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guts

Kab Old Timers

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guts

Well I hate to admit it, but I remember coming up here as a youngster, in either 1952 or 1953. My folks always stayed on Pine Island resort, you were brought there by boat out of Esslingers or Clines resort.

I'll never forget Clines restaraunt/bar. The mens room had what was an obvivious nude pin-up covered up from the chest down with a piece of plywood on a top hinge.
As most curious young lads would do, I lifted up the plywood to see the best part of the pin-up, I didn't know that when the plywood was raised, it set off a buzzer in the bar, so that everyone in the bar would know you peeked at the pix. As a 10 year old, it was quite embarassing.

On Pine Island, they had an old mare they would use for hauling ice blocks in the winter, we would bareback ride her around the island. Lastly, I use to catch holy hell for going into the ice house and crawling around on the ice blocks, knocking off the sawdust.

Fishing was outstanding back then, I use to lose lots of fish with the old no drag casting reels, and speeding around wasn't a problem with our 7 1/2 hp Champion. Fun back then wasn't it? guts <{{{{><

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Ole1855

Lovewirehairs,

I don't go back quite that far but I've got a good story for you. My Uncle Sidney died when I was 17, he was 75 when he died, that was 37 years ago which would make him 105 today. He owned 500 acres and 1/2 mile of lake shore on Crane lake back in the late 20's into the 30's. About 10 years ago my Aunt who was 25 years younger than my Uncle died, in the process of cleaning her house out, I found several large boxes with pictures and writings from my Uncle all revolving around Crane Lake, Namakan, Kabetogama, Ash River and Rainy Lake. There are picures of northerns that would scare you, many, many well over 20 #'s. One thing that really stood out was a story and picture of a guy that took his boat over Kettle Falls before they had a dam there. After reading that story, my brother and I took our sons on a fishing trip to Kab. on one day we took a ride from our resort to Kettle Falls Hotel. While there I spot this picture on the wall of the guy that took his boat over the falls, crazy!!!! In the story that my Uncle wrote he made a comment to the effect that this guy's wife got really PO'd at him, my Uncles response was, "Cripes a guy can't even go out, have a few drinks and have some fun and the wife get's mad". Some day I would love to sit down and go through those boxes and organize the stories and pictures, I'm sure there is a whole book full of stories that could be written. Well I guess I've gotten long winded enough.

Ole

[This message has been edited by Ole1855 (edited 02-16-2004).]

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lovewirehairs

Just happened on this site by accident, and it brought back some great memories. I've fished on Kab, off and on for 50 years. It used to be the family summer vacation when I was a kid and I did the same with my family years later. When my folks and I first started going up we used to stay at Gumingo's Lost Acres (the name has since changed). Old Red and Thelma were quite a pair! Fishing was always great. I stopped going back about a dozen years ago when I "discovred" the east end of Rainy Lake. My sons and I would camp on Fish Camp Island and for a few years we had the whole east end to ourselves, you hardly saw a boat the whole day. Fishing was absolutely incredible. Then, of course, word got out and the boats were everywhere. It's still a great place though.

Anybody out there go back that far? Any old stories to tell?

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Hockey Guy

I would love to see those pictures!! I have seen some unbelievable pictures from those days. Guys with stringers full of Walleye so huge you would swear they were Northerns! I live in the Twin Cities but have been going to Kab/Nam for 28 years now. I get up there anywhere from 3-8 times per year. I remember the good old days in the late 70's when I guy could catch some 15-20 pound Northerns. I think all the spearing has pretty much ruined that for those of us that like to angle for Northerns. We used to stay at a number of different resorts, but the one I have the fondest memories of is Whispering Pines. Anyone remember that place? It breaks my heart to see it turned into the ranger station or whatever it is now.

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guts

Hockey guy, I stayed there afew different times including their last year. A very nice location for a resort for good Kab and Nam access.
The final year they were open, I was doing a stretch of employment in Ill. before transferring back here and I brought up a 28" Regal, more for pleasure than fishing obvivious. Driving down the road to Wispering Pines and launching the boat down that ramp was a scary feat. They were nice enough to pull the boat out for me with there tractor. My vechile was a I think a 1986 Full size chev wagon. No match for that boat coming up the hill from the ramp.

Believe it or not we did very well fishing from that tub between the Chase Is. on the sand bar. About 4-6' water. A great place it was. guts <]]]]]]]><

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Animal

I'm not an old timer on Kab having only lived in northern MN for 23 years. I started fishing Kab and Namakan in the early 80's and camped with my kids several times each year. I still get there about 15 days a year.

My next door neighbor is now 86 and he and I talk about Kab frequently. He began visiting his uncle’s cabin as a child. That would be in the late 1920's. He tells me stories that it would take most of the day to go from just north of Duluth to Ray. The cabin was located on the east end of the lake and no one was ever concerned about catching fish. He tells me that he and his dad would go fishing in the morning before they left for Duluth to catch some take home fish. They were never disappointed. They would row a boat out to an island which they called the "fish spot".

He's said that he after his teenaged years he would not travel back to Kab until the late 40's because WW II came along, then he got married and went to work. The cabin had also changed hands. He often speaks that in the late 40's he helped build a campground on the far eastern end of the lake. I wonder if this might be Woodenfrog.

He still has some of the old glass rods and the level wind reels that he used back then. He has the 1950s 5HP Johnson Seahorse that he bought new and his old aluminums boat that is made out of at least 1/4 inch aluminum. You couldn’t kick a dent in it. He would lift it on top of he truck by himself. I am sure that this was no small feat. He also made his first pickup camper.

As the years went by he traveled to many different lakes and had many different campers and eventually a big class A RV. Sorry to say he sold it last year when his wife couldn’t get around the campgrounds any longer. I've offered to take him back up several times, but he seems content to have had his day and let me "battle the crowds' as he puts it.


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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • chucker1101
      These aren't campsites to bring your Ranger fiberglass or decked-out Lund into. They're better fitted for smaller 14-16 ft alum boats, something you can drag on shore. Though i'm sure you can figure out how to secure something bigger. Cliff is right, most have sandy/pebble shorelines to pull a smaller boat onto. Almost all of them are well-protected from the prevailing WSW wind. You're gonna get wakes rolling into shore from passing boats, though, as it's a pretty well traveled section of the lake.
    • brrrr
      I camped at a couple sites a few years ago.  no docks, but most of the sites had a half way decent place to put the boat in.  one had a decent log to tie to.  another I threw a couple anchors out back and was able to tie off to a couple trees to keep the boat close yet off the rocks. 
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      I do not think that there are docks at the overnight campsites but some do have sandy shorelines. Most of the shore lunch/picnic  sites do have docks but are not overnight camping sites. Cliff
    • Getanet
      Thanks for the info guys. Looks like I have some research to do. Chucker, do you know if Hinsdale Island has a place to dock a boat ?  I'd hate to have it banging against rocks all night.
    • Rick
      The new northern pike fishing regulations, which were announced recently and go into effect on the May 12 fishing opener, have three distinct zones to address the different characteristics of pike populations in Minnesota, according to the Department of Natural Resources.

      Each of the zones – north-central, northeast and south – provide protection for different sizes of pike, and there are reasons for those differences. “We’re continuing to let anglers know there are new pike regulations for those who want to keep pike on inland waters,” said Chris Kavanaugh, DNR northeast region fisheries manager. “We also want to share the thinking behind the new regulations.” North-central zone
      The north-central zone is the largest of the three zones, and here the possession limit is 10 northern pike, but only two can be longer than 26 inches; and all from 22 to 26 inches must be released. “We’re responding to angler concerns about the over-abundance of small, or hammer-handle, pike in the north-central zone,” Kavanaugh said. Through anglers keeping small fish but protecting the 22 to 26 inch pike, the objective in the north-central zone is to both reduce the abundance of small pike and allow medium size pike to grow larger. The advantages of growing larger pike are twofold. While protected these medium size pike will eat small pike, helping reduce abundance of small pike. And when they eventually grow out of the protected size range they will be a more desirable size for keeping. Southern zone
      In the southern zone, where reproduction is limited, the regulation intends to increase pike abundance while also improving the size of fish harvested. Anglers in the southern zone can keep two fish, but the minimum size is 24 inches. “The management issue in the southern zone is the opposite of what’s happening in the north-central zone,” Kavanaugh said. “With low reproduction, stocking is often necessary to provide a pike fishery in the south. Here we want to protect young pike and give them a chance to grow.” Growth rates are much faster in these southern lakes so most will reach the 24 inch keeper size in a few years. Northeastern zone
      In the northeastern zone, pike reproduction is good but these lakes do not have the high density problems of the north-central zone since they still have a nice balance of medium to large pike. Here, it makes sense to provide protection for large pike while they still exist. “The trophy pike of the Arrowhead Region have definitely made some great stories and photos over the decades,” Kavanaugh said. “But these fish grow slowly in the cold water and if too many anglers keep trophy pike here, they’ll be gone.” In the northeastern zone, anglers can keep two pike but must release all from 30 to 40 inches, with only one over 40 inches allowed in possession. Other considerations
      Anglers who want to keep pike will need to be prepared to measure them. Those planning to take advantage of the expanded bag limit on small pike should familiarize themselves with the extra cuts it takes to fillet the fish. New pike regulations do not affect border water fishing regulations or special regulations that cover individual lakes, rivers and streams. Darkhouse spearing regulations for pike differ slightly and those regulations are listed in the spearing section of the regulations booklet. For more information on the new zone regulations visit mndnr.gov/pike or contact a local area fisheries office. Contact information can be found at mndnr.gov/areas/fisheries or in the printed fishing regulations booklet. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The lingering cold weather is delaying ice-out on Minnesota lakes and rivers, which could make it difficult for DNR crews to have the 1,500 public water accesses it manages ready in time for the May 12 fishing opener. “I want Minnesotans to know that we are doing everything we can to get ready for the fishing opener,” said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr, “but mostly what we need are warmer temperatures and sunshine.” There are approximately 3,000 public water access sites statewide, and the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division manages about half of them. “Winter weather is always a challenge to Minnesota’s public water access sites,” said Nancy Stewart, water recreation program consultant. “Because of the late ice-out this year, DNR crews will have a shorter window than usual to get boat ramps and docks ready for the May 12 fishing opener, but we will have as many of them ready as possible.” Every year, repairs are needed at hundreds of sites, because freezing temperatures and ice cause concrete to crack and buckle on the ramps. In some years, crews can get a head start on that work, even before ice-out, but this year the snow has prevented them from assessing damage, and the ramps can’t be re-leveled until the ground thaws. In the meantime, crews are busy rehabbing docks by, for example, changing bumpers and wheels as needed so that they’ll be ready to pop in when the time comes. “Even if every last dock isn’t in by the opener, there will be places to fish and boat,” said Stewart. Helpful resources on the DNR’s Public Water Access website include: A map showing where ice-out has occurred. Phone numbers for DNR Area Offices for updates. Boaters and anglers can also get their questions answered by calling the DNR Info Center: 888-646-6367 (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday). Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Hunters are reminded that applications for bear hunting licenses are being accepted now through Friday, May 4, wherever Minnesota hunting and fishing license are sold, online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense and by telephone at 888-665-4236. A total of 3,350 licenses are available in 13 permit areas. Bear licenses cost $44 for residents and $230 for nonresidents, and there is a $5 application fee. The season is open from Saturday, Sept. 1, through Sunday, Oct. 14. Notification to lottery winners will be made by Friday, June 1. Lottery winners will receive a postcard in the mail and can check online at mndnr.gov/licenses/lotteries/index.html to see if they were drawn. The deadline to purchase licenses awarded by lottery will be Wednesday, Aug. 1. Any remaining unpurchased licenses will be available over the counter starting at noon on Monday, Aug. 6. An unlimited number of bear licenses will be sold over-the-counter for the no-quota area that includes east-central and far northwestern Minnesota. No-quota licenses are valid only in the no-quota area. Hunters with a no-quota license can harvest one bear. Bear hunting information is available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/hunting/bear. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • chucker1101
      There are 11 sites on/around Hinsdale Island, managed by the State DNR through one of the local parks (used to be Bear Island, it now might be Soudan Mine Park). Here's a link:  http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/destinations/state_parks/lake_vermilion_soudan_underground_mine/Hinsdale_map.pdf I think they're free to use, first come / first serve.  #11 is my favorite. I've heard that the ones on Hinsdale island have occasional visits from bears.
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Check the lakevermilion.com site for a list of public campsites on Lake Vermilion. Cliff
    • gunner55
      We'll be making a trip in to GR again. in the next couple days. See what it looks like then.