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Red Line vs Red Hook


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Something isn't adding up for me on this Red Hook thing. They advertise Louisiana Red Line as invisible in the water. The red hooks are advertised to simulate a injured fish and be visible. I”ve looked at the red line and the blood hooks and they are almost dead on in color. Anyone have any insight or opinion on this?

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Interesting.....

I do know, thanks to science classes, that Red is one of the first colors on the spectrum to vanish.

Could it be that the reason red hooks work so well is that they become invisible underwater?

Has anyone viewed red line or hooks with a cam at depths over 15 feet deep? This is something we should look closer at.

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I wondered this very thing at Cabela's this weekend. Its funny how they advertise the red hooks as "blood hooks"...giving the impression it is an attraction to fish, where as they advertise the Cajun line as "disappearing underwater". Hopefully someone can help with this one...

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The only thing I can tell you about red hooks, its that they worked real well on LOW this past winter. seem to out fish plain hooks.

O

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I've never put much stock in red hooks cause the bait covers them up anyway.I thought people liked them cause they looked like blood, I never thought they could be invisible. I'll watch this thread with interest, I hope someone knows something about it.

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From all I've read about this it seems that red stands out the best in under 5 foot of water(depending on clarity) ,now when they say red is the first to be lost in the light spectrum to me this would indicate that it does not become invisible. It would turn a shade of gray or something,but not become "invisible". But heck if it gives you confidence why not try it.

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Somebody correct me if I'm all wet, but I'm sure I have read in different places that red is also the first and easiest color for a walleye to see in dim light conditions?
Paul S

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You are right, it does not dissapear, it only looses its color. Gray is the result.

That's a good point Paul, I'm not sure what "color" red is in low to no light conditions. It's kind of hard to know what walleyes actually see. I know there has been tons of research done on this, but we still dont know exactly what a walleye sees, it's only speculation and educated guesses brought on by countless expieriments.

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Now this is a good question. Tom's right, red's the first color to be filtered out underwater. Although "how deep" red Cajun Line becomes clear/transluscent depends on water clarity and light penetration. Apparently, line color in this case gets filtered out between 3 and about 12 feet of water. Again, though, I'm wondering exactly what separates this Cajun Line from any other clear/transluscent monofilament. Cool concept for a fishing line, though.

As to hooks, I usually don't get real excited about colors. Red hooks don't turn invisible underwater, but rather, become particular shades of grey-- as the hook itself is a solid steel object that reflects light (rather than one that absorbs light like transluscent monofilament).

Indeed, though, Paul, you're right about walleyes' acuity to perceive certain colors more vividly than others, particularly during dim light. Oranges and reds both lie at the top of this list. But how important is this info, really, if these "attractive" colors become grey at depths we usually fish walleyes anyway? Intriguing. smile.gif

-a friend called Toad

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