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Rick

OutdoorMN News - Flowering rush confirmed in Grants Lake in Douglas County

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Rick

First time invasive aquatic plant has been confirmed in county

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed small patches of flowering rush, an invasive aquatic plant, in Grants Lake in Douglas County. 

The DNR has begun removing the plants by hand. Hand removal can be successful in small populations like this one.  DNR staff will monitor the site for any regrowth and take appropriate further control measures if required.

Flowering rush is a weed-like plant with pink flowers that can overtake habitat, crowd out native species and make it difficult for boats to access open water. It is a perennial that grows one to four feet high along shores in shallow, slow-moving water.

In deeper water, it can grow in a submerged form that does not produce flowers. It flowers in early summer through mid-fall. Flowering rush can be difficult to identify when not in flower, as it closely resembles many beneficial native shoreland plants such as the common bulrush.

People can spread flowering rush primarily by moving water-related equipment and illegally releasing water garden plants into public waters. It reproduces by vegetative spread of small onion-like buds called bulbils, which can be hidden in mud and debris and can stick to boots, waders and other fishing and hunting gear.

Flowering rush is a prohibited invasive species in Minnesota, which means it is unlawful (a misdemeanor) to possess, import, purchase, transport or introduce this species except under a permit for disposal, control, research or education.

Whether or not a lake is listed for any invasive species, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:

  • Clean watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.
  • Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.
  • Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.

Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:

  • Spray with high-pressure water.
  • Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).
  • Dry for at least five days.

People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found flowering rush or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.

More information is available at mndnr.gov/ais.

Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • PRO-V
      That's a better picture.
    • AlwaysFishing23
      Casting type spoons like krocodiles, little cleos and pixie spoons are best. Color wise orange/ hammered is by far best but blue can sometimes be decent. 
    • bbfenatic
      First hand yes, got real good then we had high winds with a bit of snow that set things back a little....but still better than 2 weeks ago
    • tacklejunkie
      What kind of baits do people use fishing off the break wall?
    • Wanderer
      @BobT Did you intend to repost that in this thread?  I remember the first time you posted it. Seems odd it pops up here. 🤔
    • Chill62
    • otterman91105
      Just wondering if lake travel has got any better in the last couple weeks with the cold weather does anyone know
    • HossFisher
      That's a nice smallmouth and one to be proud of, but from what I can tell it wouldn't be any more than 20"-21" and 4-5lbs.  I mean no disrespect, just my opinion.  Nice catch!
    • BobT
      If the access is a privately owned road the county would have to either negotiate an agreement for public use, buy the road if the owner is willing to sell, or exercise eminent domain and take it through court order with court ordered compensation.  
    • BobT
      Not to hijack this thread but is this better? If you look you can see that his arms are not fully extended but his elbows are actually close to his ribs. Last year on July 5, my brother-in-law caught this on Lake Osakis while we were working jigs and minnows for walleyes with my nephew. We are not bass fishermen but catch a few nice smallies occasionally when chasing walleyes. We didn't measure or weigh it but we both agreed it was probably close to 25" and he thought it weighed close to 9 lbs. Afterward, when his son kept needling us for releasing it, we looked up what a 25" smallmouth might weigh. What we found was 8 lbs - 4 oz. give or take. Then looked up the state record and learned it was entirely possible that he may have released a new state record. As far as he is concerned it was.  
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