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SkunkedAgain

The Timberjay recently had a typical article about the Hatchery in operation in Pike Bay. It reminded me that they did not strip eggs last year due to Covid, and there was some discussion about how this would affect the lake's walleye population. I did a little digging last night into the annual growth of walleye in Vermilion and found that it takes somewhere in the 3-4 year range to reach eater-size range. That means that the "covid experiment" won't be real noticeable until the end of this season when walleye start reaching double-digits in length but most likely 2022 when those walleye are in the 10-14 inch range.

 

From the Lake Vermilion Fisheries Management Plan (https://files.dnr.state.mn.us/publications/fisheries/special_reports/183.pdf

Besides abundance, differences between walleye captured in East and West Vermilion are most evident in age and size structure. Overall, walleye in West Vermilion tend to grow faster and live longer than walleye in the east basin. For example, by age-5, walleye captured in East Vermilion average about 16 inches compared to 18 inches in West Vermilion. Walleye on Lake Vermilion can survive to age-8 or older, however older walleye (age-7+) tend to be more abundant in West Vermilion.

 

I figure that Lake of the Woods is similar in latitude to Vermilion, so probably similar growth rates.

 

From the Lake Of The Woods section of the DNR website: (https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/areas/fisheries/baudette/low_walleye.html#:~:text=Generally%2C walleye in Lake of,male walleye are sexually mature.

Generally, walleye in Lake of the Woods reach 12 inches long when they are three years old. Male walleye start to mature when they are 12 inches long, 3 years old, but it is not until they are 16 inches long, 5 years old, that all male walleye are sexually mature. Male walleye longer than 24 inches are extremely rare.

 

Female walleye grow faster than male walleye, after they are three years old. Female walleye start to mature when they are 4 years old, 15 inches long, but all of them are not sexually mature until they are 7 years old, 20 inches long. Generally, female walleye which are 25 inches long are about 10 years old, and 30 inch females are in the range of 20 years old. The oldest Lake of the Woods walleye we have aged was a 23 year old female which was 30.3 inches long.

Edited by SkunkedAgain
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FishinCT

I assume they also didn’t do the fall electrofishing survey to assess young of the year walleye?

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JerkinLips
On 4/20/2021 at 10:05 AM, SkunkedAgain said:

It reminded me that they did not strip eggs last year due to Covid, and there was some discussion about how this would affect the lake's walleye population.

Since most of the hatchery fry are sent to other lakes, the skipped year shouldn't have too much of an effect on the Vermilion population.  From the numbers I recall, the fry put back into Vermilion from the hatchery is slightly higher than their PREDICTED natural hatch would be (which all stay in Vermilion).  Will be interesting to see what the results of this "experiment" will be.  Maybe they will have to increase the percentage of hatchery fry going back into Vermilion to match the actual natural hatch (which may be better than they estimate).

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SkunkedAgain

True - although the DNR tries to make us all feel better by saying that the number of fry that survive is higher due to their re-introduction back into Vermilion. In theory that means that we will not have as good of a 2020 walleye class, but as we know there are so many other factors that go into it.

 

As you said, it's an experiment - a very uncontrolled experiment

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Raven77

I could not be more pumped about walleye fishing on LV this year.  The DNR reports are off the charts and they match what we experienced last fall.  Can't wait for opener!

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FishinCT

Pretty hard to find anything bad in that report. They did end up doing the fall electrofishing and found a down year class, so it would’ve been nice to have the hatchery supplement the spawn last year. 
 

I did find it interesting that they sampled walleyes from every year class going back to 2006. They even got one that was 23 years old!

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SkunkedAgain

At 23 years old, that walleye was probably wiser than I.

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delcecchi
19 hours ago, SkunkedAgain said:

At 23 years old, that walleye was probably wiser than I.

Even a fish wouldn't get into trouble if they kept their mouth shut..... 

 

I made a plaque with that on it in cub scouts....   several years ago...

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jkrash

 I find a few things interesting in the 2021 survey report, one is the correlation between perch and walleye, it seems the perch numbers are up and the walleye numbers are down in west vermilion and the perch numbers are down and walleye numbers are up in east vermilion. Maybe it's time to adjust the slot limit again so we don't end up with to many big walleye in the lake. I would think a 4 fish limit with a one over 18 regulation might work good and should be considered next year when the current management plan expires.

Another thing I don't agree with is the pike population is down because of Muskie stocking. From my personal observations I believe the pike population is doing quite well but the loss of habitat has had a negative effect on some of my best pike fishing spots. As far as Muskie stocking goes I believe there needs to be a more aggressive stocking program to get our numbers back to the early 2000 levels, we had a number of dry years where the lake did not receive stocking. I also find it interesting that if I go swimming and dive 25' down I will be just as warm (or cold) as going 3' down.

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Raven77

Where are you hearing the walleye numbers are down in west Vermilion?  Here's the quote from the Timberjay article "A catch rate of 16.0 fish/net was the second highest catch rate on record on west Vermilion. The latest results appear to suggest that the low walleye numbers and overabundance of older walleye on the lake’s west end may have turned around as a result of recent strong year classes".

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SkunkedAgain

I thought that it was higher on the west end as well, but didn't re-read the report yet.

 

As for swimming, my only guess is to pay attention to the wind. When there is no wind the temperature differences are noticeable because the warm water rises and the cold water sinks. As the wind and waves pick up, it mixes up the lake and causes the upper and lower waters to mix. On big waters such as Lake Michigan, you'll find that the west winds blow the warm surface waters east towards the western shores of Michigan. This pushes Michigan's shore waters down and then back west towards Wisconsin like a conveyer belt. The few beaches in Milwaukee then have colder water as the bottom of the "conveyor belt" surfaces and then gets pushed west again as it warms. This can happen in bigger bays on Vermilion as well.

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jkrash

click on the lake survey report in my earlier post

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Raven77

I studied the lake survey report that you posted links to - thanks for the links BTW.  Page 2, Figure 2 of the discussion appendix shows walleye gill net catch rates on west Vermilion.  2020 was the second highest walleye catch rate on the west end, second only to 2015.  The 3 year rolling average is up as well.  This survey is positive news for the west end walleye fishery.  

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SkunkedAgain

I just re-read it too. Below is the walleye section below from the link jkrash posted:

 

Walleye
The 2020 annual fall gill-net survey produced the highest lakewide Walleye catch rate in the 37 years of standardized
sampling in Lake Vermilion at 20.4 fish/net (Appendix A; Figure 2). High catch rates were observed throughout the
lake even after substantial fishing pressure had occurred during the spring and summer based on anecdotal
observations. The significant increase in catch rates, relative to the two previous years, was driven by recent strong
recruitment. The Lake Vermilion Walleye abundance objective was met for the first time since 2017 (MNDNR 2018).
The 3-year moving average (2018 to 2020) of 14.7 fish/net exceeded the objective of 14 fish/net set in the
management plan.


The 2020 East Vermilion Walleye catch rate of 23.3 fish/net ranked as the third highest catch rate historically in that
basin (Appendix A; Figure 2). It was a substantial increase from the previous two years, and the 2020 catch rate
brought the 3-year moving average to 16.4 fish/net. This was the first time that the management plan objective of 16
fish/net was met since 2017 (MNDNR 2018). The 2020 West Vermilion catch rate of 16.0 fish/net ranked as the
second highest catch rate historically in that basin (Appendix A; Figure 2). It was a significant increase from the
previous four years and maintained the 3-year moving average (12.2 fish/net) above the management plan objective
(10 fish/net) for the sixth consecutive year.


The mean length of Walleyes captured during the 2020 gill-net survey was 13.9 inches (n = 406), excluding
young-of-the-year fish. This was the smallest average size since 2008 which can be attributed to the recent strong
year classes that produced above average catches of fish under 15 inches. An increasing trend in the mean length of
sampled Walleyes was initially observed following the implementation of protected slot limits beginning in 2006. This
trend has levelled off over the last several years, but larger mean lengths continue to be observed when compared to
the pre-regulation period. The stabilization of mean lengths may be partially attributed to the levelling off of mature
female Walleye abundance that are mostly in the protected slot. Growth differences occur when comparing the
basins, as fish in West Vermilion on average grow faster at younger ages. For example, age-2 fish captured in West
Vermilion in 2020 ranged in length from 10.7 to 15.9 inches (mean = 12.9 inches) compared to a range of 10.0 to 13.1
inches (mean = 11.4 inches) for age-2 fish in East Vermilion.


Due in part to the high catch rates observed in 2020, the number of Walleyes captured in 1-inch length groups were
near or above lakewide historical medians for nearly every category (Appendix A; Figure 3). Notably high numbers of
fish were observed in the 9 to 14-inch length groups. In fact, this was the highest catch rate of fish under 13 inches
ever observed in Lake Vermilion. These fish should provide substantial catch and harvest opportunities over the next
several years. Additionally, high catch rates of fish 20 inches and larger will continue to provide memorable catch
opportunities throughout the lake.


In East Vermilion, catches of fish in the 8 to 16-inch length groups were near or above historical medians (Appendix
A; Figure 3). Fish in the 9 to 11-inch length groups and the 14-inch length group greatly exceeded median catches.
The catch rate of fish under 13 inches was the third highest ever recorded in the basin. Additionally, fish in the
18-inch length group and fish over 20 inches were caught in above average numbers. In particular, the catch rate of
fish 20 inches and larger was the highest ever observed in East Vermilion. These fish should provide notable catch
and harvest opportunities in East Vermilion in 2021 and beyond along with the chance to catch a memorable sized
fish.

 

In West Vermilion, catches of fish in the 11 to 14-inch length groups notably exceeded historical medians (Appendix
A; Figure 3). The catch rate of fish under 13 inches was the third highest observed historically. Combined with the
above average numbers of fish in the 17 and 18-inch length groups, West Vermilion should provide exceptional catch
and harvest opportunities in the near future. Above-average numbers of fish 20 inches and larger will continue to
provide memorable catch opportunities. Low numbers of fish in the 15 and 16-inch length groups may partially be
attributed to angler harvest, as that is within the preferred harvest length for most anglers.


Walleyes captured in gill nets in 2020 ranged in age from 0 to 23 years old (n = 408) based on otolith aging.
Lakewide catch rates of age-0 (2020 year-class), age-1 (2019 year-class), age-2 (2018 year-class), age-4 (2016
year-class), age-5 (2015 year-class), age-7 (2013 year-class), and ages-8 and older fish were at or above historical
medians (Appendix A; Figure 4). The catch rate of age-2 fish was the highest ever observed for an age-2 cohort. This
follows an above-average catch rate of that year-class as an age-1 cohort in 2019, suggesting strong recruitment. For
the third consecutive year, catch rates from the 2017 year-class were below the 25th percentile indicating poor
recruitment from that cohort. The catch rate of fish ages-8 and older exceeded the 75th percentile for the second
consecutive year and for the 10th time in 11 years. Following implementation of size protective walleye regulations in
2006, the catch rate of these older fish has drastically increased.


In East Vermilion, catch rates of age-0, age-1, age-2, age-4, age-5, age-7 and ages-8 and older Walleyes were above
historical medians (Appendix A; Figure 4). The catch rate of age-1 fish was above the historical 75th percentile for
catch rates of age-1 cohorts and the catch rate of age-2 fish was just below the historical 75th percentile of age-2
cohorts indicating recent strong recruitment. Catch rates from the 2017 year-class were below the 25th percentile for
the third consecutive year indicating poor recruitment from that cohort. Catch rates of fish ages-8 and older were the
highest ever observed in East Vermilion continuing an increasing trend.


In West Vermilion, catch rates of age-2, age-4, age-5, and ages-8 and older fish were above historical medians
(Appendix A; Figure 4). The catch rate of age-2 fish was the highest ever observed for any cohort in that basin. This
followed a catch rate above the 75th percentile for the same cohort in 2019, signaling strong recruitment from the
2018 year-class. Age-3 fish were captured below the historical 25th percentile for age-3 cohorts following 2 years with
below median catch rates for the 2017 year-class. Walleyes from this year-class were mostly within the preferred
harvest size range and had not yet reached the protected size suggesting harvest could have reduced numbers. The
catch rate of fish ages-8 and older declined dramatically in West Vermilion compared to 2019. However, the 2020
catch rate still exceeded the historical median. Over the past 11 years, the catch rate of older fish has been above
the 75th percentile eight times. However, recent trends suggest that the number of older fish in the basin are
declining.


A linear mixed model was used to estimate year-class strength based on gill-net catches of age-1 to age-3 Walleyes
(D. Staples, DNR, unpublished data). This model factors in annual variation in catchability thus year-class strength
estimates for individual cohorts change slightly as additional data are input into the model. The annual differences are
mostly negligible, except for more recent cohorts that are still being captured in gill nets. Year-class strength index
values assigned to the first two cohorts (i.e., 1981 and 1982) and the two most recent year-classes sampled are not
complete and have greater uncertainty associated with them because those cohorts were not sampled at age-1,
age-2, and age-3. Generally, the 25th percentile is a threshold below which year-class strength is considered weak.
Recruitment concerns occur when weak year-classes are produced in consecutive years. A strong year-class is
defined by meeting or exceeding the 75th percentile of historic estimates.


Lakewide year-class strength values ranged from 0 to 4.5 from 1983 to 2017 (Appendix A; Figure 5). The Lake
Vermilion management plan Walleye recruitment objective was met in the 2020 survey (MNDNR 2018). The most
recent strong year-class was produced in 2016 and preliminary estimates indicate 2018 and 2019 could also be
strong year-classes. The most recent weak year-class occurred in 2017. Lakewide year-class strength estimates are
heavily influenced by catches in East Vermilion since the basin is larger, receives more gill nets, and has a higher
Walleye abundance.


In East Vermilion, year-class strength estimates ranged from 0 to 3.3 from 1983 to 2017 (Appendix A; Figure 5). The

management plan recruitment objective for that basin was met in 2020 (MNDNR 2018). The most recent strong
year-class was produced in 2016 and preliminary estimates indicate 2019 could be strong. The last weak year-class
was produced in 2017.


In West Vermilion, year-class strength values ranged from 0 to 4.7 from 1983 to 2017 (Appendix A; Figure 5). The
current 3-year moving average met the recruitment objective and estimates over the last 6 years indicate consistent
moderate to strong recruitment following a weak 2013 year-class (MNDNR 2018). It appears that after multiple years
of sampling, the 2018 cohort will be the first strong year-class in West Vermilion since 2014 and a potential banner
year-class overall. However, the majority of those fish will likely be within the preferred harvest size range at some
point during 2021, and angler harvest could be significant enough to reduce gill-net catch rates in the fall which could
be reflected in reduced year-class strength estimates overall.


Year-classes produced annually within each basin have displayed a weak positive correlation. However, during some
years this relationship has become decoupled. For example, in 2014 a weak year-class was produced in East
Vermilion while a strong year-class was produced in West Vermilion. The mechanisms of why this occurs is not fully
understood, but it is assumed that fish can move freely between the basins and compensate as habitat and food
webs allow.


Fall electrofishing provides useful information on abundance and growth of young-of-the-year (YOY) Walleyes near the
end of their first growing season (MNDNR 2017). In Lake Vermilion, both the catch rate of YOY Walleyes and the
mean length of fish captured display a moderately positive correlation with future lakewide year-class strength
estimates for individual cohorts. When comparing individual basins, East Vermilion displays a strong positive
correlation between the mean length of YOY Walleyes and future year-class strength while there is no relationship in
West Vermilion. On the other hand, both basins display a moderately positive relationship with YOY catch rates and
future year-class strength.


In 2020, the lakewide catch rate of YOY Walleyes of 72.0 fish/hour fell below the 25th percentile of previous surveys
(Appendix A; Figure 6). The mean length of fish captured was 6.3 inches (n = 216) which was the highest average
size ever recorded. The catch rate in East Vermilion was 104.5 fish/hour, slightly above the 25th percentile for that
basin (Appendix A; Figure 6). The 6.3 inch (n = 209) average length of YOY Walleyes captured in that basin was the
largest average size ever observed. The catch rate in West Vermilion of 7.0 fish/hour fell below the 25th percentile for
the second consecutive year (Appendix A; Figure 6). The average length of YOY Walleyes captured was 7.1 inches
(n = 7) and the small sample size produced the second highest average size recorded.


Electrofishing catch rates in West Vermilion have been on a declining trend from highs observed in the mid to late
1990s and early 2000s. However, variability in year-class strength appears to be fluctuating normally, moderate to
strong year-classes are still being produced, and gill-net catch rates have been relatively stable. On the other hand,
catch rates in East Vermilion display a slightly increasing trend dating back to 1988, although that trend has leveled
off more recently. Nonetheless, variability in year-class strength appears to be fluctuating normally and weak
year-classes still occur. Based on East Vermilion YOY catch rates and average length of fish observed, preliminary
data suggests the 2020 year-class is likely to be moderate. In West Vermilion, the 2020 year-class is likely to be
moderate to weak which would result in an overall moderate year-class lakewide.


The density of mature female Walleyes, or spawning stock biomass (SSB), is expressed as pounds per surface acre
and is estimated from gill-net catches using a gill-net catchability model (qabg model) (Anderson 1998). Since initial
estimates of SSB were made in 1988, lakewide density has ranged from 0.4 to 2.7 pounds/acre with a steadily
increasing trend (Appendix A; Figure 7). The management plan defined an objective range for SSB from 1.3 to 2.1
pounds/acre (MNDNR 2018).


In 2020, the highest ever lakewide SSB was observed at an estimated 3.0 pounds/acre. This was due in part to the
historically high gill-net catch rates that occurred. The 3-year moving average was above the objective range for the
8th consecutive year. However, the most recent trend indicates SSB is leveling off. In East Vermilion, SSB has
ranged from 0.3 to 2.7 pounds/acre since 1988 (Appendix A; Figure 7). The SSB objective range for East Vermilion
was set from 1.1 to 1.8 pounds/acre (MNDNR 2018). The 2020 estimate of 3.5 pounds/acre was by far the highest

ever observed in that basin, and the 3-year moving average remained above the objective for the 8th consecutive year.
In West Vermilion, SSB has ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 pounds/acre since 1988 (Appendix A; Figure 7). The 2020
estimate of 2.3 pounds/acre was the lowest since 2014 and continues a slightly declining trend over the last 6 years.
The 3-year moving average was within the objective range of 1.6 to 2.5 pounds/acre for the second consecutive year.


Despite being above the lakewide objective range, the current SSB levels do not appear to be negatively impacting
the Walleye population. Our understanding of the dynamics between spawning stock densities, natural reproduction,
and ultimately recruitment is somewhat limited, in part due to Walleye fry stocking activities that occur. In a dynamic
lake ecosystem, it is difficult to define the "optimal" level of SSB because of the complexity of the system. Both
strong and weak year-classes have been produced at both low and high levels of SSB illustrating the complexity of
the issue. The protected slot limit regulations, in effect since 2006 for Lake Vermilion, have played a role in the
increasing density of mature female Walleyes in the lake. The regulation adjustment made in 2017 was primarily
done to increase harvest opportunity with the understanding that SSB would likely be reduced over time. Overall, SSB
estimates may have plateaued or even displayed slight declines, specifically in West Vermilion, following steady
increases initially observed after the size protective Walleye regulations were implemented.

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delcecchi

About water temps... Long ago I read an article in a book, might have been "minnesota fishing" about Vermilion that claimed that there really wasn't a classic thermocline in a lot of the lake due to the many islands and reefs causing mixing as the wind causes currents.      I have no way to know how true this is.   I'm long past diving down 25 feet.

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SkunkedAgain

Good point. I remember Cliff W talking about the lack of a fall turnover due to the lack of a distinct thermocline.

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Fish Head

I sure miss Cliff, Casey, and Mark B on here. 

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delcecchi
5 hours ago, Fish Head said:

I sure miss Cliff, Casey, and Mark B on here. 

Don't we all.... Even if they were east enders

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SkunkedAgain

Ace too. There were a few others I can't remember.

 

I don't know specifically what happened, but I think some people get too into the forums especially on the politics side. Then someone gets their feelings hurt and the swear off a forum and move on. Oh well. I still like the rest of you!

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JerkinLips
16 hours ago, SkunkedAgain said:

I don't know specifically what happened

I believe Cliff retired from guiding, Casey quit guiding, and Mark B left the state.  Maybe forum posters are getting tired of others following them on the lake.

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delcecchi
4 hours ago, JerkinLips said:

I believe Cliff retired from guiding, Casey quit guiding, and Mark B left the state.  Maybe forum posters are getting tired of others following them on the lake.

Didn't Casey have some health issues?   Anyone who wants to follow me around the lake is welcome to...   

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CigarGuy
On 5/8/2021 at 12:36 PM, JerkinLips said:

 Maybe forum posters are getting tired of others following them on the lake.

Hope this wasn't directed at me. I was just joking about following raven around. I go out of my way to stay away from other fisher people! 40,000 acre lake, no need to fish on top of others. 

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gimruis
9 hours ago, CigarGuy said:

40,000 acre lake, no need to fish on top of others. 

 

I've seen over 40 boats parked on a small flat on Mille Lacs before.  You can whisper to the boat fishing next to you as long as you aren't running an old loud 2-stroke motor.  Pool 4 in the spring can also be bumper boats and that's even more interesting because there's current.

 

I'm sure others can comment about how close people come when ice fishing.  The only written law I'm aware of is that you cannot legally fish within 10 feet of another fish house.  If someone is within casting distance of me, that is too close.  That includes recreational boats too.

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Raven77

Bill, you can follow me around for walleyes if I can follow you around for crappies :)

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JerkinLips
On 5/8/2021 at 4:44 PM, delcecchi said:

Didn't Casey have some health issues?

Casey was in a serious car accident several years ago that took him a while to recover from.  Think that may have been why he got out of guiding.

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JerkinLips
On 5/9/2021 at 10:20 PM, CigarGuy said:

Hope this wasn't directed at me. I was just joking about following raven around. I go out of my way to stay away from other fisher people! 40,000 acre lake, no need to fish on top of others. 

Not at all.  I know you were just kidding.  I also stay away from crowds but have had many "close" encounters on the lake.  Many times others swarm all over you if you catch a fish or two.

 

Once somebody immediately went to the spot my daughter caught a 5# walleye in as we drifted 20 feet away.

 

Another time somebody actually bumped my boat as I was very slowly drifting.

 

A third instance somebody snagged my anchor rope and broke their line rather than tell me and ask me to un-snag it (think they know what my answer would have been).

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ozzie

If I snagged an anchor line I am pretty sure i would not ask the anchored angler to lift so I can get my jig back, but I am sure I would warn them that there is a hook now in there anchor line!  I am that way fishing around docks...if I get caught on a dock I will always butt up to it and carefully remove my hook so they do not stick themselves or have a little kid get stuck from it.  Amazingly I have had confrontations with people in this regard!  And it is not like i am pitching bass jigs as I am usually crappie fishing around docks so i am using light line, small hook and cork bobber so I am not hurting a dock if i accidentally cast into it.  Oh well...Good luck to all you Vermillion fisherman on opener and in the rest of the season!

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CigarGuy
On 5/10/2021 at 7:49 AM, gimruis said:

 

I've seen over 40 boats parked on a small flat on Mille Lacs before.  You can whisper to the boat fishing next to you as long as you aren't running an old loud 2-stroke motor.  Pool 4 in the spring can also be bumper boats and that's even more interesting because there's current.

 

I'm sure others can comment about how close people come when ice fishing.  The only written law I'm aware of is that you cannot legally fish within 10 feet of another fish house.  If someone is within casting distance of me, that is too close.  That includes recreational boats too

I've fished the zoo on Mille Lacs way too many times to count. Grew up a block off pool 2 across the river from Ft. Snelling, fished it all the time early spring, not to mention the St. Louis River. I've got a little jaded fishing in crowds, that's why I went this far north and a large lake!

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      Has anyone had any luck on the jefferson chain by cleveland or any of the lakes by Madison lake
    • leech~~
      By leech~~
      Can't seem to ever get a sled ride together anymore on the other side of the wall.
      Any guys with a sled and porty want to get together for a meetup and fish somewhere some weekend for the day or weekend if way up north?
      Crappies-Walleyes both? 
      Mill Lacs, Brainerd area................?   The more the merrier, safety in numbers helps if someone needs a pull or getting out of slush.
      Not a big plan. Meet at a lake. Stare at the lake map, mark a spot or spots on the gps and head out.
      Not really worried about a cookout, but we could just cuts into fishing time.  Bring our own lunch, bait and pop or? 
      Don't want to count out wheelers with portys but hope you can hang if its deep or slushy. 😕
       
      Oh forget the Public service announcement: Portys must be fished at least 6' feet apart or more!. Wearing a mask is a good idea on a cold sled ride. No talking about Trump, Biden or God will also keep us safe from each other! 😆
       
      So again, no big complicated plan. Meet up, check map, go fishing! 👍
       
       

       
    • Duckhunt
      By Duckhunt
      House was new in spring 2018. Spray foamed top to bottom. Extremely Light weight, all aluminum construction 1300-1400 pounds. You can easily pull with atv. with little tongue weight. Foldable and removable bunk, we used a cot for 2nd bed.
      -6 catch covers w/ sleeves
      -Nuway furnace, needs no electricity to operate manually, also hooked up to thermostat
      -12V low amp draw circulating fans -30A 115v to 12VDC power converter/battery charger with gen/power hookup
      -battery box with 12VDC-115v inverter, and battery meter (newer 31 battery negotiable)
      - LED hole light and beverage holder above every hole
      -LED interior and porch lights
      -Tv/dvd combo on swing wall mount
      -Pioneer stereo with 4 speakers -Loose spare tire (white steel rim)
      -Window Air Conditioner
      This house can go all weekend on a single battery without a generator. No exterior damage anywhere, tires great. Looking to possibly upgrade. Located 20 miles north of Rapids. Thanks!
       






  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • smurfy
      Itasca county sunfish for supper.
    • Wanderer
      It’s a pretty good bass. 👍
    • Kettle
      Welcome Neiljack!
    • Neiljack
      I think 3500 lbs is too much.  Trailer your boat and head to a large open parking lot to practice accelerating, coming to a complete stop, making turns, and backing up. So if you are perfect in it then you should trailer it yourself otherwise there are some hauling company for boat. The more you practice handling your vehicle with your boat in tow, the more comfortable you will feel on the open road.
    • Neiljack
      Hello guys, sorry if i place my intro at wrong place because navigation was tough for me.
    • EyeWannabee
      Short arms make em look like 4# instead of 2 and 3# 😂
    • LakeofthewoodsMN
      On the south end...  Some good walleye fishing this week.  As many summer weeks, it was helpful to be versatile.  On the big lake, sometimes you have to play the wind, meaning, you have to be flexible where you fish.   The fish were there and some great catches this week.  Most fishing in 25-33 feet.  Some are still jigging.  Frozen shiners and leeches were both good this week.  With water temps in the mid to upper 60's, leeches and crawlers will heat up.   Spinners (otherwise called harnesses) with minnows, leeches or crawlers were all effective this week.  It is good to mix up colors and bait until you find the right mix.  Gold, glow, pink, orange, chartreuse or a combo of them are good colors in stained water.  More and more anglers trolling crankbaits with success.  Some have been trolling cranks since the opener but it seems most anglers wait till the water warms.  A great method to cover water and find cooperative fish.   On the Rainy River...   Some good summer fishing reports from the river.  Walleyes being caught jigging, pulling spinners and trolling crankbaits.  Current breaks and holes holding most fish.   Smallmouth bass in rocky areas, current breaks, bridge embankments and weed edges.  Lots of bass in the river.  Crankbaits, spinnerbaits and tube jigs are good lures to start with.   Pike are adjacent to weedlines, in slack water areas and in bays.  Working shorelines whether trolling or casting will normally produce nice fish. Sturgeon anglers, mark your calendars, sturgeon season opens again July 1st.   Up at the NW Angle...  Walleye fishing continues to be strong up at the Angle.  Fish coming from literally 5-33' of water.  Not every walleye is keying on the same food sources.  With structure, rocks, and mud, lots of variety at the Angle.  Jigging, spinners and cranks all producing.  Muskie season opens Saturday, June 19th.  Lots of nice fish already caught unintentionally as these predators like to eat.  Muskie anglers were forced to fish MN waters last year with the border closure were happily surprised with the size and quantity of fish on the MN side.  This year should be good. Pike hanging out in weedy bays.  Smallmouth relating to rocky points and reefs. With the Canada border still closed, there are many ways to get up to the Angle.   1.  The LOW Passenger Service, charter boat shuttle service from the south end, is open and running.  2.  If you have the right boat and expertise, boating across is an option.  3.  And finally, Lake Country Air flying service, a float plane service out of Baudette and other locations.      
    • PSU
      Does anyone have someone to recommend for mowing paths/lawn on an island (Frazer\Smarts Bay)?   I only have a DR Brush Mower system I am using right now (been through 2 old hand me down mowers (I'd love to get rid off, one is a John Deere).   Thanks for any insight   Andy 
    • Jaroberts28
      I wonder why the DNR still list Atlantic salmon??
    • SkunkedAgain
      Wow - that bass in the top pick is almost as big as you   😏
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