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Rick

OutdoorMN News - DNR reminds trappers, waterfowl hunters to avoid spreading invasive species

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Rick

With hunting season underway, the Department of Natural Resources reminds waterfowl hunters to take precaution against spreading aquatic invasive species. 

Without the proper precautions, invasive species such as purple loosestrife, zebra mussels, Eurasian watermilfoil and faucet snails can be transported in boats, decoys or blind material.

Invasive species can damage habitat for waterfowl, fish and other wildlife, and can even cause waterfowl die-offs. For example, faucet snails can carry parasites that can kill thousands of ducks.

“After hunting, take a few minutes to clean plants and mud and drain water from duck boats, decoys, decoy lines, waders and push poles,” said Eric Katzenmeyer, DNR invasive species specialist. “It’s the key to avoiding the spread of aquatic invasive species in waterfowl habitat.”

The DNR has the following recommendations to help slow the spread of aquatic invasive species:

  • Use elliptical or bulb-shaped or strap decoy anchors.
  • Drain water and remove all plants and animals from boats and equipment.
  • Remove all plants and animals from anchor lines and blind materials.
  • Check compartments or storage in boats or kayaks that aren’t used in rest of the year.

Waterfowl hunters should also remember that they must cut cattails or other plants above the water line when using them as camouflage for boats or blinds, if they want to move them from lake to lake.

The DNR is also reminding trappers to clean equipment before moving to another body of water.

“Trappers of muskrats and other furbearers should also keep the ‘Clean in-Clean out’ mantra in mind,” said DNR invasive species specialist Tim Plude. “All traps, lines, boots and waders should be cleaned.”

To kill or remove invasive species seeds or young zebra mussels that are difficult to see, the DNR recommends that boaters use a high-pressure spray or a hot water rinse before launching into another water body (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds). Air drying can also be effective but may require more time due to cooler weather.

A short video shows what waterfowl hunters can do to help stop the spread of invasive species. More information is available on the aquatic invasive species page.

Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

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DJ_Slick

On Sunday morning as I drove home from church, I followed a duck hunter that had obviously just removed their boat from a lake.  The amount of weeds hanging from the axle of the trailer (and subsequently being dropped along the road) was incredible.  I live in an area full of lakes and creeks.  This whole "remove all weeds" thing should be very well known at this point.  I know it was raining, but there was clearly no attempt to remove the weeds before leaving the landing.  It makes me sad that some hunters are that inconsiderate of our resources.

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • CigarGuy
      Does scented make a difference? How about some different ones for walleyes?
    • Bryan P
      @popriveter  Thanks man,  Glad I could get you pumped for the season. It was exciting to get out that early this year. Really sucks this warm weather came in and going set us back though. We were on track for a really nice ice season too. I was out in the Metro on 4-5" for few days last week before it got warm. Ice is still there just looks nasty now. Really bummed. You may have to drive north for some decent ice. Either way fingers crossed for cold snap soon. Be safe and goodluck this season! 
    • Bryan P
      @Bucketcastle lol...Thanks Man. There was a lot of ice checking before this video was made too. Pretty much 4-5" everywhere I drilled. 
    • eyeguy 54
      Some plastics will last thru many crappies. Some maybe one. 😁 Slug bugs. Mayflies. Wishbones. Wedgees
    • CigarGuy
      Please show some pics of good crappie plastics. Good thing is one scoop of minnows will stay alive forever in the winter.
    • Tom Sawyer
      Tremendous buck @MJ1657
    • eyeguy 54
      Yep. Leave the bait home and jiggle jiggle jiggle. 🐟🐟🐟
    • Kettle
      Looks to be super unpredictable still, I heard a few brave souls walking out of Warrod but Arnesens just posted online that they had ice but now gone with the wind. I would imagine it's a few weeks out as it's a huge body of water
    • Rick
      Anyone out ice fishing the bays?
    • Rick
      I built confidence in plastics by going without bait. Amazing what you learn to do when plastics and artificials are your only options.