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Off Topic again: Colon Cancer!


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I just found out that my dad has colon cancer. He's about 62. I know that FM is mainly men (which colon cancer seems to effect more men than women) and I wanted to know or if anyone is willing to share any info about colon cancer?

He had a colonscopy done on Tues and that's when they found it.

He's seeing a specialist today and I believe to schedule surgery. Is Chemo not far away? What other treatments?

I'm pretty scared for him and wanted to know if anyone out here in FM went through it and lived or knew someone or any info.

Thank you for responding
Your FM family member EBass.

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I have not had colon cancer nor have I known anyone who has. But I wish you and your family good luck and we will keep you in our prayers.

God Bless
Chev

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Ebass, I'm not very knowledgable on colon cancer, but I do know my grandmother had it when she was in her mid 60's, in the late 1960's. She had surgery too. The good news is, she lived til she was 88 years old. She did have a bag connected, and her diet was specialized, but she seemed to get around pretty well. Hopefully the medical options and procedures are even better now.

Your dad will be in my prayers. Hope all turns out well for him and your family.

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I don't have any words of wisdom about colon cancer, but I hope things work out well for your dad!

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I have a very good friend that went thru the same. He is alive and doing well (for and 80 year old man). He has been cancer free now for about 20 years. What a man! All that and a WW II vet to boot.
He lives in southern Minnesota, probably never been on FM. I am inviting him to visit me up north this summer for some fishing. I am sure he will come.
Never give up on hope.
PRAY PRAY PRAY!!!

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e-bass. yes your dad is looking at a rough road ahead. usually it does include chemo and some times radiation. my uncle ( he is like a second dad) went through it five years ago.it hasn't come back. the good thing is , if they catch it early then his chances are very good of being cancer free afterwards. he is going to need moral support .keep your chin up. modern medicine is capable of great things. your family does have our prayers. and you have our support! del

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First off, my thoughts and prayers go out to him and your family. My grandpa was diagnosed in 1977 with colon cancer. He was given 6 mos. to live. He fought it and beat it. He ended up passing away in 2001 from a different illness. The key with any cancer is to fight, fight, fight, and keep your loved ones close.

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Ebass, my wife has been a nurse on a cancer floor for 13 years and I can tell you that if this is all you know about his condition you need more info. If caught early enough his prognosis should be excellent, but if it has progressed too far he is in trouble.

This sort of thing taps the strength of the whole family, so you need to pull together. Best of luck to you all.

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Ebass, I am sorry to hear this bad news, however, you hopefully will find that things will eventually be OK. I think your best plan is to rally the family for the best support possible, as this will be the beginning of a long road to hoe, and also, get with his Dr. and make that person your new best friend. Find out the details and take it one day at a time. I know this is very tough but remember, tough times don't last...tough people do.
I just talked to an avid fisherman about age 70 and he had a piece of his colon removed just recently. Well, he seemed as optimistic as ever and planning on moving on as if he just went in for a tune-up on the car, so there is room for optimism I hope.

Lakeman

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Sorry to hear your bad news ebass. I hope everything works out for your dad.

Remember we have one of the top medical facilities in the country in the Mayo Clinic. My dad had gone there twice and and they treat him very well. He has been to other hospitals and will not go back after going to Mayo. He was having a heart problem and drove 3 hours just to go to Mayo. Not wise in his condition, but that is how loyal he is to the place.

That and they are always on the cutting edge of medicine. My dad has participated in a couple of studies and has recieved procedures that were not available anywhere else.

Also, their website is very good.

Try these for info:
www.mayoclinic.com
www.ama-assn.org
www.intelihealth.com
www.emeryhealthcare.org
www.cancer.org/

Hope everything works out well for your family.

[This message has been edited by walleyehawk (edited 04-22-2004).]

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FWIW I've heard they have a "virtual" colonscopies now, which are not as intrusive as a "real" one is, and I've heard that they are actually more accurate then the ole standart method, of course if they find something in the virtual one, they then need to do a real one. So now guys, there are no reasons to not get them done every so often, ask you doctors, they can catch this early on.

I'll have your father in my prayers.

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EBass,
Sorry to hear. My dad past on in 1981 from a 16 month battle of colon cancer. They have come a long way with colon cancer these days. If it was detected early, there is a better chance of survival. If it runs in your family...getting tested the younger you are the better. I just got tested for the first time this past October, I'm 37. Everyone don't put it off. Get tested!

Bruce

[This message has been edited by Tofishem (edited 04-23-2004).]

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Ebass,

One of the things that will determine the severity of your dad's case will be when they remove his lymph nodes and do a study of them to see if they contain cancer. I've had some family members recently deal with colon cancer and depending on whether the cancer has reached the lymph nodes or not is a big factor on how it will be treated. If cancer is not found within the lymph nodes it's a very high probability that the tumor within the colon can be removed and that will be the end of it. If cancer is found, chemo treatment is almost guaranteed and problems are more likely to be found elsewhere.

Good luck to you and your family in the future. Hopefully it has been contained and can be easily treated.

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EBass,

Sorry to hear the news about your dad. I know what you guys are going through. About 2 years ago my dad called and told me he had colon cancer. He had a big tumor and it had spread to his liver and other places. He had the tumor(s) removed and then talked to many doctors about his chemo to treat the rest. Since it was found so late, the odds were not very good for him. He ended up going to Duluth and seeing a Dr. Crook (sp?) in the oncology department. (I beleive St. Mary's hospital.) They put him on an experimental drug for the chemo treatments. My dad would get the treatments every two weeks. The treatments would last about 48 hours, but he didn't have to stay in the hospital, which was great. He would wear a pump and it would pump the medicine into him every few minutes or so. The pump looked like a cassette walkman so you couldn't even tell he was wearing it. My dad would get tired on his "chemo week" as we would call it, but on his off week he was able to walk in the woods, go hunting, or do whatever.

Like I said, that was two years ago this spring. He is still going for treatments, but it's only once a month now. As far as they can tell he is cancer free for now, but since it's an experimental drug they're not sure when to stop the treatments. My dad says that as long as he has no major side affects and it's killing the cancer, he'll do this as long as he's able to. He's back to work now and everything is coming back to normal.

If they found it early, the odds are pretty good that they can get rid of it. If it's spread, then talk to as many doctors as you can to get as many options as you can and don't give up! Attitude goes a long way. My dad has one of the most positive attitudes and I truly believe that helped. One thing is for sure...it will change both of your lives. You find out what is really important in life and what is just "fluff." My thoughts and prayers are with you...

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Again, sorry to hear that bud. I and the FM family will pray for your dad.

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EBass~Unfortunately I know what you're going through now, my brother (who I'm very close to and is like a second dad) is also almost 62 and two weeks ago was told he had colon cancer. He had the surgery, was in the hospital for a week and went back to work this week part time.

My thoughts and prayers are with you. If you would like to, shoot me an e-mail at [email protected] (Diane)

------------------
Drake Motel
drakemotel.com
(888)253-8501
[email protected]

[This message has been edited by Drake (edited 04-23-2004).]

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Ebass,
I am Sorry to hear that. The best thing I can tell you is it is time to get yourself educated as best you can and FIGHT this thing. Don't sit back and let your dad get treated. You and him need to become part of the team that is going to put this cancer into remission. Ask questions, ask for second opinions, ask what you can do to help. Stay active in the treatment.
The links that were posted before are all excellent. I am going to give you one more.
www.laf.com
That is the link to the Lance Armstrong Foundation. (He's the cyclist that had testicular cancer that had spread to his lings and brain and since has come back to be a 5-time winner of the Tour de France. He has a great shot at becomming the first man to ever win 6!)
If you need a little inspiration, I strongly suggest his 2 books "It's Not About the Bike" and "Every Second Counts" These books are easy reads and Lance has this "common man" way about him that says "hey if I can do this....)
Check out the website and get the books from your library I think they will help. Oh, and don't forget to get your dad fishin ASAP. It's good therapy!
web

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My fiance's grandpa had colon cancer ten years ago. He had a colonoscopy and is doing fine, cancer free today. He does wear a bag but that is of little inconvienience in retrospect. My grandma was diagnosed with colon cancer a year and a half ago. She also had it removed and is doing better now than she has for quite some time. She doesn't have a bag but does have loose bowle (sorry about the spelling). She says that over time it will get better. I would say to you, be optomistic!

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Unfortunately my family has lots of experience with colon cancer. I had two grandparents who died from it.

However, my mom was diagnosed with it in 1995 and she is still alive and kicking. She had to go through several major surgeries and in the end had to have a colostomy. She lives with the bag too but all in all it's a quality life - you are slightly inconvenienced and alive.

The biggest lesson we learned during all of this is that you just do not know until they go to treatment/surgery. My mom had 5 separate surgeries. Twice they told her she'd have to have a colostomy beforehand but she didn't end up having it until the last surgery. One time they opened her up to remove what they thought was a small tumor and came back 1/2 hour later and told us there was nothing they could do for her because they were not skilled enough. Yet, the next hospital she went to (Fairview Medical Center at the U. of MN.) was able to fix her.

There were at least three different times she went into surgery and we expected the doctors would come out and tell us they could not help. This never happened.

Once we were told the recovery would be 12 days and she was in for 65 days - two Christmases ago she was on the edge of death because the surgery took so much out of her and she reacted to the medicine - yet she recovered.

Several times she told us she was too tired of fighting it and wanted to give in - yet she somehow found the strength to fight the good fight.

She's alive and well now - she will still have checkups and it will be several years until we all feel like she's beat it, but just remember - until all the options are exhausted there is still hope. You can attribute it to whatever you want but at the end of the day you simply do not know what is going to happen.

And retain some perspective. There's still the chance that you will get hit by a truck going to visit the hospital. We've all got a check out date waiting for us, it's just a matter of time.

Use that time wisely. Go fishing for at least part of it smile.gif

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Ah man, thanks for all the support! I didn't think this many would respond. It's not something discussed daily ya know? And it's pretty personal.

I spoke to my dad this morning, this is after he saw the specialist yesterday. The preliminary tests said it's NOT CANCER!(but the Doc who found it said it was pretty likely it was)but they could have made a mistake and will test it again once the lesion is removed and I guess it's pretty large. So a big hunk of his colon will be removed.

It depends on how his colon will react after part of it is removed and that will determine if he will need the "bag" or not.

Yes it was dectected early. He thought he had food poisioning and was crapping grape juice, but it was blood! He felt really tired and lost 1/3 of his blood. He had a blood transfusion last Tuesday and they gave him two pints.

The doc also said that me and my brother have to get "scoped" now since it is in the family. And he told me all the horrid prep details and what happened during. I had no idea the colon was so big.

We'll know more about it after surgery and the tests come back.

Men are supposed to be checked when they turn 50 then every 5 years after that. Unless it runs in the family then I would imagine get checked younger and more frequent.

I'm 30 and will need to be checked this year, and same with my bro who is 34.

He seemed to be more optomistic today when I was talking to him which is a good sign, since I have personal issues I'm dealing with. (girlfriend dumped my ebass)

Once again I find myself thanking all of you for all the support, links, and experiences you all shared. I'll keep ya updated.

Now on to that topwater thread that is calling me!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

My dad has his surgery today and it turns out it was or is cancerous after all. My brother told me it was the size of an orange. They removed all of it so thats good.

He's in recovery now so we'll see what happens. Send a prayer if you remember.

Thanks,
Eric

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I know what you are going through right now. About 5 years ago my father-in-law was diagnosed with colon cancer. Before he went in for the scope they did a stress test and found out that he had 4 pluged arteries in his heart. The next day we took him to Fargo for a quad. heart surgery. 3 months later he had to have his colon operated on and they took out 1 ft of it. He is now 82 and could not be any better. It is amazing what they can do to our bodies nowadays. Keep your head up and keep us posted.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.

------------------
Keep the lines wet!

Woodman


Today's Tackle
Air Plugs

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I can't help you with any information about colon cancer, but I wish your dad, you and your family nothing but good news from here on.

I do know something about the test. I put it for quite some time after I turned the magic age, 40 for people with history, 50 for those who don't. I had all the reasons most people do – no time – I don’t have a problem – No one goes up there – ETC. I had no intention of scheduling a test until I was at my doctors office for an unrelated matter and he reminded by I had turned 50 and he was scheduling my test. I have to admit I was somewhat nervous about it, but decided it was the best thing to do medically. I would like to share my experience so some of you who are putting it off might feel more comfortable about having the test.

The test starts the day before at home when you drink the blow-out formula. You need to be home and you will not have time for anything else for at least 3 hours. I started about 4:30 PM.

I began drinking a gallon of cherry flavored liquid that my pharmacist had furnished. The stuff tasted like tasted like an odd flavored tang. I followed the directions and began drinking 8 oz every 10 minutes. After about 45 minutes nothing happened and I was beginning to think the stuff didn't work. 15 minutes later and for next two hours I found out that that cherry flavored liquid is powerful stuff. I didn’t venture too far from the old water closet. After the cleaning process is over you can’t eat until after the test. I was done and watching TV by 8:00 PM.

The next morning I showed up at the hospital where they checked me in and placed an IV tube in my right hand. After about an hour I walked down to the exam room where about 3 nurses had me lie down on a table. They told me to lie on my side and then Doc walked in and explained what he was going to do. I asked him why he was going to use the long tube when I had heard that there was a short tube test. He said that he finds all sorts of problems up higher and besides you would'nt do a chest X-ray on one lung would you? They connected a tube to the IV and 20 minutes later the Doc tapped me on the shoulder and said "You’re done and everything looked good". I got up off the table, sat in a wheelchair and they took me to the recovery room to get dressed. They don't let you go until you fart. The farting is caused by the air they inflate the colon with. There is no smell because there is nothing up there.

Of all the medical tests I have ever had this was a snap. There was no discomfort or pain. I was in and out in 2 1/2 hours. You have to have someone drive you home as you will still be under the influence of the drug they give you and they recommend you cool your jets for the rest of the day. I got home, took a nap for 2 hours and went for walk.

[This message has been edited by Animal (edited 05-03-2004).]

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Ebass, sorry to hear about your dad. As a pathologist, I have witnessed the scenario that you described. I am sure that the doctor doing the colonoscopy saw the large lesion and assumed that it was malignant. Apparently the biopsies were benign, but they represent only a tiny fraction of a tumor that big. Although that is a large tumor, tumor size really doesn't influence the stage of the cancer. Staging which determines treatment and survival is dependent on TMN. T stands for tumor extent, how deep does the tumor invade into the wall of the colon. If the tumor does not penetrate through the wall the prognosis is excellent. It has been my experience that many larger tumors actually don't invade all that deeply. N stands for spread to lymph nodes. Obviously if the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, additional treatment is necessary. M stands for distant spread which is of course worse, requiring aggressive therapy. I wish him the best and hopefully he will have an early stage lesion with an excellent prognosis and needing no additional treatment. I agree with animal, I havd had colonoscopy and it is no big deal. If you have any questions that I could answer, just let me know.

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E, I will be praying for your Dad and your family as well. Keep us posted.

Thanks to all who reported on the testing procedure. I'm 39 and have been considering this. The usual fears invade and I put it off(I'm adopted, so no applicable family records for me). I remember hearing a guy interviewed once on a TV program on colon cancer. He had cancer, and had put off taking the screening test for the same reason we all put off going to the doc...especially in this case(test fears unfounded it appears). He went on to say something that bears repeating; to paraphrase, he basically said that if you are concerned about your diginity being assailed, it's nothing compared to what you will experience should you ignore the proper tests and later find out you wish you hadn't.

Wise words I think.

Not to laugh at your expense Ebass, but "she dumped my Ebass". That's funny.

I got dumped at the beginning of last summer. Guess when I returned "with a vengence" to fishing?

No more buying jewelry for the gal, the only jewelry I buy is lures for the tackle box.

Let's go fishing sometime.

------------------
SERIOUSLY! It was THIS big!

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Ebass, prayers out to your father and family for a good recovery.

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Again thanks for the support!! I always look forward to seeing who responded and what they had to say! Just posting shows your care.

Fishingfan welcome to FM and thanks for sharing your wisdom on this subject.

Yup Buz it's been a very crap year for me. Sure we can go fishing sometime.

I saw my dad last night at North Memorial. He looked good considering.. My brother and I hung out with him for awhile until he was too tired to talk. He kinda kicked us out, but he kept nodding off so I don't blame him. I'll see him again tonight.

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Wishing Dad, you, and the rest of the family lots of prayers and wishes for a speedy recovery and a long healthy life ahead!
Take care Ebass, can it be luck? smile.gif

------------------
http://groups.msn.com/canitbeluck

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