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WHAT ARE YOUR OPINIONS ON THE PONDLEAF IN RUSH LAKE? DO YOU THINK THAT IT IS BEING TAKEN CARE OF PROPERLY? SHOULD HOMEOWNERS BE POLICED ON WHAT CHEMICALS THEY SHOULD OR SHOULDN'T BE ABLE TO USE? WHAT ABOUT THE OFF-SHORE TREATMENT?

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CorynTracySellHomes

Hey Eye!

Good topic! I wanted to talk to you guys more the other day at the meeting and get more of your input on what we should be doing with the Curly Leaf Pond Weed. You have been up on Rush a heck of a lot longer than I have so I would like to talk to ya sometime about what Rush was like before the Pond Weed, and after. Lets see if we can come up with a plan to either deal with the pond weed that does not hurt the lake, or, try and convince them that it should stay. I woul like to hear your thoughts on the matter.

Cory

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CorynTracySellHomes

For those that do not know.
Curly Leaf Pond Weed is an exotic weed that is in both East and West Rush Lake. It grows as a canopy and creates thick mats of weeds on the surface. Causing some boaters problems. This is not my concern for the weed. My concern is the heavy algae bloom that occurs when the plant dies in early summer. As it dies and decays it takes oxygen from the water, and creates phosphorus loading by sinking to the bottom. Currently, the Rush Lake Improvement Association has a company that comes out in late spring to spray the offshore pockets of these weeds. Offshore means it has to be at least 150 yards from shore. The idea behind this spraying is to try and kill off the Curly Leaf Pond Weed so natural vegetation can take its place. There are also a lot of lake shore owners that have there shoreline treated by companies, and also treat the lake themselves. It is perfectly legal for a homeowner to do that, if they get a DNR permit. Now, Legally they can do this. But, should they? I think to many lake shore owners buy a place on the lake, and forget that it is a lake, Not a swimming pool. What maybe should be brought up to the DNR is a tightening of the permit process. How can they issue a permit for work to be done to the lake without actually seeing what is being done?
I hate to admit it, but, as a lake shore owner I did have my beach treated for two years. Not anymore! Everytime they were out, there is a sign stating no swimming or eating fish from this area for x amount of days. How can this be good for the lake?

Cory

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Guest

Cory; I used to fish the emergent weed line to the east of the channel every spring for Walters. It WAS a great spot before they started spraying that crap. I no longer fish it for the reasons you just stated. I put enough garbage in my system by choice, don't neeed any more incidental additives!!!

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Guest

Pokegama Lake just to the north of Rush gets a bloom of it every year as well. Actually, I can't think of many lakes that don't. I'm all for it on Pokegama because it is literally the only weed that grows in there the whole year. No cabbage, no coontail, not even milfoil. In my opinion it provides some critical habitat (in Pokegama) for spawning fish.

It's gone by the start of July, unfortunately for the fish. But, the lake association uses a weed cutter that extends the weeds life a little bit, though that is not their intention.

In lakes with native vegetation, I can see where it would be less than desirable.

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baited

For my opinion..the people who have been given the Lake Associations blessing have been involved with this lakes clean up efforts for years. They are certified, and probably have more to lose from improper applications than most homeowners. As a resident on the lake for more than a decade, my neighbors are dangerous with their store bought chemicals that "worked for uncle stan up north". These chemicals are supposedly only purchased with permits, but are not actually monitored by any means I can see.
More of a problem on Rush are the numerous failing septics, which drain into a nice mat of pond weed, and set and work like a festering pocket. aerial photos show these areas clearly, but there has been a concerted lack of enforcement for this problem. The combination of the two is hard to beat unless addressed together...

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CorynTracySellHomes

Good Point on the failing septic systems!

What should we do to adress this issue? Report our nieghbors? Or?? This is an issue that should be adressed, but how?
Any ideas would be appreciated! A few years ago a community sewer system was brought up, but, that was defeated.

At the last lake Association meeting it was brought up by two gentleman to use a harvester instead of chemicals. I know with Millfoil that approach is detrimental because it just spreads the weeds. Would it work with Curly leaf pond weed? I don't know? It should be investigated though! It was said that the weeds harvested are considered hazourdous materials? That also I don't know. But, it may not be a bad idea to look into what the cost of harvesting versus spraying would be and look a little deeper at the pros and cons of each application would be!

This is really a great topic, one that does not just effect Rush Lake, but one many lake owners face throughout the state!

Cory Frantzick

------------------
Visit us on the web at www.Athomeonthelake.com

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CorynTracySellHomes

What a shame.

The lake is the reason all of those homes are there. One would think that they would take pride in that fact and not want to do anymore harm than necessary to the lake. Now, the latest study from Blue Water Science (The company that has been evaluating Rush Lake) downplays the septic issue. Stating that it is a contributing factor, but by no means is it a smoking gun. From what I understand from the report, the curly leaf pond weed, carp, and 2 streams in the NW part of West Rush Lake are the biggest contributors of phosphorus to the lake.

Cory

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Rush lake has been algea ridden since as long as i can remember.pond leaf was then not even an issue.I personally believe the offshore pond leaf is not a significant enough amount to contaminate an entire lake system.most points and humps do not contain enough acreage as compared to the shoreline.I have heard there is a tethered roller system which by rolling across the bottom will uproot bottom vegatation.

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CorynTracySellHomes

Is there a way to grab vegetation after it's rolled?
My only concern with that would be the amount of silt that would be disturbed with a system like that, and than we would have phosphorus in the lake that has been dormant for years?

Cory

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baited

It is funny to read back in the history of Rush Lake, the phosphorous question was kicked around in the 50s, at which time part of the problem was thought to be left over from the old logging encampments on the lake. Could still be! The lake is mentioned in a lot of old newspaper articles, and always the mucky bottom is brought up. Blue Water has been around a long time, and are a good group. The septics are surely not the only source, but are a more easily (physically) handled situation than the north streams. Funny we are talking about this, when after this last freeze, an estimate by local sanitarians is putting freeze up, and consequent failures of mound systems at 1 in 3. The algae has also been here forever it seems!

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baited

I am sitting here thinking, and reading other posts of course!, but people have complained about the phosphorous in Rush forever...the algae bloom, forever, the pond weed is a new one. The old timers from the 50s talk about the size of the fish being so much smaller, but since the phosphorous is the same, probably, the algae the same, and the pond weed too new to make a huge impact..could the constant and increasing pressure on the lake overall be the only factor decreasing the size and availabilty of game fish...maybe none of the above factors make a difference, but everyone has to admit, the popularity of the lake has become immense.

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baited

It really should not have to get into a reporting of the neighbors thing, but this has been done over the years on some of the larger, obvious places. Unfortunately, even when these places have been reported, the county steers away from controversy it would seem, with no action taken. We have had open, above ground sewage, very visible, very public and yet no actions.
The aerial photos were, and I assume still,
available at the county level. Arguments were made at the time that more study needed to be funded, from somewhere, to do more study..it goes round and round. No one is willing to take responsibility for cleaning up the situation, too hot a topic for many who had good intentions during the sewer project, and were tarred and feathered by their neighbors. Many were in it for the right reasons, some might have been in it for profit, now the idea is not pc enough for anyone to touch it.

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swampman

this type of weed can go away on its own not saying it will but i have seen it come and go on other lakes before.

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CorynTracySellHomes

That is really interesting about the old logging encampments! That area is rich in history, and would love to see more of it in print!
Just playing devil's advocate here? But, could the money spent on the Curly Leaf Pond Weed be better spent on improving the Nw Streams, or creating more wetlands for them to filter through?
maybe spend the money on purchasing permament easements along those streams for just that situation? I don't know?
From all reports, Rush has always been a fertile lake. And fertile lakes are generally very good fisheries.
As for the size of the fish now versus in the past, I would have no idea, having lived in the area a relatively short time, but, the immense fishing pressure would have to take a toll on the lake. It's happened time and time again on every other lake in Minnesota. I have been pleasantly surprised by the quality of the fish in the lake, but, that does not mean that it will go on forever like that. Too many people keep everything they catch, and Unfortunately the majority of the fisherman would choose to keep a limit of 10-12 inche crappies over 8-10 inchers. Or a limit of 18-20 walleyes versus 15-17 inchers. Peoples mentalities need to change. Those bigger fish are vital to make any lake a healthy fishery. The biggest problem is pike, I was impressed with the average size pike in Rush Lake, and having a bigger predator like nice sized pike and muskies are scientifically proven to be VERY beneficial to a lake. I would LOVE to see the DNR implement there new slot regulations for Pike on Rush.

Cory

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Guest

Be careful what you wish for Cory! pretty soon they are going to count watching Linder on the tube against your bag limit!

ROFLMAO!

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CorynTracySellHomes

Good point!!


Than I would be in big trouble!!!!!!

Just throwing out ideas!

Cory

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CorynTracySellHomes

Hey Eye Exist!

Shoot me an email when you get a chance, or give me a call. I have some information on mechanical harvesting of Curly Leaf Pond Weed versus chemical that I think you would find very interesting!

Cory Frantzick
[email protected]

------------------
Visit us on the web at www.Athomeonthelake.com

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Guest

cory,give this some thought.blue water science says pondleaf is a phospherous contributor but when it is treated then dies where do you beleive the leaf goes,does it just disappear. no the majority will sink to the bottom anyway right ? so how do we gain on the algea problem that way.again the only one who benifits is the lakeshore owner. if the leaf is removed it cannot add to the problem. clear water will bring back native growth

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CorynTracySellHomes

I agree wholeheartedly with that statement! How much of a difference do you think it could make to the lake if all of the shoreline owners removed the dead weeds that wash up on there shore, before that sink to the bottom and decay. It amazes me every year to watch the algae form, first in the spring the lake has incredible clarity, than, the first stretch of warm weather you start seeing these sheets of algae rising up from the bottom, (looks almost like a thin sheet of muck) than bam! The lake is coated in slime. I think it would be interesting to see what the price difference would be with harvesting versus spraying, and to see what a difference there would be in clarity. The big problem I could see happen with harvesting is to be careful where Millfoil is already present and stay away from that area. I don't know if it ever would be possible but, I would love to see thick beds of cabbage weeds, or some other type of weed in the lake.

Cory Frantzick

------------------
Visit us on the web at www.Athomeonthelake.com

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CorynTracySellHomes

Also...
Have you noticed a size difference in the crappies this year versus years past?

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