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luv2fish

What to expect on a launch......

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luv2fish

I am going to the Mille Lacs Lake area this weekend for a family reunion. We have a fair amount of fisherman in the family, so we rented a launch for Sat. Morning (8-12). I have never fished the lake before (I think it is cause it intimidates me), or been out on a launch. From reading all of the posts, I am expecting to get into some fish. But what else can I expect.... Will it be all fishing with bobbers??? They told us we could bring our own poles, do they usually have the bait/tackle setups??? Unfortunately my uncle set all this up, so I don't even know what place we are going out of.

I guess I am just curious to hear other people's experiences with these types of trips.

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vikes40for60

I have fished Mille Lacs many times both on my own boat and launches. I will also be on a launch next week wed night out of the west side with 17 of my closest personal fishing friends. There is no better time to gamble, fish, and consume some of your favorite barley beverages.

Expect to use bobbers and fishing with leeches. Depending on the bite and the wind the captain will will either anchor or drift. If they are experienced (which most are) they usually put you on fish. The ride out to the spot will be 20 minutes or so. Then cross our fingers that the morning bite is still on. Sit back, relax, let THEM put you on fish and enjoy!

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Luv2fish,
I've never fished from a launch before, but my friends that have say that for the extra $5 a head they'll supply the poles and tackle.
Normally I'd prefer to fish with my own gear, but on a launch where you're bobber fishing right next to a bunch of others over the rail you might get tangled with others lines often and tangle or break the line. Is it worth $5 to you to have another rod handed to you ready to fish whenever this happens ??
It would be to me.
Good Luck and have fun

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huskminn

Luv2fish,

I've never seen a launch that didn't provide rods, reels, tackle and bait.

You will be slip-bobber fishing and you will be using leeches. The back of the launch is the easiest place to fish because it is downwind, however, watch other people's lines as much as your own to avoid tangles as their bobbers drift into yours.

I have always brought my own gear because I hate using other people's stuff. I don't know it, it may not be the quality I like, etc, etc.

Otherwise, yes, as Vikes said, just sit back, relax and, if it's really windy, enjoy the fact that you're not sitting in a 16' boat and getting pounded by the waves.

Good luck.

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What you expect from a Launch Service depends on what you get from the captain. Your captain should have the boat clean,toilet empty,poles ready and plenty of bait and gas on board. The boat should leave the dock at a resonable time from the departure time. Once anchored, the captain should set your lines and bait your hook for those who don't care for leeches or crawlers. The captain should try to give each person aboard the boat the same attention. The captain should net and remove your fish from your line. The most important responsiblity from a captain next to safety is to make sure he or she checks your slip knot (on your line if your bobber fishing) everytime you catch a fish. This will ensure any lose knots will get you back down to the fish again. If they don't check, ask to have it checked. Last of all, expect the captain to do everything they can to put the boat on fish. The fish are biting good now, but a spot can still dry up quick. If your not happy with your first Mille Lacs Launch trip, don't get discouraged, they are all different, keep going until you find a good one. As a former captain, hope this helps. Good Luck

------------------
MILLE LACS AREA GUIDE SERVICE
651-271-5459 http://fishingminnesota.com/millelacsguide/
click here

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luv2fish

Thanks for the info. It gives me a good start on expectations. I guess for an additional $5 you can rent poles and such. But I am more comfortable using my own. But it does bring up a dumb question I have. I am familiar witt bobber fishing for Panfish. I am familiar with trolling lindy rigs, little joes, crank baits, etc. We also exclusivelt use jigs tipped with minnows in Canada. But what is the proper setup for slip bobbering for Walleyes??? Do I just use a plain hook and then put wieght on it? Do you tie a 1/4 oz jig to your line??

I want to make sure I have what the captain is suggeting we use, just in case he doesn't supply tackle (right now I am assuming he will).

Thanks,

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