• RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Fully Kraeusened

Down riggers in Voyageurs

Recommended Posts

Fully Kraeusened

Hey guys. I’m new to this site. I’ll be visiting the park early June. While I have made several trips up there I’ll be bringing a friend who never has. He is a very experienced angler, but has yet to catch a walleye. A lot of his experience comes from using down riggers on Lake Michigan. He was asking about using them on a vacation this year and I had no answer for him. I can’t recall ever seeing anyone using that method in Voyageurs. Does anyone have a thought on this? I’d appreciate any advice. Want my buddy to have a great trip! 

Tight lines!

Fully Kraeusened

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

I've tried them up there for the heck of it and caught walleye. You can catch large suspended pike that are hanging with the tulibee over deep water also. Wouldn't be my main method though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Hey  Pro-V. Thanks for responding. My first thought was no way, but I’m trying to be more open minded. I feel sometimes I get locked in on certain methods or locations and a lack of flexibility costs me fish. Maybe we will give it a whirl for a bit if the usual methods are slow. June seems like a lifetime away, but I’ll report back if we do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

10-4. They are tricky to use if the depth varies alot. But I kicked myself one time for not bringing them when the fish hung out suspended like I mentioned and the shore and reef bite was tough.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sushilicious

I personally have never down rigged in voyaguers. From time 2 time I've seen ppl down rigging on namakan n sand point but I don't notice them having success/catching fish. With that said my family only jigs, bobbers, n casts with a split shot plain hook/float jig. If u do bring up down gear it may not be a bad idea laker fishing in david if u have a spare day.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Hi Sushilicious. Pardon my ignorance, but I don’t know what you mean by “David”. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sushilicious

It' all good. David lake is in Canada east of sand point. It's a lake trout lake. 

Screenshot_20180305-231251.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Thank you sir. The farthest east I’ve ever been is just north of the Namakan Narrows. How is it getting back there? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sushilicious

Sounds like u have only put in at Kab. The drive from Kab 2 sand point logde isn't an issue. Sand point lodge is the only place that sells license and has live bait on sand, sand point lodge is in canada. The drive from sand point lodge 2 David has a channel with some random rocks and I would recommend taking it slow

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

That’s sounds like a fun day. May look into that. I usually stay on the Ash River. Spend most of my time on Namakan. Does Sand Point see a lot of pressure?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barbelboy

In early June there is absolutely no need for downriggers. the only time I ever used them was to target lake trout in the adjacent waters to Voyaguer. We had a cabin in Grassy Bay for 27 years until the park took it. I'd suggest the following.

Remember, David lake is in Canada, you will need to have all of your documentation in order and visit customs prior to entry. If you choose to do that, stopping at Sand Point lodge on the way in might be a good place to get bait and some current info.

day time - Walleyes - look for points, saddles, humps in between islands. A jig and minnow was usually what we went with. Also trolling crank baits along rocky shores works as well.

Pike- cast mepps spinners or rattle traps to weeds or rocky islands. You'll know how to find weed beds on shore by looking at the trees. If there are big aspens down by the shore, almost inevitably there will be a weed bed. It may not be big, but it will hold fish. Conversely by casting those same lures you will catch small mouth.

Bass- the last hour or so before dark. find 3-4 nice rock piles (the one's with buoys are usually awesome) and cast floating rapalas. (let em sit and twitch them back.) trust me, you will enjoy this experience.

also casting mepps, rapalas, jig/twister or rattle traps to rocky shores, island, rock piles will produce bass and the occasional walleye.

Night (if you have the energy) find a rocky point, break and sit with lighted slip bobbers to catch walleyes.

good luck.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert

If your trip to VNP is in early June and your staying in the Ash River  I personally would try just hook and line methods , either jig minnow or jig leech combinations , or lindy rigs with the same baits. I would stick to either Kabetogama or Namakin lakes in search of Walleye at this time of year , from ultra shallow to maybe 20 feet or so . At these depths and with structure variations , and the proximity to more of a shoreline bite at the dates you will be vacationing there , it could be a very tough way to try down rigging ,vs a more mid summer , July-August scenario of were the Walleye typically tend to be found on more mid lake reefs and flats , then I would think that the down rigging scenario would possibly be a better time of the season to take that type of approach if you so choose...   You didn't say what size boat and motor you will be using ,  but the earlier mentioned David lake that's accessible through Sandpoint lake into Canadian waters is a long haul by water to make with a smaller set up . I would say though , if you choose to make that journey from Ash River to David Lake , it surely would be a beautiful and scenic boat ride ... whatever you choose to do I hope the weather holds for you and you enjoy your stay up there as VNP is a great place to be ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Wow!!! Unbelievable amount of information. Wish I could buy you guys a beer! I was only curious about the down rigging because my friend who is coming for the first time is very experienced in it. I have been to Voyageurs several times and feel pretty confident with the methods you suggested. My biggest problem always is, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone, is catching walleyes small enough to keep. We have hired guide Wade Watson(Kab Kid)the first day of our trip. That should set us up for a solid week. I really appreciate everyone’s feedback. The boat I’ll be bringing is actually more of a pleasure craft. 20’ bow rider with a 350 in it. So in order to even try to down rig we would also have to drag something to slow us down. It idles at about 4-5 mph. Based on these responses doesn’t sound like we should go through all the trouble. I’ve usually rented a boat but I’ve finally mounted a trolling motor on mine so I’ll be bringing it with me for the first time. On the plus side I’ll be able to cover a ton of water now and think I might check out Sand Point and Crane. Here’s some pics of how I convert my pleasure boat to a fishing boat. Please don’t laugh. Lol

1DE9D052-B0CC-4BF3-BAC6-E5CC54492196.jpeg

B278FCD4-6B45-410E-96B3-53044FF09852.jpeg

918261E9-35B0-4D17-8872-A841DDD87D22.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

It's so pretty it would be a shame to get fish blood on it!!:D

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Glad I found this forum!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
leech~~
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Fully Kraeusened said:

 

 

 

918261E9-35B0-4D17-8872-A841DDD87D22.jpeg

Wow, how did you get the wife to OK putting that on the Ski boat? :D

On a side note. How do you have that front seat support base bolted down? If it's just sitting there that could be a bad deal if it tips over in rough water or a buddy hitting the gas to hard! :(

Edited by leech~~
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Shhhh don’t tell her. :DJust kidding. Best part is I can change it back in about 10 minutes. I remove the cushions and set it down in there. It fits in pretty snug. Between that and how much it weighs it doesn’t move(battery is up there to). I’ve already had it out on 3-4 footers. All good! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
leech~~
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Fully Kraeusened said:

Shhhh don’t tell her. :DJust kidding. Best part is I can change it back in about 10 minutes. I remove the cushions and set it down in there. It fits in pretty snug. Between that and how much it weighs it doesn’t move(battery is up there to). I’ve already had it out on 3-4 footers. All good!

Please make sure no one rides there when your under way. Some girl died a year or so back when the front seat ripped loose and she hit her head or something. :(

I would even keep an eye on that battery flying up in heavy waves.  Sorry for being a Buzz kill. ;)

Op, one more. Where did you put your Bow Light with the trolling motor there. No evening or night fishing planed? :confused:

Edited by leech~~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

Trolling motor was relocated just a bit since that pic. Bow light is present. Seat is bolted to 3/4” plywood with six 3/8” bolts. It’s not going anywhere. That being said I wouldn’t let anyone sit up there while traveling. I think it might even be illegal where I live. Battery is also secured down. It’s pretty neat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert

I Agree with others that your plywood sub floor holding your seat pedestal would best be anchored somehow , and not just fitted into the tight fitting area and being somewhat weighted down by your battery on that plywood... I do think that most sensible people would not ever think of riding in this seat while the boat is attempting to plane out , or in a cruising manner . .. you also stated that the battery is secure and you have been in 3-4 footers . There is a big difference between non propelling, or idling, or trolling/drifting in 3-4 footers , vs cruising down lake at 20-30 or more mph and slamming into some good rollers , I too would  be afraid of throwing that battery loose up there by some heavy jarring...  And yup bow lights are definitely part of legally boating at twilight in Mn . , for your own safety , and for the safety of all others out on the lake when you are ... I personally spend a lot of time up VNP way and do agree that hiring the Kab kid is a smart move on that lake for your guiding , he will definitely get you on fish that day , but remember if you catch fish all day long with your guide , at a certain spot , and the very next day the wind comes up from a different direction , be prepared for a plan B attack on those Walleye that day , as the fish I'm sure won't be stacked in that same spot again that day with that wind change . I mean don't think your good to go for that week  by hiring that guide for the one day . That's it , I'm done , good luck up there.

7 hours ago, Fully Kraeusened said:

Glad I found this forum!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened

I really appreciate your guys concern but I promise, you and everyone else on the lake will be safe. I’ve owned a boat for 21 years and been on the water all my life. That set up isn’t going anywhere. I don’t think a sensible person would ride on an elevated bow mounted pedestal seat on any boat while cruising.  The picture I posted was not the finished project. I never said I was idling, trolling or drifting in 3-4 footers. That was at a cruising speed.  I also don’t anticipate spending the whole week at one spot. I’ve fished with Wade one time before and it was a great time. He really takes the time to teach you. Which is what I’m hoping to use the rest of the week. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fully Kraeusened
11 hours ago, Barbelboy said:

In early June there is absolutely no need for downriggers. the only time I ever used them was to target lake trout in the adjacent waters to Voyaguer. We had a cabin in Grassy Bay for 27 years until the park took it. I'd suggest the following.

Remember, David lake is in Canada, you will need to have all of your documentation in order and visit customs prior to entry. If you choose to do that, stopping at Sand Point lodge on the way in might be a good place to get bait and some current info.

day time - Walleyes - look for points, saddles, humps in between islands. A jig and minnow was usually what we went with. Also trolling crank baits along rocky shores works as well.

Pike- cast mepps spinners or rattle traps to weeds or rocky islands. You'll know how to find weed beds on shore by looking at the trees. If there are big aspens down by the shore, almost inevitably there will be a weed bed. It may not be big, but it will hold fish. Conversely by casting those same lures you will catch small mouth.

Bass- the last hour or so before dark. find 3-4 nice rock piles (the one's with buoys are usually awesome) and cast floating rapalas. (let em sit and twitch them back.) trust me, you will enjoy this experience.

also casting mepps, rapalas, jig/twister or rattle traps to rocky shores, island, rock piles will produce bass and the occasional walleye.

Night (if you have the energy) find a rocky point, break and sit with lighted slip bobbers to catch walleyes.

good luck.

That’s great information Barbelboy. One thing that really caught my attention that I’ve never heard before, how do the aspen trees relate to weed beds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cpt Beefcheeks

I was actually thinking about riding in that seat the whole time. Best get me a seatbelt, Mr. Kraeusened. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Capt. Quicksteel

Those aspen trees indicate that there is some earth rather than just rock going down into the water. It's a good clue to finding out of the way weed beds!  (Barbelboy is my son!)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barbelboy

+1 on what Quicksteel said.

Aspen trees instead of pine trees mean soft soil. Which obviously weeds need to grow instead of rocks! Usually located in little (tiny bays) or even indents along main lake shore lines which can mean just a small pocket of weeds. And sometimes those little untouched spots can be gems. You might only get a fish or two off of it, but add it up to 10-12 little spots and you start to have a pretty good day.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now




  • Similar Content

    • Fully Kraeusened
      By Fully Kraeusened
      Wondering if any of you ever fish the inland lakes throughout Voyageurs and if so which ones? I have fished the Locator chain, Ek and Net lakes. My favorite of those three is definitely Locator. Seems to have a lot of northern and I also caught a good sized largemouth. Had a rough day on Ek. Was fishing with light tackle because I’ve been told it’s a good crappie lake and was broken off once otherwise nothing. One small pike on Net. This is a picture of the bass from Locator. 

    • Dock Boy
      By Dock Boy
         Voyageur Park Lodge on Lake Kabetogama recently purchased brand new Ice Trek brand fish houses to rent on Lake Kabetogama.  The houses themselves are all aluminum with spray foam insulation, clean, warm and comfortable!  If your looking for something different from the usual LOW, Red experience check us out.  These are day use houses only and we will offer lodging at Voyageur Park Lodge.  We will only have one lodging unit open in the winter, so fishing parties will be the only guests at the resort, so lots of privacy and no other parties around.  Fish houses will be private out on the ice also! 
      We are excited to be the only angling houses on Lake Kabetogama!  If your looking for  something different let us know!
      Voyageur Park Lodge (Reef Runner Ice houses)
    • Kab Kid
      By Kab Kid
      Good opening weekend...great weather for opener and more boats than normal I would say.  Fishing was good, not great.  I'm sure others have differing opinions, but for us we found larger walleyes in 6-12 feet when pitching jigs.  You had to put up with the large number of small northern that must have been hungry!  Most of our walleyes came by way of a jig and minnow, in 30-35 ft of water...most of these 9-13" and went back, but every 4-5 fish was keepable and a fair number of sauger's were in the mix.  Problem was you could catch 3-5 fish in a spot and then you needed to move.  So, lots of boats running all day Saturday.  Saturday night/evening the bite improved and keeper fish were coming from 22-28' of water, again with a jig and minnow for us.  Sunday sunny and beautiful day to be on the water!  Similar patterns with the evening bite producing most of our keepers that day.
       
      As far as scenery, you simply can't beat this area.  Kabetogama, Namakan, Ash River, and Crane lake is truly beautiful and the fishing is just bonus.  Listening to other fisherman, it seems the slot is frustrating some people...again lots of small fish (future fish) and many 20-22" walleyes but not many trophy's and eaters were tough to find.  All and all, great opener again on Kabetogama, hope everyone else had fun and a safe opening weekend.  Happy to talk fishing on Kabetogama, enjoy the season...
       
      Kab Kid
      http://www.kabkid.com
       
    • Slopfishin
      By Slopfishin
      I realize that walleye is kind up there, but was hoping there were some smallie fishermen here on the board that could give me some advice on the fall smallmouth fishing on Namakan, Sand Point and Crane.  I've been coming up there for many years to fish for smallies in the springtime but have never tried it there in the Fall.  Was thinking that I may try my hand at some fall smallmouth up there while they're trying to fatten up for the winter. 
      Right now I am planning on coming up at the end of September.  I'm hoping to find the fish in less than 20 feet of water.  Jigs, tubes, jerkbaits and topwater is what I'm hoping they will be biting on.  I know water temperature plays a huge role in the fish moving back shallow to feed so I'm hoping my timing is right.  Do you folks think it's worth the trouble around that time.  I really don't feel like hauling my boat 1,100 miles (I live in Kentucky) if I'm gonna be fishing the dead sea.  Would Rainy Lake be a better choice?
      Any advice would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks.
    • Nipper7272
      By Nipper7272
      Hello staying on Namakan later this week for first time with my wife a two boys. Any fishing tips would be helpful.
      Thanks
    • Kab Kid
      By Kab Kid
      Hello Fishing MN Family,
        As a resident of White Bear Lake, and fishing guide on Kabetogama I'm attempting to reach out and ask for a little help to raise awareness and some donations or prizes for White Bear Lake high school fishing club.  I understand it is in a "club phase" currently and hoping to get recognized as a team sport in the next few years.  They are hosting a banquet to raise money and prizes on May 1st, and reached out to some fishing people...I'm turning around and asking if anyone has tackle still in the package, access to hats, bags, or boxes in like new condition that they would be willing do donate.  We are looking for donations for these kids as prizes that they will earn through challenges and fishing activities this year.  If you can help I can get you a tax ID number for your donation.  Please let me know or I can give you information to contact the coach of this fishing club.  I'm a huge fan of getting this next generation on the water!
      My email: kabfishing@yahoo.com
      www.kabkid.com
    • fishin
      By fishin
      Wind set the pace for anglers this past week. Some thought it was too much of a good thing.
      Windblown shorelines were good to anglers that could manage boat control and stay in the 10-15’ depth. Baitfish get directed into those shorelines which usually leads to good fishing.
      If the wind dies down at anytime, or the following day, concentrate your efforts accordingly for great results.
      A suggested method of fishing while the winds are blowing, is troll artificial lures at depths between 12-16’, or use lead line and troll deeper waters. All fish species relate well to this, and boat control isn’t as critical.
      The walleye bite remains very scattered, reports of anglers catching fish on all baits, shallow and deep, the only common denominator is, only a few fish from each location. It’s safe to say walleyes aren’t schooled up as would be expected.
      Live bait rigs, a slip sinker or bottom bouncer, with a 3’-5’ snell, plain hook or spinner and beads using a crawler or leech is the preferred methods these days.
      Pike taking artificial crank baits by casting or trolling deep weed edges is attracting pike of all sizes.
      Casting stick baits, spoons or buck tails up to weed edges or clearing is working well for pike and smallies.
      No favored areas of the lake to fish with them being so scattered, however best reports coming from say Sugarbush Island down to the Ash River entrance into Kab.
      Some deeper water success on Namakan using jig and minnow in the 30’ plus depth range.
      Biting flies still a nuisance as are evening mosquitoes - be prepared. I might add, lots of UV rays so lotion up and enjoy your time in Beautiful Voyageurs National Park.
      BINGO continues on Kabetogama at the New Community Hall on Tuesday and Thursday Nights at 8:00pm.
      Great Time for Planning a Trip,
      See you Soon,
      Crabby Phil & Ellen Hart
  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • chucker1101
      These aren't campsites to bring your Ranger fiberglass or decked-out Lund into. They're better fitted for smaller 14-16 ft alum boats, something you can drag on shore. Though i'm sure you can figure out how to secure something bigger. Cliff is right, most have sandy/pebble shorelines to pull a smaller boat onto. Almost all of them are well-protected from the prevailing WSW wind. You're gonna get wakes rolling into shore from passing boats, though, as it's a pretty well traveled section of the lake.
    • brrrr
      I camped at a couple sites a few years ago.  no docks, but most of the sites had a half way decent place to put the boat in.  one had a decent log to tie to.  another I threw a couple anchors out back and was able to tie off to a couple trees to keep the boat close yet off the rocks. 
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      I do not think that there are docks at the overnight campsites but some do have sandy shorelines. Most of the shore lunch/picnic  sites do have docks but are not overnight camping sites. Cliff
    • Getanet
      Thanks for the info guys. Looks like I have some research to do. Chucker, do you know if Hinsdale Island has a place to dock a boat ?  I'd hate to have it banging against rocks all night.
    • Rick
      The new northern pike fishing regulations, which were announced recently and go into effect on the May 12 fishing opener, have three distinct zones to address the different characteristics of pike populations in Minnesota, according to the Department of Natural Resources.

      Each of the zones – north-central, northeast and south – provide protection for different sizes of pike, and there are reasons for those differences. “We’re continuing to let anglers know there are new pike regulations for those who want to keep pike on inland waters,” said Chris Kavanaugh, DNR northeast region fisheries manager. “We also want to share the thinking behind the new regulations.” North-central zone
      The north-central zone is the largest of the three zones, and here the possession limit is 10 northern pike, but only two can be longer than 26 inches; and all from 22 to 26 inches must be released. “We’re responding to angler concerns about the over-abundance of small, or hammer-handle, pike in the north-central zone,” Kavanaugh said. Through anglers keeping small fish but protecting the 22 to 26 inch pike, the objective in the north-central zone is to both reduce the abundance of small pike and allow medium size pike to grow larger. The advantages of growing larger pike are twofold. While protected these medium size pike will eat small pike, helping reduce abundance of small pike. And when they eventually grow out of the protected size range they will be a more desirable size for keeping. Southern zone
      In the southern zone, where reproduction is limited, the regulation intends to increase pike abundance while also improving the size of fish harvested. Anglers in the southern zone can keep two fish, but the minimum size is 24 inches. “The management issue in the southern zone is the opposite of what’s happening in the north-central zone,” Kavanaugh said. “With low reproduction, stocking is often necessary to provide a pike fishery in the south. Here we want to protect young pike and give them a chance to grow.” Growth rates are much faster in these southern lakes so most will reach the 24 inch keeper size in a few years. Northeastern zone
      In the northeastern zone, pike reproduction is good but these lakes do not have the high density problems of the north-central zone since they still have a nice balance of medium to large pike. Here, it makes sense to provide protection for large pike while they still exist. “The trophy pike of the Arrowhead Region have definitely made some great stories and photos over the decades,” Kavanaugh said. “But these fish grow slowly in the cold water and if too many anglers keep trophy pike here, they’ll be gone.” In the northeastern zone, anglers can keep two pike but must release all from 30 to 40 inches, with only one over 40 inches allowed in possession. Other considerations
      Anglers who want to keep pike will need to be prepared to measure them. Those planning to take advantage of the expanded bag limit on small pike should familiarize themselves with the extra cuts it takes to fillet the fish. New pike regulations do not affect border water fishing regulations or special regulations that cover individual lakes, rivers and streams. Darkhouse spearing regulations for pike differ slightly and those regulations are listed in the spearing section of the regulations booklet. For more information on the new zone regulations visit mndnr.gov/pike or contact a local area fisheries office. Contact information can be found at mndnr.gov/areas/fisheries or in the printed fishing regulations booklet. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The lingering cold weather is delaying ice-out on Minnesota lakes and rivers, which could make it difficult for DNR crews to have the 1,500 public water accesses it manages ready in time for the May 12 fishing opener. “I want Minnesotans to know that we are doing everything we can to get ready for the fishing opener,” said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr, “but mostly what we need are warmer temperatures and sunshine.” There are approximately 3,000 public water access sites statewide, and the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division manages about half of them. “Winter weather is always a challenge to Minnesota’s public water access sites,” said Nancy Stewart, water recreation program consultant. “Because of the late ice-out this year, DNR crews will have a shorter window than usual to get boat ramps and docks ready for the May 12 fishing opener, but we will have as many of them ready as possible.” Every year, repairs are needed at hundreds of sites, because freezing temperatures and ice cause concrete to crack and buckle on the ramps. In some years, crews can get a head start on that work, even before ice-out, but this year the snow has prevented them from assessing damage, and the ramps can’t be re-leveled until the ground thaws. In the meantime, crews are busy rehabbing docks by, for example, changing bumpers and wheels as needed so that they’ll be ready to pop in when the time comes. “Even if every last dock isn’t in by the opener, there will be places to fish and boat,” said Stewart. Helpful resources on the DNR’s Public Water Access website include: A map showing where ice-out has occurred. Phone numbers for DNR Area Offices for updates. Boaters and anglers can also get their questions answered by calling the DNR Info Center: 888-646-6367 (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday). Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Hunters are reminded that applications for bear hunting licenses are being accepted now through Friday, May 4, wherever Minnesota hunting and fishing license are sold, online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense and by telephone at 888-665-4236. A total of 3,350 licenses are available in 13 permit areas. Bear licenses cost $44 for residents and $230 for nonresidents, and there is a $5 application fee. The season is open from Saturday, Sept. 1, through Sunday, Oct. 14. Notification to lottery winners will be made by Friday, June 1. Lottery winners will receive a postcard in the mail and can check online at mndnr.gov/licenses/lotteries/index.html to see if they were drawn. The deadline to purchase licenses awarded by lottery will be Wednesday, Aug. 1. Any remaining unpurchased licenses will be available over the counter starting at noon on Monday, Aug. 6. An unlimited number of bear licenses will be sold over-the-counter for the no-quota area that includes east-central and far northwestern Minnesota. No-quota licenses are valid only in the no-quota area. Hunters with a no-quota license can harvest one bear. Bear hunting information is available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/hunting/bear. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • chucker1101
      There are 11 sites on/around Hinsdale Island, managed by the State DNR through one of the local parks (used to be Bear Island, it now might be Soudan Mine Park). Here's a link:  http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/destinations/state_parks/lake_vermilion_soudan_underground_mine/Hinsdale_map.pdf I think they're free to use, first come / first serve.  #11 is my favorite. I've heard that the ones on Hinsdale island have occasional visits from bears.
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Check the lakevermilion.com site for a list of public campsites on Lake Vermilion. Cliff
    • gunner55
      We'll be making a trip in to GR again. in the next couple days. See what it looks like then.