend the money on a nice boat I woulnd't even swing into Lund dealership to see if they were giving them away...I'd drive the extra few miles and check out the Rangers. Not trying to step on any toes here but I honestly think that the Ranger ride is far superior to a lund, and you don't need a full windshield because you don't get wet to begin with!!

Kicker

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mistermom

If I had to do it all over I would go glass and go tiller. My Mr. Pike 17 is great most of the time, but it sucks in big waves.

mm

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TundraKing

Went boat shopping last spring and had a hard time. So many different models and so many different opinions. Loved the Lunds. But ended up getting the Tracker Tundra 18ft Deep-V with a Merc 125 2-stroke. Never, ever, thought I would buy a Tracker but they broke the norm with this one. Has the curves of glass but it has a completely molded aluminum hull with a lifetime warrenty. Thickest aluminum hull in its class. No rivets. Alum flooring is welded in. Has three rod compartments, two livewells, two airated baitwells, the new Minnekota All-terrain 55 pound thrust troller, etc... The list goes on and on. And so am I. Handles great in big waves and has brought in many a nice walleye on the Big Pond. Just got myself excited to take it out again.

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Guest

kicker

i was wondering what you are going to do when you get out in the big water with that ranger/?
wont the waves come over and swamp that boat??
maybe i am thinking of a different model but dont they sit really close to the water
cant waves come right over the top and sides??
i also have a hard time believing that if you are going across a lake with big waves that the splash from the waves never gets blown into your boat
i am pretty sure no boat is wet proof
but if there is one i would love to know about it
dont get me wrong i do think those rangers are nice boats, but when it comes to the best
i will always stick behind my lund IFS

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Kicker

keepandeat,

I am pretty sure you thinking of the Ranger Bass boats...but at the same time they would probably perform on the big pond just fine. However I am talking about the Ranger Fisherman series designed for walleye fisherman and big water. You should check 'em out.

Kicker

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James 31

I really believe the best boat out there now is a 20 or 21 foot Pro V. With the counsil(s) moved back, it makes for the smoothest ride aluminum can offer. Granted you're gonna get a little wet, but show me a boat that you won't when crossing four footers. I have fished out of a Targa many times the last couple years. I was very content with it too. Glass is nice but you still get wet. With the new Lunds you can keep up with glass if not pass them.
James

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Mykal

I have a 2000 AnglerSS 16ft 3in. with a Merc 90. I fish Mille Lacs with it 2-3 times a month. Advantages of a smaller boat is the ease of getting in and out of the water and trailering it to local lakes. Plus It tops out at 45mph with a Lazer II SS. THe disadvantage of course is I can't stroll out on the windy side of the lake and do get wet when the wind is blowing 15mph or more. I will probably go with a larger boat someday but I have had no problems manuevering on the Big Pond in most conditions.

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