Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

Motor storage?


Slyster

Recommended Posts

Welp! A few more weeks and my 15 hp/2 stroke motor takes a nap. I will sure miss fishing...

What am I supposed to do?

I have heard "fog" the engine.. I have no clue what that means.. but I can read product instructions for that one... I also know to run it out of gas (disconnect the line).

- Change the gear oil now? Or in the spring?

- Keep it in basement? (room temp) or do low temps not hurt motors at all?

Any tips? I want this thing to last a lifetime!

How about electric motor... any requirements? Battery inside I assume.. does it need charging for those 6 months or just store it with a full charge?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I usually fog the motor on my last trip of the year I remove the air box and spray the fogging oil into the carbs reinstall the air box and into storeage she goes also change the lower unit oil right before storing the motor that way if there was any water in the lower unit you would not have to worry about freeze cracks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To properly fog a motor, pull the spark plugs and shoot a spray of fogging oil into each cylinder. It keeps the rings lubed during storage. And yes, always drain the lower unit and refill. You should also pull the prop and check for fishing line to avoid future seal problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you buy the fogging oil it will have instructions on the can. Try and get some in the carb too. Put some fuel stabilizer in the gas, and run it for a while so it gets into the engine. I would store it inside if its not to mutch trouble to get in. Batteries should be kept inside. Check them every month, and charge if needed.

------------------
Why did'nt Noah swat those two mosquitos?

Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure you do things in the right order. The above posts were a little confusing.

First fill your tank, put stabilizer in it. Next run the motor on the stabilized fuel for a few minutes to make sure the stabilized gas gets through the motor.

Next, pull the plugs and fog the cylinders.

Next, make sure the motor is vertical to ensure that water drains out of the water pump.

Then check the lower unit oil. If it looks like oil then you DO NOT have to change it. To turn this oil milky, it only takes 2 or 3% water. Because the water is emulsified, there is no risk of freeze problems at less than 3% water. Therefore if it isn't milky, then your below 3% water and you don't have to change it. I change mine once a year regardless of the condition, but it doesn't have to be part of the winterizing process.

The fuel tank should be stored OUTSIDE. It is not only safer, but the cold reduces the volatility and increases the life of the fuel.

Battery should be stored inside in a cool dry place (concrete floor of basement is fine) and should be on a trickle charger or periodically charged to keep it at full charge.

It doesn't hurt the motor to store outdoors.

[This message has been edited by wastewaterguru (edited 10-04-2004).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also have a 15 horse two stroke and I was wondering do you have to flush the water pump or is that not needed for winterizing?

[This message has been edited by rapala (edited 10-04-2004).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of things. One, don't store your battery directly on a concrete floor as this would discharge it, put a piece of wood under it. Two, pull the spark plug wires off and turn the motor over a few times when out of the water, this will turn the water pump and help drain any water out of the system.
Outboards are self-draining, but I always get a little additional water out by doing this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Storing your battery on cement will not "discharge" it. Back before 1967 most battery cases were made of hard rubber. Batteries back then didn't hold a charge nearly as long as they do now. The rubber case along with a frozen cement garage floor would often freeze the electrolite in the battery thus making it usless.

If your garage is warm enough then it should be ok. I put mine in the basement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a 4 stroke add changing oil and filter to the list. Also I take the boat off the trailer 1 last time and check all rollers etc. are working well and on tight.
Then I hope I get a day where I can wash/wax the whole deal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with "turning the motor over after fogging" with the spark plugs still removed.

This will ensure oil gets to all areas of the cylinder walls.

Wastewater:

How do you "check" your lower gear lube without losing any from the lower unit?

Once you lose any from the lower unit, you would want to replace it, as it would leave an air pocket otherwise. And if you're going through that much trouble, you might as well replace it all.

I do agree with the 2-3% water part.

On filling the tanks and using stabil: Stabil will protect gas, but only to a certain degree. The reason it is recommended to "fill" the tank is so condensation doesn't have any surface areas to form on, putting water in the gas.

I typically leave the tank 1/2 full, add stabil, run the motor, and then shut it down for the winter.

Come spring time, I use isopropyl water remover, 1/2 tank FRESH gas, and a can of sea foam.

Motor runs great.

But I do question, are there any opinions on using iso in a 2 cycle?

------------------
Good fishing,
UJ
[email protected]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think there is any problem using ISO in a small amount.
All the suggestions are great, and exactly what needed to be done. I usually disconnect fuel line at motor while running it for last time, so carbs will be empty. Lower unit oil: you can use any generic (Walmart) 80W90 gear oil to replace it when winterizing, then use regular lower unit oil (which is almost same) in spring time.

Beware all these instructions are to preserve motor the best way possible, they might seem too excessive, but I rather spend a saturday morning doing it well, than cut corners and have motor at dealer in spring with problems due to bad winterizing.
Lower unit with little water in oil will freeze with cold, expand and crack case, very common problem, replace oil ($ 5.00) and you are safe, otherwise it can cost up to $ 1,500 for a new lower unit...

------------------
Val Vignati

www.kvesurplus.com
[email protected]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a couple of things i would add. there should one or two grease zerks on the pivot points. give them a pump or two from a grease gun. and i always spray the engine compartment with WD40 as a drying agent on all of the wire connectors and such as the last thing. del

Link to comment
Share on other sites

all I do for storage of mine in the winter is drain ALL of the gas out of it even the tank change the lower unit lube and put it away for the winter. I store it outside so thats all i do. I take all three batteries out make sure they are fully charged than I make sure they are up every other month thats all I do for the winter that it I have never had a problem in I dont know how many years

Big Fish Hunter247

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last fall I ran some RV antifreeze through my livewell pumps & bilge pumps, too.

Again, maybe overkill, but who wants to replace pumps in the spring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the tips!! I'm sure this will help many others as well. My boat and motor will be happy all winter.. smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the posts above are correct and you should do everything. My comment is that you should change your lower unit oil. In my view oil is cheap and new oil will prevent any problems caused by freezing and the age old question "did I the oil change last year or not". This job is easy and can be completed in less than 15 minutes. Your local boat shop will have a oil pump with a hose that has a fitting that you screw into the bottom hole. Makes the job a snap. Motors can be stored outside with no negative effects. Just make sure you cover the powerhead to keep snow, ice, dust and varmits out.

------------------
If your are lucky enough to go fishing; you are lucky enough.

[This message has been edited by Animal (edited 10-06-2004).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.