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Turkeys??


CornPirateKiller

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All right, I love dogs too (including my own yellow lab) but I'm getting tired of reading threads about dogs. Anybody else out there have turkeys on the brain? Are you practicing your calls and driving your family crazy? Are you checking your decoys and your camo? Are you glassing fields and scouting new areas? I've applied for both Minnesota and Iowa permits and I'm dreaming of a big tom struttin' up to my decoy. Speak up, fellow gobblers! Anyone else dreaming of Springtime in the woods?

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Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati (When all else fails, play dead)

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I'm ready and waiting...hopefully this will be my 1st 2 bird year! I've gotten permits in Wi and Mn in the past but never in the same year. As my confidence grows with each Tom, I've elected to apply for later seasons, hopefully getting me the opportunity to hunt a couple weeks this year instead of one. Patiently waiting for the word from the DNR...need to find my diaphram calls...sight in the new shotgun...pull out the dekes...go talk to the landowner, holy crap I better get moving! Good Luck this season all who pursue the mighty gobbler!

Ken

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I wish I was able to be as fired up as you, but I was quail hunting in Kansas and missed the deadline. Really bummed, first time in 6 years that we missed the app. Good luck to everyone that gets drawn, maybe I'll try for the fall hunt. Anyone ever done that?

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D.B. I'll never forget the 1st flush of my first Lab...it was down in Northeastern Iowa on a cold January day. Ol' 5 month old "Corks" finally got a whif of something that she really wanted to get after, a short tracking job later up flushed 5 turkeys out of the marsh grass, the look on her face was priceless, grin.gif she didn't know if she should run, hide, wag her tail, chase, bark, or roll over and play dead. I don't know what part of that day stuck in her head, but she really turned out to be one of the better ones....

Good Luck!

Ken

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On the brain, but not in the planning stage yet. I'm going with my bow this year so I have to start practicing soon. Went 2 years ago with it, but had to resort to the shotgun as the winds were extremely high for all 5 days. Last year, I had just bought and sold a house so I had to shoot another one with the shotgun.

It's a great hunt and I can't wait. First year for my old man to be along. It will be fun dragging along a new guy.

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CornPirateKiller,
I always have Turkey on the brain!
I got 6 hens just last night; they weighed in at 22- 27 Lbs each! I haven’t shot any though; I usually just walk up behind them and grab their legs. I suppose if I shot at them I would get between 20 –25 with each shot. The place I hunt turkey I always see around 85,000 to 90,000 birds 3-4 times a day! It doesn’t get any better than this!
What do you mean by calling them? they just come running to me?

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Just kidding, Before anyone calls the DNR, I own a Turkey farm! So if things dont pan out during hunting season let me know I would be willing to let a few toms out of the barn.

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duckbuster, no you can't use dogs. but maybe you could work out a deal to run your dog with Muskie Maina. smile.gif

I'm ready!! I recently inherited my grandfathers old "white powder wonder" single shot 12 gauge, think I'm going to use it spring.

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Muskie Man,
I thought I worked with a bunch of turkeys but you've really got me beat! I may take you up on your offer if the birds are shy... make it a real turkey shoot! grin.gif

Had some business in Owatonna yesterday and had a long break so I spent about three hours at Cabellas drooling over stuff that I don't need. Always fun to look it all over, though. Found all kinds of stuff that would assure my success this Spring but I figured I'd give the toms a sporting chance. Can't seem to make it to a lake to wet a line so I'm dreaming of the next sport on the calendar. Can't wait to hear those gobbles in the dark when I'm waiting for the sun to come up. Keep up the chatter, reading these posts is the only thing that keeps me sane until I make it back out into the great outdoors!!

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Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati (When all else fails, play dead)

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Couple questions for you turkeys, err, ABOUT Turkeys.....
The youth Mossberg just wasn't the gun for my wife so I plunked down for a christmas 870 Express 20ga. Looking for suggestions on choke tubes and a good turkey scope for the 20ga, gotenny?

How's about hot calls? I have a Primos Alumislate that's a few years old and picked up the wife a "Freak" last year. Had trouble keeping them sounding good, any conditioning tips? What do you think of the crystal or glass calls? I can make diaphragms sound good but hardly ever get much response (guess they sound better to me then yon gobblers), kinda partial to the slate because of this.
I have hunted mid/late May for the last 3 years in a row, hope to put my wife on a bird this spring, DNR willing. Hunted last fall-turkey and was thoroughly aggravated by the non-regulation-knowing persons originating from a country other than the U.S. shooting every chickadee, squirrel and who knows what else in sight. Hopefully the local DNR officers will educate these people. It's gettin' out of hand. Enough of my bee yatchin'.
Any tips or observations would be welcome about the turkey hunting. Best of Luck to you and yours.

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Good Lord. Stop it. I'm hyper-ventilating.

I love fishing, I love ice-fishing, I love waterfowl hunting, and I love pheasant hunting. I'd give them all up tomorrow if someone made me choose between turkey hunting and the rest of it. And, I've only been on two hunts. Does this obsession wane the more you go?

Speaking of flushing turkeys. How many people have instinctively shouldered their gun when they have unintentionally blown a bird off a trail? I walked up on four different birds last year and shouldered my gun each time. Heck, once I blurted out "Hen!" Then it dawned on me that I'm not pheasant hunting, and I'd needed a punt gun to bring a turkey out of the air.

Man, I cannot wait to hear a gobble.

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Ray Esboldt
MarCum
Stone Legacy

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  • 'we have more fun' FishingMN Creators

Cornpiratekiller,

I can't help it I've got major turkeys on the brain. I've been seeing flocks of 6-50+ 3-4 times a week. It's getting hard to take.

Tombow,

One of my daughters used the rem 870 youth in 20 gauge. I picked her up a hastings turkey tube, attached tru glo tru point sight to her vent. rib. We found that #6 federal 3" turkey loads shot very well in this set up. She get and average of 15 hits in the spine and brain at 35 yards.

Funny thing is many hunters think the 20 gauge is a short range gun for turkeys. Actually it shoots most turkey loads within 50 fps of the 3" mag 12 gauge loads. But with less shot it all comes down to whether you have sufficient pattern there to kill the bird. With #6 shot I keep my shots around 35 yards or less.

Other good chokes would be comp-n-choke. Heavyshot is also an option for increased range 40+ yards with #6 shot(great retained every than lead). But they are pretty pricey.

Good Luck!

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Looks like I'm not the only turkey-crazy nut out there. Took my first tom last year and was elated until I realized my season was over for another year. Wish I could afford to hunt more states!!

Good discussion on the choke tubes. I shoot a 12 ga. Rem. 11-87 and last year used the standard full choke tube. Worked great and patterned well in test. I have a patternmaster tube that I use for goose hunting though and I'm thinking I'll pattern test that this spring and see if it's any better than the full. Anybody have any thoughts/ideas/experience using a patternmaster for turkeys?

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Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati (When all else fails, play dead)

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My opinion, maybe not worth the server space it occupies...spend time finding the right load. A super full choke can shoot a sketchy pattern depending on the load.

I've shot 3 birds in my 4 seasons, last season in Spring every time. One shot on each bird. I use a $20 single shot 12 gauge with BB sight I bought used years ago.

I put sling mounts on and spray painted dull green/black. I refuse to lug a tank of a gun up and down the bluffs...a guy has to carry enough stuff when turkey hunting the way it is. This gun has no change out chokes, barrel is full. It shoots a tight pattern and so it became my turkey gun.

I tried 6 combinations of brands and mixes (4's, 6's, 4x6's) before I found the best one for the gun. Last year, the bird I took was at 42 yards...no chasing him down either.

I think the rule is 7 BB's in the neck and head total. Get that and you won't have a problem...if you can hit the broad side of a barn of course.

Per my previous post, I'm taking the bow this year. Shotguns are just too easy! Oh, and yes, I shouldered my gun once out of instinct after I jumped a bird about 5 yards from me. Wow...that was loud and startling at first!

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Borch--Thanks again (got your other reply on the NWTF message board). I've read that certain size shot work better with certain choke constrictions, particularly 4's need a slightly more open choke than 6's or 5's. My best pattern combo is my 870 12ga. Undertaker .665 choke and Federal 6's in 3". Winchester 6's, identical in spec to the Federal's didn't do as well in my gun, maybe due to the differences in wads. Yup, patterning will tell the tale and steer us all in the right direction and away from the wrong direction.

Buckblaster--I'm fixin' to bag my first bow gobbler this year (same as last year and the year before when I didn't have the bow-confidence and bagged my first ever turkey with the 12.) What broadhead will you use? I have been shooting the Thunderhead Gobbler getter (not at a bird yet) and had a guy tell me the other day that he shot one with this head and the blunt point just slid down the breast bone on a facing shot. Makes me think about finding something else. I've heard good things about Vortex 2" cut heads and have also shot the rockets. I might just stick with my Montecs as they fly well and hit the deer hard. But we are talking turkeys.... Aww, shucks, I don' know.....

Best of luck to all ya'll!

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Hey Tombow...I need to read up some more. 2 years ago I practiced for 3 months to prepare and we had 5 days of extreme winds so I had to tote the 12. Last year, I purchased and sold a house in April so no practice time.

So back into it this year...I'm torn. I like the Muzzy 4 blades. They shoot really well out of my bow. I know that you want that arrow to stay in the bird. No matter if you shoot to pin a wing and get some vitals or shoot for the top of the drumsticks to keep them on the ground...you want that arrow to stay in them.

So I have a half dozen 'Turkey Stoppers'. They go on the broadhead stem before you screw it in. Too heavy in my opinion. What I'm really looking for is range. We hunt late every year and the Tom's are skidding. 60-80 yard birds show up alot, closing the gap to 20-30 gets tough in late seasons. I know if I start practicing soon, I can group at 60. Not sure I'd try it, it would really depend on the situation, number of birds, wind, etc. But to me, the flatter (lighter) the trajectory the better in that case.

Few bow shots on a turkey will 'bleed' them out in a sense like a double lung on a whitetail or bear. So to me, the amount of surface area it cuts isn't a crucial factor...just a flat consistent shot.

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  • 'we have more fun' FishingMN Creators

Tombow,

Yeah I have an undertaker too for my winchester 1300s. It likes a heavy dose of #6 shot also. Doesnt like the bigger stuff though.

I also use the tru glo strut stopper choke. I like #5 shot 2 oz federal loads.

Just goes to show. Both chokes are .665 constriction but like different stuff in the same guns.

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Buck--
Yup, I bought some of those "Turkey stoppers", I think the ones I bought were put out by Muzzy. Heavy. Only took a couple practice shots with them, ripped a mean hole but I wasn't convinced that I wanted them backing up my broadheads. Keeping the arrow in the bird would definitely help slow the birds escape down but I'm concerned with penetration and making sure that the broadhead "gets in there and cracks 'em good!". I'm probably gonna end up with a large cut expandable (2") to maximize the chance of breaking bones but still getting through feathers. Guess I'll have to get to testing soon. I'll be spending many a cold practice session in my backyard this winter, shooting out of the blind at all distances, from 5 yards to 40 yards and hoping that the DNR shines it's turkey tag light on my wife AND myself for this spring. Best of Luck!

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Ditto on the cold practices TB. And it's always so much nicer to shoot when you don't have 14 winter layers on!

I think the hardest part is practicing to shoot off of your butt or a short seat with your feet in front of you. I had this mastered 2 years ago, but it's not easy at first and now I have to start all over again.

I'm not sure I'm sold on large cutting diameter. Deer/bear hide is easy to cut through and the more surface area of the lung/heart that is cut, the faster they bleed out. Turkey wing feathers are unbelievably tough...I've had to pull them with a pliers before! The more blade has to make it through the feathers, the less penetration I would say.

I guess I go back to, you're not likely going to bleed out a turkey. Much like a shotgun just immobilizes them they don't likely bleed to death but rather their nervous system fails them. So the breaking bones would send a shock through their nervous system. But the guys that shoot high on the drumsticks just immobilize them and run out and take care of the rest with a boot.

I just pulled every magazine the other day with a turkey article in it out of my pile of Bowhunter mags. I have to read up on some recommendations and make a decision based on guys that have done it. I'll let you know what I find out...WHEN we get picked!

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I did some searching last year, and the year before, and the year before....on the NWTurkFed site and Edersbow and HuntInfoSystems, inquiring of experienced bow hunters on what they use. Got replies listing everything under the sun, such as: "same as I use for deer", "Vortex", "Muzzy", "Rockets", etc. I am thinking about the big-cut Vortex (expandable) because it is 0.75" going in and 2" when expended. Theory: small cut going in will be easier to get through the feather layer, then the 2" expanded will increase the odds that the spine is damaged, in case the bird moves at the shot or the shot is off some. For me, it's all about shot placement, just like deer. I have been studying turkey anatomy, trying to figure out shot angles, etc. I'd really like to see a turkey version of the 3-D deer target that has accurate vitals, that would be a great tool to learn the angles and stuff and where the spine runs. With a shotgun, you shoot them in the head and you have a wide pattern so most of the time you'll cover any head movement. With a bow, you gotta disable the ability to escape, this means head shoot them (real iffy in my opinion), break spine or disable their wings so they can't fly. Problem is they may run off and, like you say, don't expect to be blood-trailing a turkey. More likely, if they run off, you'll have to look under every brush pile, fall down, etc. and pray you get lucky and find the bird. Jessie's Hunting Page has some good info about turkey anatomy, including a picture of a turkey skeleton. I'm trying to figure out a way of taking pictures of live birds in different positions, strut, half-strut, head erect, head down and superimpose the spine on them for reference. Someday I'll figure that out.
I agree that most turkeys are finished off using the "Rocky turkey-bucket kick" neck stand. My first (and only) bird, bagged with the ole Rem.12 was finished that way. Dropped like a rock at the shot but was still flappin' wing when I got to it.

Anyway, guess I got some research to do. Where do you hunt? I have been south of Belle Plaine for the last 3 years, Minn. River Valley and hunting "G" season.

Good Luck!

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I like your description of the finishing move on a gobbler Tombow. In your readings, did anyone suggest the drumstick shot..top dead center of thier legs?

I've heard about it first hand from a guy in an archery shop, and read about it in one article. Guess it renders them useless for running and supposedly they can't take off without their legs springing them off the ground. Now, I'm not so sure on this one, but the same guy at the archery shop told me that if you can get an arrow in them (anywhere)they won't fly off. He had said, it's easy, target is larger than the vitals on a deer, just get it in em. Not sure I fully agree, they're pretty tough.

Then again, I've killed many ducks, pheasants, grouse, etc that only had 1-2 BB holes in them. Birds nervous system seems to just give in when faced with a shock to the system...so maybe there is some merit to this guy's belief?

Without being too specific, I hunt in the south east. We've hunted the past 4 H seasons and I've been very blessed with 3 birds and a real close encounter with a Tom with 15 minutes left on the season the year I didn't bag one. Our preference level this year is 1, so we applied for the 7 day G season also.

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Buckblaster-
I have often read about the "drumstick" shot. It's definitely a good idea, IMO, to study the anatomy of the bird, try to figure where the backbone is based on the birds position (strut, half-strut, feeding, standing alert, etc.) and angle. The theory definitely holds water that keeping the arrow in the bird will limit his ability to flee. My concern with this is how do you balance the desire to get the arrow through the first side, retaining enough energy to break bone, but keep it from penetrating the second (off)side? I am suspicious of the bowshop guy that says "any arrow in the bird will keep it from flying off". Absolute statements (ALWAYS or NEVER) always make me question. I've seen video of turkeys flying off with arrows hanging from them, which indicates that you can't say ALWAYS about this. I'll stick with the bone breaking theory; crack 'em and they won't get away, then get out of the blind and stand on their neck. My theory on broadheads is that Mechs. may be better because you'll get the initial penetration, some energy will be lost opening the blades and it'll take more energy to punch through the offside with the now-larger (expanded)diameter. Maybe I'll have to buy a feathered turkey from a farmer and do some testing, I don't know! Like I said, I guess I'll just have to test different broadheads, different shot angles, different target positions etc. in order to prepare, then hope that, when it becomes time to attempt to take my first gobbler, I've done enough practice. I know that it can be done (shooting a turkey with a bow), just got to do the best prep that I can, pray for a turkey tag and hope turkey fever don't knock me over when "BIG BOSS GOBBLER" is in range!

SE Minnesota is bound to be hot, but also is probably pretty popular. Those river bluff areas and the oak forests are great habitat and beautiful country, especially when your chasin' the WILY GOB. As soon as the lottery results come out (AND THEY SAY "YOUSE GOT YOSEF A TAG,BOY!!AND ONE FOR YOUR WIFE, TOO!!"), I'm gonna start knockin' on doors in my zone and see if I can get some of the neighbors to allow me/us a few days or even a day of access on their property which is adjacent to the public land that I usually hunt.
It'll be interesting to see the harvest results from spring 2004 and see if the couple extra days and increase in available tag will affect the success rates. Turkey population is positively blowing up in Minnesota but the DNR is being very conservative about the number of available tags. I swear that I see turkeys in new areas every year. I hunt some private land around St. Cloud and there is a resident flock of turkeys around there. I wonder how far north their gonna go? There's turkeys in Canada so who knows? We may be seeing turkeys on drives up to LOW soon! This is the first year that I've seen any changes in the tag quotas or days, other than when they increased the hunt hours to 5PM. Best of Luck to you and yours, hope you get a tag. I'll keep you posted on my broadhead testing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Tombow...back to looking for information again. We were picked for season G!

Another forum I like to frequent is archerytalk.com Hopefully I don't get my hand slapped for dropping this in. There are hunters from all over the country on the forum so the topics move really quick. I believe the southern boys are gearing up for their seasons and turkey talk is plastered all over it right now.

Seems there are others that love the idea of a head/neck shot with a 4" cutting diameter broadhead from Arrowdynamic Solutions. Try this...

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/index.php?s=32df00db471bbbb72702cb3b9c7b419a

Look in the "Bowhunting and Bowhunter Showcase".

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Mr.Blaster,
I am familiar with ArcheryTalk.com. I tend to hang around more on edersbow, NWTF, some on Jesse's Hunting Page (A great Turkey info source!) and sporadically elsewhere.
I think I'm gonna go with the Rocket Hammerhead 3L 100gr.2" expandable. They have a relatively small point, similar to the point on a Thunderhead fixed blade, which should be good for initial penetration. The 2" cutting diameter should help get those bones broken and keep the bird down. I shot at Capra's last Wednesday and Sunday, mostly shooting sitting down so I could try and duplicate how I'll be shooting out of the D-Bull when the Triple-Gobbler wanders up to my set-up! Hopefully the Turkey fever won't hit me bad and my shot will be hittin' him right!
I'm glad to have a couple extra days this year since the DNR so graciously added a few to the last two seasons. I thought it was a typo when I read it back in November but it must be one of those experimental regs or trying to give us late seasoners a little more odds because the birds are gonna have seen some stuff (hunting pressure) by then. Either way, 2 more days in the woods than usual chasin' turks?? Yes Sir! Thank you Sir!! Will do Sir!!
Picked up the Primos Power Crystal after doing some research and having the durn thing a-starin' at me at Fleet Farm the other day! Should be sweet. I seem to be a Primos guy as far as slate style calls, I have an Alumislate, a FREAK and now the Pow.Crystal. They all sound good. Still gotta work on the mouth call though, practice makes....well....at least is SORTA sounds like a turkey!!??
Best of Luck to all ya'll!!

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Tombow:

Been hunting with the Power Crystal for about 3 years now.....great call. The purple heart striker is the most consistent, with the carbon striker having quite a bit of slip, even when roughed up. During wet weather, I use H.S. Strut's carbon tipped striker (can't remember the name), and that works OK. The call is good in a variety of situations, which is why I like it so much......nice and soft for tree yelps, and crank on the thing if you need to cut wind......with the call.

Just found out that the results of the lottery have been posted online for a few weeks now, so go to www.dnr.state.mn.us, wade through everything to the turkey site, and check it out. I didn't draw this year, after 3 successful years in a row, but will be hunting in KS, WI, and possibly MO this year. I'm going to try to get a surplus tag for MN too....that is if a divorce lawyer doesn't have my turkey gear by then!

I don't know what it is about turkey hunting, but I need to "pace" myself when it comes to breaking out my calls and gear. I did it around Jan. 15th last year, and drove myself certifiably insane come the spring season. I'm doing well this year, and just broke them out this past weekend. I'll still be crazy come spring.

Joel

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Joel,
Thanks for the good word on the Power Crystal. I picked up an acrylic striker this year, partially due to my experience with the carbon striker. Never had much confidence in the carbon, like you say "too much slip" and always liked the wood striker tones better. Last year our season was pretty damp and had problems keeping the strikers sounding well, had to use the carbon some but again, didn't have much confidence in it.
Sorry to hear you didn't get a tag. My wife didn't get one either so I guess our quest to get her first bird bagged will have to wait. Hopefully she'll be witnessing me bow-ing my second-ever bird this year. Sounds like you will still get your fair share of turkey hunting.
I know what you mean about getting things out too early. I'm surprised by the fact that I don't intersperse yelps, clucks and purrs in normal conversation! Or that I'm not found somewhere curled up, glassy-eyed, and mumbling something about whether or not I just heard a gobbler!

Best of Luck to all!!

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      There should be three components in the work: the introduction, the argumentatively proved thesis, and the conclusion. There are no strict requirements for the arrangement of the components: the thesis can go to the conclusion, but the main task of the author is to ensure the logicality and integrity of the 99 papers reviews. Do not forget when using references to other people's work to mark it with appropriate references, and do not overload paragraphs - each should be marked one complete idea or argument. Introduction This is your calling card, a chance to interest the reader: with a word or phrase, a bold quote to hook and arouse curiosity, without deviating from the main thesis. Use a rough draft, because it is easier to find an interesting "hook" for the introduction while working on the essay, and then put it in the introduction. Remember the popular saying that a worthwhile thought always comes later!   Don't "pour water"; try to use words directly related to the topic of the essay. Mistakes: Blank. Applicants commit the sin of quoting popular people, telling primitive jokes, or using headlines and facts from the media that are annoying to the review committee. Such an introduction will not arouse positive emotions. Dry facts. The task of the introduction - to arouse interest: do not hesitate to be emotional, because the restrained presentation of the facts will leave the reader indifferent. Thesis When choosing a thesis statement, it should be firmly understood that it is not a scientifically proven fact or the result of conducted experiments and observations, but the main idea of the essay, which can be expressed in a few words. To be sure you have a thesis statement, imagine: the examiner put your written work aside and, without reading it, asks you what the main idea is. The two or three sentences you will need to answer are the thesis statement, a summary of the entire essay.   The topic offered in educational institutions often has different interpretations and approaches. You are not faced with the task of finding an unambiguous solution to the question posed - remember that they want to know your personal point of view, test your ability to think logically and be intellectually savvy. It is acceptable to quote from the works of any researcher or philosopher, explaining your understanding of their hypotheses and how they reflect the thesis of the paper. Prioritize unquestioned authorities: Aristotle, Einstein, Socrates, 20th century academics - do not use recent scholars, especially media darlings. Mistakes: To be or not to be? An overly philosophical approach to the problem will lead to a loss of firm ground and turn the essay into meaningless abstract reasoning. State a concrete, not too radical opinion. Argumentation There should be several reasons determining your position on the question posed: describe each of them in detail in a separate paragraph, trying to observe the semantic sequence. Do not deviate from the topic and do not forget that if the logic of the work requires it, the thesis can be placed in the last paragraph. Play on contrasts and contradictions, denote the inconsistency of the commonplace view of the subject with the scientific one, put an obstacle that is not easy to overcome. Give priority to students who not only know how to solve a problem, but also how to discern it. Mistakes: Questionable argument. Remember that the very notion of an argument implies that it is true - you should not cite someone else's speculation as evidence. Don't repeat it twice. The same idea, in other words, expressed in a different paragraph, will give the impression that there is nothing to say. Conclusion In conclusion, you should not repeat what has already been written - briefly finish your thought, write a thesis statement if you decide to leave it for last. The conclusion should be polished and elegantly summarize the previous reasoning. A good way is to share the experience of writing this particular essay: tell what proved to be the most difficult, what ideas you had to discard during your reasoning, and which ones were a revelation to you. Mistakes: New arguments. The conclusion is to summarize all of the above, this part does not imply the appearance of additional arguments: if there are still thoughts, add an additional paragraph. It will be superfluous to describe the structure and content of your work at the end - they speak for themselves. The conclusion is intended to give the reader a sense of completeness and completeness.   Related Resources: Differences between essays and other creative works Checklist for a good essay The difference between an essay and a term paper Structure of the essay
    • williamnielsen
      And here is another site that I will add to the favorites list. I'm glad I found these satirical essay topics so quickly. Perhaps now I will not have to surf the web anymore.
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