• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
      You know what we all love...

      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
Rick

OutdoorMN News - DNR seeking input on Leech Lake proposed walleye regulation change

Recommended Posts

Rick

A proposed walleye regulation change on Leech Lake would allow anglers more opportunities to keep walleye beginning when the 2019 open water fishing season opens.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is seeking input on the change at an open house from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Monday, Sept. 24, at the Walker Area Community Center.

The proposed regulation change would remove the 20- to 26-inch protected slot and replace it with a regulation similar to the statewide regulation, but with a four-fish walleye limit, only one of which can be over 20 inches.

The current walleye regulation on Leech Lake is four fish, requiring the immediate release of any walleye that are within a 20- to 26-inch protected slot limit. Only one fish over 26 inches allowed in possession. The four-fish walleye possession limit on Leech Lake has been in effect since 2005.

“The regulation was initially put in place to help protect spawning fish,” said Doug Schultz, DNR Walker area fisheries supervisor. “Regulation goals have been exceeded, prompting the DNR to propose increased harvest opportunity at this time.”

Carl Pedersen, the DNR large lake specialist on Leech Lake, said the walleye population is in excellent condition at this time and can afford some additional harvest.

“We have an abundant population of spawning-age fish with a wide distribution of sizes, and multiple year classes of smaller fish entering the fishery,” Pedersen said. “Protective fishing regulations combined with very consistent production of year classes over the past 10 years have put us in a very good position.”

If future fisheries assessments indicate harvest should be reduced, the DNR anticipates revisiting the protected slot limit at that time.

At the meeting, there will not be a formal presentation but DNR staff will be on hand to answer questions and discuss the proposed regulation with individuals who attend. Following the meeting, comments will be accepted through Friday, Oct. 5. Those unable to attend the meeting can provide comments by calling the Walker area fisheries office at 218-547-1683 or by emailing [email protected].

Anglers who can’t make the meeting in Walker can attend an open house about that and other regulation proposals from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at the DNR headquarters in St. Paul, 500 Lafayette Road. No formal presentations will be made at the open house.

More information on fishing regulations can be found on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/fishing.

Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

  • Thumbs Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hoey
1 hour ago, Rick said:

The proposed regulation change would remove the 20- to 26-inch protected slot and replace it with a regulation similar to the statewide regulation, but with a four-fish walleye limit, only one of which can be over 20 inches.

The current walleye regulation on Leech Lake is four fish, requiring the immediate release of any walleye that are within a 20- to 26-inch protected slot limit. Only one fish over 26 inches allowed in possession. The four-fish walleye possession limit on Leech Lake has been in effect since 2005.

“The regulation was initially put in place to help protect spawning fish,” said Doug Schultz, DNR Walker area fisheries supervisor. “Regulation goals have been exceeded, prompting the DNR to propose increased harvest opportunity at this time.”

Carl Pedersen, the DNR large lake specialist on Leech Lake, said the walleye population is in excellent condition at this time and can afford some additional harvest.

 

I really like this approach as it solves three problems with the protected slot:  1)  The out of balance (natural) bio-mass of the slot out consumes the forage that is not available for the newer class years, 2)  The large slot fish consume the smaller ones, and 3)  The males spend most of their life in the keep-able size, thus resulting in over harvest, and lack of support during the spawn.  Allowing one over is a great idea as long as it does not get abused.  Nicely DNR.  Rick - thank you for sharing!!!

 

  • Thumbs Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
walros

Any thoughts about stocking perch of other forage base in this water to keep the walleye from canabalizing the younger year classes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • seifjr
      As usual Curt, thanks for all the reports you provide to us folks that only get up to LOW 4-5 times/year.  Coming up again for the MEA weekend, fishing Thursday-Saturday.  Looks like Thursday's going to be nice with warmer temps and WSW winds.  If we get the heavy WNW winds on Saturday, is the LP area fishable.  Seems like the more west it is the comfort level goes up dramatically.  Bringing the kids this trip, so there not real big fans of the 4-5 footers if you know what I mean.  Hope to see ya Thursday, we'll be in a 2150 Lund and 18.5 Alumacraft. 
    • monstermoose78
      These fish came of the feeding flat.
    • monstermoose78
      I like finding aggressive crappies and those feeding flats normally have more aggressive crappies plus some big gills mixed in. 
    • Rick
      This is great advice as well @monstermoose78. I will add that another reason crappies suspend over a deep basin is because of the plankton rising and dropping from and back to the mud basin below based on light levels.
    • PRO-V
      Got back yesterday from a week at my shack. Tough conditions. Lots of rain and over 6" of snow. My buddy and I saw 28 grouse and got 15. They were pretty wild and had to put the chase on alot of them. Got pretty wet running after them and snow falling on your head. Had to chainsaw our way out to the trucks thanks to the heavy wet snow.
    • Wanderer
      There are lots of options and they all work better for some than others for each individual situation.     I use a mix of single rod cases (hard tube with reel bag on the end), the Bunk box Rick has (works for my laker rods), and break down fly rod case that I custom cut the foam on to fit my in-lines.   Basically, make sure your rods aren’t too long for your house!  From there you could even build an insert into your tub and line it with foam.  Custom cut the interior to fit your rods your way.  Ever go the the Thorne Brothers potable mods gathering.  You could get some ideas there for sure!
    • Wanderer
      I’m in for 2nd season also.  Looking forward to sharing a good hunt with both new and old friends.
    • Parmer
      Best offer 
    • chaffmj
      I am hoping to get the boat out on the lake this Thursday. Looks like it is going to be in the upper 50's!
    • IceHawk
      I use breakdown shotgun cases each one will  fit 2-3 rod reel combos easily. Fit very nicely in my fish trap pros and otters protect very well.  I have 4 of them lable each one  with the species setup in each case stack them on garage bench. Grab the right combos for species being sought after. Only draw back is I have to break handles down on reels. You could probably cut some foam out to make it work easier I have just got use to looseing handles on reels.. My free fall and trip wire work in them also so yes inline setups will work.