• RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
CrappieJohn

It's a niche thing...

Recommended Posts

CrappieJohn

When fishing we tend to use baits that appeal to the fish so they hit. Bait has the benefit of being alive(usually) and carries with it natural scent and movement. So where do we begin in our selection of plastic baits when they will have to compete with the real McCoy?
First, and more than anything, we need to consider the time of year and what we are persuing for fish. Plastics for crappies thru the ice can be microscopically small. Chasing the same fish in open water with those baits would be folly under most conditions, but in a post-frontal period we may have to scale down to these if we want to catch fish and bump them right on the crappie's noses. In a situation such as this, we are doing nothing more than filling a niche in the crappie's world that wasn't filled the day before the front because there was no need for it. Conditions dictate what we need to present to catch fish. Just as the tiny plastic has it's place in the tackle bag, so do plastics of a more substantial size. In the fall when the turnover is near or has just occurred, larger baits will fill the niche because the crappies are much more aggressive in thier feeding. Whether large or small, look at the plastic's size as a profile thing. The colder the water, the closer to a major front having just passed, the smaller the profile you will want to use.When they are actively feeding, regardless of water temp, do not be afraid to up-size to plastics that you think might even scare them...the rewards can be great by doing this. Filling a size niche is number one on the list.
The walleye/sauger brotherhood will find many, many plastics to use. Long ones, skinny ones, some with broad tails that spin like crazy, some that do nothing but get dragged behing the boat. Every one of these baits have proven themselves and fill a niche in the world of murk. Using the Mississippi as an example, the fall/winter fishing below some of the dams is simply stellar. During stretches of consistant weather without any fronts one can fish a fairly aggressive, thick profiled plastic in the deep-water runs and scour holes with great success, but try doing that up on shallow sand-flats and you will go fishless. The key there will be to use a narrower profiled bait and almost drag it along while tossing other baits on jigs into the real shallow stuff- again barely moving it. In all honesty, you can have two, maybe three, different water types within a hundred feet of water. Three different niches to fill. And again here, as with the crappies, post-frontal conditions can play havok with these niches and where yesterday you may have been using a three in twister, today you need to scale down to two inch.
People will say, now,"O.K., you talk about profile, what about color?" Indeed, color is a primary factor and indeed creates its own niche in the scheme of things. Color is only color to us. What the fish see is entirely different. They see degrees of white ,gray, and black. As a lure, say a red one, drops thru the water column, the thing will go from red to brown to a heavy shade of dark gray. Instead of looking at how gray the lure gets, look at how much CONTRAST the color change provides. There will always be some ambient light available, even at the deepest depth during the darkest night with the filthiest of waters! The niche of color is a tough nut to crack and will depend on how aggreable you are to trying different colors and combination. There is nothing in nature as black as the black paint on a jig and that is why they are so effective at night. The fish can see the contrast. So too are the glow paint lures. Instead of being blacker than thier surroundings, the glow products produce a positive contrast of light on dark. Now consider the wide color selection available and how untold hundreds of contrast senarios can be met and try to image how many niches are being filled.
Matching the hatch, filling a niche....they are one and the same. How well we do it is determined by our success ratio. When to look at filling niches can be governed by the time of day, the time of year, water temp, and even the weather. Is it no wonder then that I have a total of three tackle bags and three tackle satchels FULL of plastic? I don't carry the stuff that doesn't work. Everything I take fishing has proven to fill a niche on a consistant basis. Twenty years of trial and error have blessed me with some short-cut wisdom at sorting this puzzle out, but there are still times when attempting to master the match for a single day can be taxing.It always becomes a matter of filling a niche.


Good fishing guys...CrappieTom

[This message has been edited by CrappieTom (edited 08-22-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim W

Good stuff to think about Tom...Thanks!!!!!

Jim W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • BrianF
      I hope this analysis is wrong, but was doing some math trying to guesstimate when Lake V might go ice free.   As of today, the DNR shows only one lake in the state to be ice free: Pepin.  Pepin went out 20 days later than the median date and 4 days later than the nearest comparable cold year of 2013.   If we extrapolate this same delay to Lake V, then we are looking at an ice out in the neighborhood of May 20th or 21st.  Not quite the record, but close - and plenty late enough to screw up a lot of plans.  Like I said, I hope this analysis is flawed somehow.
    • scrubby1
      Hey Guys,   Just wondering if any lakes are open or close to being open?  Got the itch to get the boat out and wet a line! 
    • delcecchi
      St Louis county has something similar on their web sight (sic) https://gis.stlouiscountymn.gov/LandExplorer/  
    • Hoey
      This has been an interesting thread.  Walleye wings is new to me and I am going to do this to provide a different experience.  Thank you all for sharing!!!
    • Hoey
      ....just guessing, New Ulm?
    • AlwaysFishing23
      Good idea on the silicone spray definelty something to do every spring a big help to keep things sliding nicely. I use that stuff on anything that slides. On telescoping flip over poles for example.
    • eyeguy 54
      Pulled it up front and went to work on it. Silicone lubed everywhere.  Quite a task taking the steel cover off underneath that protects the main drive but got er done. Zips right up and down with the attachment I got for the drill. Nice!
    • mdogdaddy
      I found a very handy app for this. It's called onX Hunt Maps.  (I'm just a user) It's primarily designed for hunters that want to know where state/federal vs private lands are.  To see property lines etc. you need the paid (premium) version. The free version comes with a trial of the premium version for 7 days. But even the free version does quite a bit. It's pretty interesting for Vermilion because there is so much of each - private and state/federal lands. You can click on each parcel and it will even give the acreage, landowner names and tax address.  If I pull up to shore, I really want to know that I'm not trespassing. GPS works along with markers/waypoints. Maps can be stored for offline use so you  can use it without phone service or wifi. The free version comes with a trial of the premium version for 7 days. I added a zoomed out screen grab.
    • eyeguy 54
      cool, time for a short hike after lunch.  
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Starting a new thread for 2018 Pike River Hatchery progress. No new news today. Cliff