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Jigging Combo


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This question is for those of you that are good at jigging. What rod and reel combo's do you use? I want to start jigging more this year and I think the right unit makes a difference. Like how long a rod, L,ML,M excetra? What reel? And do you try to use a different combo casting jigs into shallow water versas verticial jigging. Thanks for any replies. Bobcat45

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I use a 6'2 medium for vertical jigging, fast tip, strong backbone.

6'9 medium light for pitching jigs, longer rod, better casts, better hook setting capabilities for me.


As far as the reels, you wont a need different style reel to match the application, just have a spool that will hold sufficient line. For me that would be 6-8 trilene xl.

[This message has been edited by Guido (edited 03-07-2004).]

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Jigging is all about "feel" and determining what's going on with the jig, so the answer is whatever feels the best to you. The reel is much, much less important than the rod and the line. Find a rod that you really like the feel of, experiment with different lines until you find one you like, and that will probably be the best for you. As long as the reel is balanced with the rod you'll be fine.

For me, most of the time I jig with a St. Croix 6.5 foot ML action with a Stradic 2000 with 8 lb Trilene mono. I catch most of my fish with this setup. I like the "softness" of the ML action and the mono, but it's too soft if there's much wind.

My other jigging rods are 6'2" Loomis medium action with a pinnacle reel, and 6'3" Falcon medium heavy with a Stradic 2000. The reel on the Loomis only has mono - the reels on the St. Croix and the Falcon have mono on one spool and fireline on the other.

A lot of guys like jigging with fireline, but I normally don't like jigging with it unless I'm in really deep water or it's windy. But I use fireline most of the time when I'm live bait rigging.

It all depends on what feels the best to you, then use that setup enough to tell what's going on - is the bait sinking fast, swinging on tension, swimming above the bottom, dragging on the bottom, on sand/mud/rocks/weeds, did a fish pick up the bait and give you slack line, etc.

Good luck - hope this helps.

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My choice set up is a 6'6" medium action Loomis IMX with a Daiwa Regal Z. For walleyes I always use 6 lb Trilene. The Daiwa reel is a bargain at $40-$50. I've used them for about 3 seasons and believe they perform much better than my other reels that sell for over $100. The rod is unbelieveable, very lightweight and very sensitive, top of the line. But the price is high, about $230. For a more affordable high end rod such as the Loomis check out Rogue Rods. I just looked them over at the sportshow. They look awesome and will save you $100 compared to the Loomis or St Croix. They all run the same rod blanks.

Jason Erlandson

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A few years ago I read a book by Mike McClelland who used to fish the PWT. He prefers short jigging rods for vertical fishing. He recommended below 6'0 so I have a 5'9 medium lite that I just love. I think the short rod give you better sensitivity and you can get a real quick set.

My fishing partners prefer the 6'6 rods, to each his own. Try and borrow a rod or two from a friend and see what you feel best with.

I agree, in jigging, reel is not worth spending huge money on. I go with the Shimano Sahara for $59 and it has been good so far.

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What are you jigging for? If it's walleyes, and I think that's what we all assume you're after, it is important to keep your line as light as possible. Pitching an 1/8 oz jig to a weedline is tough if you are using line that's too heavy. I use 6 or 4lb mono most of the time and the rod can really make a difference. I agree 6'6" is about right, but be sure it's rated for light line.

There are a lot of good spinning reels out there that aren't very expensive, but the long cast spool styles seem to really make a difference for the better, especially for casting light jigs.

If you're after bass none of this applies, you need heavier stuff for largemouths. I have lost some nice bonus bass while jigging weed walleyes because they burrow into weed beds and my 6lb mono can't drag them back out.

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Thanks for the replys. Yes it would be for wally's. 90% of my wally fishing has been with live bait rigs. Which I still don't claim to be an expert but am comfortable with doing it. I want to learn how to be comfortable with jigging. You guys gave me some ideas on what kind of rods to look at. I agree with using a longer rod for pitching. to me that makes sense. Just trying to cut out some wasted time and money doing the wrong thing. I can't wait to practice! Thanks again! Bobcat45

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I like a 6'6" St.Croix Avid in Lt or Med/Lt power and fast action. A 1000 series real in either Okuma, Shimano or any other real with a good drag and anti reverse is a must.
I jig a lot with Fireline but also like Trilene Xt or Xl depending on if Im in rock or timber or not. Xt is great for abrasion resistance. Xl is limper and great in open water.
You will find once you use a high quality well balanced jigging combo nothing else quite feels right. But as anything go with what you can afford. The fisherman is and always will be the most important piece of any combo. Nothing replaces practice.

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Bye the way early007 Iv'e heard people talk about the Rogue rods before. Where does a person look at these rods besides the Sport Show?

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