• RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
musky999

Fishing in Crane and surrounding area

Recommended Posts

musky999

I have been going to Crane the last 6 or 7 years the weekend after opener. We always do pretty good. Haven't found any big northerns though. Just curious what and where might be the best things to look for. Also what kind of fishery is Little Vermil. I have never been back that way. I have always fished Crane, Sand Point, and Namakan.

Thanks,
Musky999


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Enids Hubby

The biggest northern i've cought in crane was and 11 pounder.It was in the gorge area a week or so after opener 2 years ago . Most of the northerns i've cought have been on the west shore line by the green boat house. Little vermillion last year was better fishing than crane. I always try little vermillion and is pretty consistent for walleyes. best spot way down by the island on the american side . try the front corner where it drops suddenly to 20 ft . got a 20" walleye last year in that spot . troll with a gold spinner seems to work for me . also try between that island and shore around 25 to 30 ft was getting tons of crappies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
musky999

Thanks for that reply. Any big smallmouth caught be anybody that time of year. The biggest we have had is 19 inches, nice fish. It is so fun catching those smallies and putting them back in the water.

Thanks,
Musky999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
89Bronco

My biggest northern on Crane was a 38" on the north end a few years ago on a 1oz. Daredevil, yellow with red 5 of diamonds. I've caught a few 36" pike on gold husky jerks. I saw one caught in the little bay to the left just before you enter Sand Point that had to be over 40", and one guy hauled up a nice musky in the Narrows there also. For the most part though, I'm not sure if Crane has a lot of big (40") pike in it. I try to fish all summer, but I'd have to say that I catch most of them earlier in the year (May/June) and then in the fall (Sept./Oct.) when I'm hunting up there.

The biggest smallies that I've caught were 19". Both on a plain hook, slip bobber and leech up in the Gorge. I've caught a few of those on the north end also, but the biggest were in the Gorge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
d.roy

Not to question you in any way, but are you sure that you saw a musky caught in the crane chain of lakes? I'm pretty excited about that if this is a positive musky catch in these lakes. I've heard of people seeing muskies porpusing but never heard of one actually being caught. I don't think skis are natural to these waters but imagine they might make way via vermillion river from famed lake vermillion. I think these lake could support some big fish without a negative impact on the rest of the fishery. I'll be up at sandpoint lodge next thursday and can't wait to get there! Any other musky info would be great!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Enids Hubby

I know a person who guides occasionally for one of the resorts on crane and he cought a muskie by indian island on crane lake. it was not real big. I know he knows the difference between them . I've heard for a few years now that there are some muskies present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
89Bronco

d.roy,

Yeah, it was a musky, and you're right, I don't think they are natural to the waters of Crane. It is rare, but every so often you'll hear of someone hooking one. This was a few years ago. The guys brought it up in front of the Voyagaire (they didn't release it) frown.gif and laid it out on the grass there, so we got a good look at it.
My guess is the same as yours, a few must come down the river from Vermillion---but it's just my guess. You can check the DNR site. If I remember right, they even caught one in one of their surveys on time. (I could be wrong on that though!) smile.gif
I would never recommend Crane for muskies. They aren't there in any numbers.
Can't wait to get up there! Handberg's put the boat in the water yesterday and I'll be at the cabin Saturday. Anybody have general suggestions for the crappie on Crane?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Timber

I keep my boat at Handberg's also, and have been up to my cabin 3 or 4 times since ice out. Water is higher than last year. Made it easier to put my dock out. I would also be interested in knowing where the crappies are!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
d.roy

Yeah, we use handbergs too - they really do a great job there! I've no ideas on the crapps but would also love to get into them. I'm happy to hear the water levels are better this spring. I'll be getting to crane next thursday for a much needed fishing vacation. Any idea on how low the water currently is? Can't wait to get there, thursday can't come soon enough!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
musky999

Hi Guys,
Two years ago in the Gorge I saw someone catch about a 15 lb musky while walleye fishing. That same night we saw someone catch a sturgeon in the Gorge also. Both were releassed. The guy that caught the strurgeon broke his rod. Anyway, anymore comments on the northern,smallmouth, and crappie fishing the second week of the season.

Thanks,
Musky999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Timber

d.roy, if you remember the water-mark scale on Handberg's main dock, it's at approximately 16 as of a few days ago. I think it was around 13 last year at opening. Normal (again, I think) is 18.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hop sing

i caught a muskie up in namakan about 5 years ago. it was only a couple lbs. but it was a muskie. (released it). so they are there but in 15 years of fishing thats the only one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
89Bronco

musky999---
Are you going to be on Crane this weekend? Good luck if you go. I'm heading up Friday night and I can't wait!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
musky999

89Bronco,
We will be up there around 2:00pm on Friday and staying through Sunday late afternoon. We will be fishing out of a 185 Alumacraft with a 150 Yam.. Good luck to you too and maybe we will see ya.

Musky999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • guideman
      It is much warmer now and after watching 30 ice outs on Vermilion, I think Pike bay will be ice free in about a week and Big bay typically follows about 10 days later.  Warm weather and wind can melt ice faster that you can believe. There might still be some ice floating around by the opener however I plan on going fishing like always. "Ace"  
    • guideman
      I know from living on Pike pay for 27 years that this will be one of the latest, if not the latest start dates that I have seen. Good news my neighbors boat lift broke though the ice today and that typically mean that Pike bay will be open within a week. ;) "Ace" ;) 
    • leech~~
      Smoken!
    • smurfy
      so eyeguy.......you keep them? picklin material???????? to many bones for anything else!!!!   nice pictures.!!!!! how many line tangles already!!!😄
    • eyeguy 54
      Hello thursday
    • Smoker2
    • maxpower117
      No wake is in effect currently and will be for the weekend opener.  Spread the word. 
    • Pat McGraw
      I wouldn't read too much into the open water in Oak Narrows. There's been open water there for more than a month. There's clearly forces other than air temps or sunshine at work there. With that said, considering the data shared by delcecchi, and the current 15-day forecast I am not without hope.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Enforcement Division has promoted four officers – Chelsie Leuthardt, Brandon McGaw, Jen Mueller and Brett Oberg – to the position of regional training officer. They’ve been in their new positions since April 18.  The Enforcement Division’s six regional training officers are responsible for training the state’s conservation officers on topics such as defensive tactics, firearms and use of force. In addition, they train and work closely with the 6,000 volunteers who are integral to delivering the division’s education and safety training program. (The largest number of volunteers, about 4,000, are firearms safety instructors.) Regional training officers also spend a portion of their time performing the traditional field duties of a conservation officer. Following are brief bios of the newly promoted officers: Chelsie Leuthardt has been a conservation officer for four years and most recently patrolled the White Bear Lake area. “I’ve made strong connections with many instructor groups and look forward to working with them more closely,” said Leuthardt, whose area includes the southeastern part of the state. “I enjoy working with our user groups and helping to form how we train our next generations of outdoor enthusiasts.” Brandon McGaw has been a conservation officer since 2007. For most of that time, he’s been stationed in the Mora area. He’s also been a Conservation Officer Academy instructor, field training officer, firearms instructor and use of force instructor. “I really love teaching,” said McGaw, whose area includes 10 counties north of the metro. “I enjoy connecting with the students as well as the older adults who take safety training courses.” Jen Mueller began her career as a conservation officer in the Hutchinson-West station in 2012. Mueller, who was promoted after serving as an acting regional training officer, said she learned quickly that participating in the Enforcement Division’s youth safety programs was one of her favorite parts of the job. “I’m amazed by our volunteer instructor groups and how passionate they are about what they’re teaching,” said Mueller, whose area includes the southwestern part of the state. “I also enjoy teaching our officers and helping them become better equipped to deal with situations they may face in the field.” Brett Oberg has been a conservation officer for 13 years and spent much of that time in the Hutchinson-East station. He’s also been an armorer, field training officer and use of force instructor. “I really enjoy training others and seeing youth get excited about the outdoors, especially firearms and hunting,” said Oberg, whose area includes the south metro and south-central part of the state. “I also enjoy teaching at the Conservation Officer Academy and helping the new recruits become conservation officers.” The four officers join Regional Training Officer Mike Lee, who covers the northeastern part of the state, and Acting Regional Training Officer Greg Oldakowski, who is responsible for the northwestern part of the state. Bruce Lawrence is the Enforcement Division’s statewide recreational vehicle coordinator. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Calves mark successful introduction of Theodore Roosevelt National Park herd genetics With new bison calves expected at Minneopa State Park in the coming weeks and months, managers with the Department of Natural Resources Parks and Trails division are reminding visitors to keep calves’ safety in mind by remaining in their vehicles along the park’s popular bison range road.  “The bison cows are incredibly protective of their calves, and it’s tempting for park visitors to get out of their vehicles to take photos,” said Parks and Trails area supervisor Craig Beckman. “However, it’s important for people to remember to stay in their vehicles for the safety of these calves, their mothers and other park visitors.” The new additions are offspring of the bison bull that was introduced in December 2016. That’s significant, Beckman said, because the bison bull comes from Theodore Roosevelt National Park and possesses a genetic line that’s not well represented in the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd. That genetic line will contribute to the herd’s overall genetic health and diversity. While Minneopa State Park is seeing its first successful additions to the herd, the bison herds at Blue Mounds State Park and the Minnesota Zoo are also seeing new calves this year. For visitors viewing the bison at state parks, patience can be rewarded. “Newborns need time for maternal bonding, and may be hard to see from the road for a while, but as they grow and mature, they become more visible,” Beckman said. “We tell visitors that they will be more likely to see the bison if they are patient and take it slow as they drive through the range.” Bison viewing tips: The bison drive begins near the campground off state Highway 68. A vehicle permit ($7/one-day or $35/year-round) is required to enter the park. Bison may be difficult to spot at times. Drive slowly and keep a watchful eye through the range. Remain inside vehicle while driving through the bison range. Bison should be given clearance of at least 75 feet from people and vehicles at all times. Dogs can make bison nervous, so pets must be kept on a leash while in the park and hiking around the bison range. Bison get nervous around loud noises or lots of activity, so keep voices down and movements to a minimum to help keep the bison within easy viewing. Hiking is not allowed inside the range, but there are hiking trails all the way around the outside of the range that can provide some fantastic views of the bison. The bison are part of the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd, managed through a formal agreement between the DNR and Minnesota Zoo. The partners are working together to preserve American plains bison and plan to grow the herd at several locations, including Blue Mounds and Minneopa state parks and the Minnesota Zoo. The goal is a 500-animal herd at multiple locations. Genetic testing of the herd from 2011 to 2014 found them largely free of any genetic material that would have come from cross-breeding with cattle. Less than 1 percent of all American plains bison tested so far have been found free of cattle genes. Visitors at Minneopa can check the park website for updates on the bison herd and its new calves at mndnr.gov/Minneopa. The site also provides more information about the park, including a virtual tour. Minneopa State Park is located off U.S. Highway 169 and state Highway 68, 5 miles west of Mankato. The bison range road is open Thursday through Tuesday each week from 9am to 3:30pm. For more information about the Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd on the Minnesota Zoo website or visit mndnr.gov/bison. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.