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wazz

Spinners: Blades-n-Beads?

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wazz

Hey everbody good to see people learning new things on the pond. Pretty nice when the fishing is so good, builds a little confidence to try something different. How about some of your favorite beads and blades on your spinner rigs.
One of my favorites is 6' with a quick change clevise, I start with a red hatchet blade. 2 silver beads in front and 6 chartreuse behind. I have to admit I probably switch the blade around a little to much, but thats just the way I am....

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Guest

Give the infiltrater spinners a try. They work great and the best part about them is one person can use a lindy and the other can use one of these spinners because they work good at low speeds. Then switch accordingly. I use 4 red beads and a chartuce/ silver blade most often. They all catch fish this year.
I think even a turd used as bait will catch wallys out there this year.

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Guest

We caught more fish this weekend with no spinner on our lindy rig. We had a 6ft. leader with 1 red bead and plain hook. It outfished the standard spinner blade combo by far. We only caught 2 fish with the blade and we had 30 fish Saturday. We left the lake at 3:30 pm because it was so hot. Sloppy Joes and 7 mile were the 2 spots.

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Whiskeywalleyes

I was up this weekend and it seems as though it did not matter on any specific color, type of blade, but the length of the spinner rigg was the key. 6'snells 6' snells
Friday we got out at 6pm, fished till 10.
Caught about 20. Only 2 in ther slot.
Most were comming out of the deep water off the flats, (typically on the down current/drift side of the flat.)
Saturday 30 eyes.
7 mile was hot, Shermans was hot, Batton, and curley,s.
Caught 4 27"
Caught 1 28+ deep water!

My ratio seems to be out of what you catch only 15% will be in the slot!
Have fun fishing, bring lots of crawlers and two nets for three people. Mille lacs is on fire

[This message has been edited by Whiskeywalleyes (edited 07-01-2002).]

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Blaze

Another question to add to the mix: I'm a "self-taught" Lindy rigger (for better or for worse!) and have always done 2 hooks for crawler rigs and have gone back and forth with 1 or 2 hooks on leech rigs. Do you guys have better luck with 1 or 2 hook Lindys with leeches? Seems my trailer hook tangles easier on leeches than crawlers and I rarely hook 'eyes on the trailer hook with leeches (maybe 10%), which is just opposite of my crawler rigs - probably hook 60-70% of my 'eyes on trailer hook with crawlers.

Tight lines,
Blaze

* FYI - favorite spinner on ML is small hammered gold with a few red beads between spinner and hook - and yes, 6'-8' snells

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Guest

The Infiltrators are hot, My favorite combo is the hammered silver with green beads. This resembles the color and flash of a Lake Mille Lacs spottail shiner.

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MILLE LACS AREA GUIDE SERVICE
651-271-5459 http://fishingminnesota.com/millelacsguide/
click here

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DCICE

Are these Infiltrators in local tackle shops? spinners rigs are a mainstay in my tackle bag!! Caught a few nice 'eyes this week on blue rattle beads with gold blade.
DC

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DCICE

Are these Infiltrators in local tackle shops? spinners rigs are a mainstay in my tackle bag!! Caught a few nice 'eyes this week on blue rattle beads with gold blade.
DC

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Tonka Boy

Blaze,
I tried using a stinger hook on my leech rig for the first time earlier this season. I did manage to catch more of those short biters, but I didn't like using it at all. I spent 90% of my time untwisting the leech. Feeding line to the fish is a whole lot easier. Not to metion the presentation is much more realistic.

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Tonka Boy

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Rick

Infiltrator Spinner Rigs do have the hammered gold spinners in the kit.

These babies are the real deal. Very versatile going slow or fast.

You'll want to use them in slow presentations as well as fast reaction type bite presentations.

97% of users have claimed dramatic improvements in their catch rates using them versus other spinners.

It's the time of year you can use the panfish spinners to go after suspended crappies in main lake basin areas.

You can see the full line-up at:

http://fishingminnesota.com/spinner-rigs-infiltrator.html

You will definitely appreciate these spinners.

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