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Carrer Change?


Crawlerman

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I don't know where to put this... so I'll just post it here. I know this is not directly related to fishing... but I think a few here might know a little bit about the subject?

I'm not exzactly having a 'mid life crisis' as I am a young man, but I am finding it EXTREMELY competitive in the IT field, espically in my generation.

I've allways had a mechanical mind.. and have been good at troubleshooting problems. So I am curious on what the market is like for something like an Outboard Mechanic? And if this would mean you would pretty much have to start your own business, or if any of the marinas and such in this area are in the need for them? I have to be honest.. I know very little about outboards other than a few basic maintence things like changing the oil on the lower unit and cleaning/replacing the prop. But I am willing to learn...

Just something but blue collar work for the rest of my life... ick....

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Crawlerman, sounds like your mind is in the same place as mine. Went to Engineering school for 4 years, became an electrical engineer working on electronic controls in a mechanical world for the past 3+ years. Now I realize that I would rather be doing something different, working in some other area of business. I would really love to become involved in the marine industry too, some way some how. Either through an engineering standpoint, or through marketing and sales. I am already sick of sitting behind a desk everyday,..man I don't know how people do this for 40+ years!! Who knows but my eyes and ears are open to ideas at this point. If there are any marine related jobs out there I would be interested in them.

[email protected]

[This message has been edited by Grabs (edited 08-08-2003).]

[This message has been edited by Grabs (edited 08-08-2003).]

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Hey,
you've got mail!

Just so happens my "other" job is working as a Career Counselor. Not to say I have "the" answers or anything,but I sent ya somethng to nibble on.

Jim

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Add me to the list. I work in Operations and I am so tired of managing people, writing procedures, looking over budgets that I could puke. I would love to do something in the fishing/marine world be it sales, marketing...I should be around the things I love.

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My brother-in-law got an engineering degree and went to work for Toro. He got sick of it and switched to international marketing at Toro. Since then the guy has been to Australia, Scottland (for the British Open), Ireland, Spain, all over Canada, and he just got back from the Firecracker 400 where Toro had passes to the pitstop area for their guys. He has been a bunch of other places too. Absolutely loves marketing and with his engineering background actually knows what he is talking about when he talks about the product. It was a great move for him.

mm

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Well I for one am sick of going from job to job. Work 'til you hate it and go on to another and get laid off. I am starting college this fall at thirty seven years of age to get a degree. I have learned that all you can really get without a degree is a job. I need a career. I have always been interested in medicine so I am on my way to be a registered nurse. Quite a jump from the jobs I have held in the past. I would just like to wish everyone who has got the passion for something to find a vocation that will allow them to do something in which they can take pride and enjoy passionately!
God lyk!
JC

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Good luck with that Balckstar.
I gotta hand it to you for having the ambition and dedication to take on that task.

I am 36 myself and have this ignorant mindset that I could never last at college for that long, and If I could do it all over again, i would go right after high school to college for Radiologic technology, I think thats what its called, you know, cat scans , x-rays and such.
I know they offer this course in Detroit Lakes, but too far to drive for me everyday.
They offer it at NDSU, but its a four year course there, I believe the last 2 are more of an internship, but you have to qualify, which to me is saying, you better be one kick a$$ student and on the top of your class.
I have been welding for 10 years, and sick of the layoffs. Before that it was resteraunt managment.
Sick of both, but love to work with my hands, and get them dirty, HEH.
Bodies to wrecked up to take on anymore grunt back busting work.
Wish I could find that perfect job, but not sure if there is such a thing.

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Dano, have you checked into other medical programs? I checked out Rice Mem. Hospital in Willmar, and they have a 24 month Rad tech course. (wish I had known that, I thought that Ridgewater college dropped that curriculim years ago). You might want to check out local hospitals to see if they offer a course in Rad. Tech. If I wasn't looking for CNA jobs at Rice I would never had known that there was a local x-ray school. Oh and Aquaman, I have never been in such a great frame of mind until I was layed-off at the local brewery. That place would have killed me. Dano, you might want to look into grants for different programs. Until you do a lot of digging you never know what awaits.
God lyk!
JC

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Hey Blackstarluver, it sounds like you're going into the right field, I'm an RN myself, grew up out there in Willmar, now living in the cities doing 12 hour shifts-3 days a week, giving me four days a week to fish!!! I'd recommend getting your ADN and then start working, most hospitals here in the cities will pay 80-90% of your tuition to get your BSN. Right now the starting pay for 2 year degree RN is about $21/hr, but that is just the baseline, with overtime, which there is plenty of, you can add quite a bit to that.

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Blackstarluvr,

Funny that there were others thinking like me: I too am an RN, certified in mental health. The State of MN paid for my LPN and then I moved to Wyoming (the state)which paid for me to get my Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and anything else that I would go on to. Much like twenty four years ago when I was advised to consider nursing, the field is still wide open. Only now there are many grants, scholarships and employers lining up to pick up your tuition. What it would cost you would be that you have a job for a few years! Good luck to anybody who decides to work indoors, just chatting with people and plenty of available jobs in many different specialities. Nursing: it's not just for women anymore.

Kevin

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hey guys just reading your post! i'm on the flip side of this .( will retire in jan with 30 yrs at deeres in waterloo) i had a job, but nothing else. it is hard when you have family ; look for a field that you will enjoy and can make a decent living. there are always night schools. college courses over the net . as mentioned check with hospitals to see what is avaliable. many options. good luck del

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Man I have to jump on this one. I've been managing people for 11 plus years. Most days I just don't even want to go in anymore. Mr Pike and I call it being a "little man". There's got to be more to this than this, working 5 days at the office, one day at the house, and if your lucky get out for a little fishing. That's messed up. I've thought about guiding, but it sounds like I would have to give up the steady income. There's got to be something better out there for us "little men." Crawlerman, Grabs, and others, your not alone in your thinking. If I had the money I would be content selling bait, or even working at a resort, as long as I could be apart of the fishing industry.

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I'm getting tired of this gig, too. Yeah, it pays well enough to keep my wife at home raising our wee ones (priority one), but I'm far from 'fulfilled'. The first two years it was really challenging and kinda fun, and the last 1.5 years have become a big drag. There is no promotion ladder available to me, and every time a retiree from here stops by, they usually say something like "I feel better than I have in years. I don't know why I did it for so long!"
Encouraging, that is.
Ya know what I'd really love to do? I'd love to teach. Middle-school level World History would be great, or maybe English. Too bad the pay isn't what I need.
So, I better knock this diversion off and climb back into my running-wheel.

"It's not in doing what you like, but liking what you do that is a key for happiness" - some dead guy.

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
Peace and Fishes

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I just want to give an input.
A hobby is fun, a sport is great, but when they become a job.....it is a job, just like anything else, 5 days a week or more of the same routine.
Find something you will enjoy and give satisfaction, economically and intellectually, then stick with it.

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I am one of the lucky ones. I was a plumber & HVAC person for 16 years before I applied for and was hired as a plumbing & HVAC inspector. Sure, I'll never be a zillion-aire, but I don't mind coming to work every day, and I still get outside, rain or shine everyday. You guy's just put your mind to it and you'll get what you want out of life.

Good luck and keep positive.

Jeff

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So last night I got inspired - I mean big time, and it was from all things - a Disney movie I'm watching with the kids "Treasure Planet". This movie is a modernized version of Treasure Island, which I read as a kid but didn't really 'get' until I saw it last night.
Yer two main characters - Jim Hawkins and Long John Silver - both are in pursuit of this place full of reward that they've really only heard about, and have a strong clue. LJS has been searching his whole life and has sacrificed a few body parts to get there. JH is embarking on his journey and is learning, adventuring and testing his limits. In the end they only get what they need to get by, but along the way they learn & grow. Right now, I'm getting by just fine as a deckhand on someone else's ship, but I can't help feeling that part of my journey takes place at the helm of my own vessel. Nothing wrong with being a deckhand - but if the hat doesn't fit the hat doesn't fit.
Thanks Robert Louis Stevenson - I'll get right on that.

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
"The bow is set to distant shore,
then loss is gained and gains once more.
When beach is reached and sails are torn,
the journey is it's own reward."

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For the question about marine mechanics, my cousin works for Crystal-Pierz and has been loving his job. But I know he didn't go to school to get the job.

As for the hating the job well I haven't hated my job for about 2 years now. I'm on my second contract and hoping this will go full time. When I was hating my job I had lost sight of why I originally liked my job, worring in the lab, so now I look for a job where it is hands on. If you hate your job so bad that it is affecting you at home, get a new job. I wished I would've done it a few years ago.

If you need a place to look for job go to Monster. I have had about 10 calls on job opportunities.

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There needs to be a clear separation between a career/work and home. They are not one in the same. If it appears that way or if one is seeping into the other, issues will most likely
develop.

I don't believe there is a perfect "job" or career.

I always tell folk, I work so I can fish.
As soon as I am out the door after a long day working, I am no longer thinking about my "job". Not an easy task by any stretch of the imagination, but vital.

I guess you need to ask yourself, what is important to me and how much value do I place in my work? It is about you and often the employer, even though they might want you to believe, can find someone else to fill your shoes. Especially now in these trying times!

What ever you do Crawlerman and others, hold on to what you have now. Take the time to thoroughly research your needs, wants and future in and out of the work place, before hastily making a rash decision!

Uh oh, work has began sliding into my fun...better get out of here!!

Jim W

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Interesting topic. I guess I follow the advice that my uncle gave me many years while I was in college debating on a major. He said "I really don't like driving truck for a living but I make enough money that I can do what I want to do in my spare time". That statement, and the fact that I could see lots of biology grad students (they couldn't find jobs) around, made me switch from biology to business/IT. Twenty years later, I'm not rich, but if I want to buy a new shotgun, I can budget for it and buy it. And my job is still challenging. Granted I'd like to work outside, but how about those days when its 95 and humid or minus 20 out? Then my desk job isn't so bad.
I would like to work 3 or 4 days a week in order to get those longer weekends, but thats why they call it work.

To those of you that mentioned radiology or nursing, you're making a good choice, they're in high demand and the pay is very good. High demand translates into lots of opportunity to find a job in an area that you like and/or to dictate what hours you work, you can job hop easier til you find the right one.

Good luck to you all.

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Mykal and others,
I don't want to rain on anybody's parade but I have a perspective that I want to share. As the son of parents who ran a campground on Leech (1970-1976), a resort near Cohasset (1979-1982), and worked as a dockboy at Winnie resorts (1976-1979) and at Sugar Hills Ski Area (1979-1982)I would miss the service industry if I wasn't in nursing. I don't miss the small business headaches which often lead to big headaches. I also like that fact that I can go fishing or participate in other hobbies on a whim, something that can't be done when your livelihood depends on being very attentive at all times to your customers during your short season. Too many ex-business owners thought they could fish while their customers did, and I imagine the awakening was disappointing.
As others have stated it is important to do something that makes you happy so there is not just one career that we all can fit in. I look forward to eleven years from now when I can retire at age 53 and seek a job that allows more time to fish. I'm sure it won't be much different than my current one, or maybe I'll use my retirement to buy back that campground and live out my days where I first learned to fish...
Kevin

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I (when younger) wanted to open a bait and tackle shop, since fishing gear is a passion of mine. A forsighted friend told me that this was a good idea, providing I never wanted to go fishing. I inquired "Why" and he let me have it! Who is going to run the shop while you are out fishing? Hire someone and they won't have the vested interest or care about what they are doing as much as you. Or close the shop, go fishing, make no money. A while later, a new tackle shop opened and when I drove by on opener, the sign on the door read CLOSED GONE FISHING. It lasted only a couple months. I agree with seperation of vocation and avocation. Have a passion for a specific vocation and have another for a hobby, and balance the two. I worked at a pizza place once, making my favorite food, it didn't stay my favorite for long and took years to get back the desire for pizza.
Just my2
God lyk!
JC

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My situation is similar to Blackjack. I love the outdoors and enjoy being outside, but I also enjoy sitting behind a desk. My father told me to get a job that doesn't take a toll on your body. The weather is always 70 degrees in my office. If we could get paid to fish, we would all be rich. Do I love my job.....no, but I don't hate my job either and to me thats the most important thing. I guess the words to describe it is being content.

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I think JimW has provided some very valuable insight...and Aquaman01's thoughts, although based in Hollywood fantasy wink.gif, are right on, too.

I still don't know if I'm correct, but I came to the conclusion when I was about 19 that I really don't like working. In fact, I basically hate it.

A perfect job doesn't exist for me because, for the most part, I dislike far too many aspects of EVERY job.

I do think it is very important that a person figure out what it is they DO like in any job. Is it working with people, is it working with equipment, is it working alone with no supervision, etc?

It has taken me nearly 20 years, but I think I finally have figured out what things need to be present so I don't become bored out of my mind after six months. For me, that is the key to being mildly entertained by a job.

By the way, I've been looking for a new job for about two years--so don't think for a second that I've got anything really figured out.

A funny thing did happen, however, that I'll relate to you. A "dream" position came to my attention. I'm in sales....this new job was with a major outboard manufacturer....begins with a "Y". It was a local territory (only 4 states, compared to the 30 I now handle). I could call on boat manufacturers, dealers, marine shops, sporting goods folks...attending sports shows, fishing tournaments, on and on.

Dream job for folks like us, right?

Well, after looking at the entire package, I could quickly see that the job would have been horrible for me. 60-70 hour work weeks. Working many weekends. 75% travel. Questionable incentive plans. Extremely structured environment (duh! Japanese company!--didn't think about that) And, something I never really realized, no growth in the market (boat sales have basically been flat for years), which meant little income growth opportunity.

I was disheartened when I left the interviews, as my "dream" job turned out to be worse than my current job. Interesting lesson for me!

I wish everyone tremendous luck and lots of opportunity.

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