• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
      You know what we all love...

      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

Recommended Posts

Knowknot

Just wondering if anyone has any live emerald shiners left to sell, or if all that is left is frozen ones. Thanks,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hoey

I suggest checking with Steve at Log Cabin bait.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

Adrian's always used to have them to..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mozer

I have heard no live shiners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
anyfishwilldo

they only ran for a couple days.  They have them on the canadian side but its illegal to transport live bait across the border

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Iowabrewcrew

Funny...seems like when the Emerald run slowed down up there 4-5 years ago, the fishing followed suit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V
8 hours ago, Iowabrewcrew said:

Funny...seems like when the Emerald run slowed down up there 4-5 years ago, the fishing followed suit!

Agreed!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hookie

no live ones that I know of just frozen ones. I heard the run started good than the rain came and dirty the river and moved em back out into the lake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

Frozen ones work better in my opinion anyway. Haven't bought a live one in 10 years.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hookie

I've had very good luck with them also. Always pick some up before heading out on the lake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kfk

I like to fish a frozen shiner along with a live fathead on a single hook.  Even though the shiner is dead, I think the movement of the fathead creates the illusion that it's a live shiner.  It's worked for me many times anyway and it's usually better than either a frozen shiner or fathead by themselves.

Edited by kfk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CANOPY SAM

Interesting presentation, kfk.  I like that idea.

I think the typical predator fish in LOTW really keys in on the natural smell of these shiner minnows, as it's one of their primary forage base all year round.  Adding the movement of a live fathead to the "scent" of a shiner minnow, and of course the shimmer of those sparkling shiner minnow scales, is a very smart presentation!

I've done this same thing numerous times while fishing for pike under tip-ups.  I'll take a Whitefish (from LOTW) and cut it into slender, boneless strips of flesh, and add these "flaps" of whitefish to extra exposed barbs on my quick-strike treble hooks, with a large lively sucker minnow as the primary bait.  These strips of stinky whitefish fillets (they look like Uncle Josh Pork Rinds when cut up right) act to add action to the bait when that big sucker minnow swims and darts around under that tip-up.  It also adds a very specific, natural forage base "scent" to my baits that these big LOTW pike really key in on.  Takes just a bit more prep time, but it really adds dividends on days when the pike are a little picky.

I'm gonna try your fathead/frozen shiner "combo" presentation next time I'm up, kfk!  I really like this idea!!! ;)

One point to make, to those coming from a distance to LOTW.  I would hesitate to bring up shiner minnows from another location.  I've done this myself in the past, and I've had VERY limited success.  In my humble experience, these fish seem to really know the difference between baitfish that are natural to this lake vs. baitfish that have come from another body of water.  They have a remarkable sense of scent or smell, and I'm certain they can quickly tell what actually belongs in their lake, and what doesn't.  I could certainly be wrong.  These are just my humble observations. ;)

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowknot

Thanks for the responses. I think I will try the frozen shiner and fathead combination myself and see how it works this weekend. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert

 I have had my best luck up at LOTW  with chubs  on small jigs , and also have had good luck on a frozen Emerald shiner head on a jigging spoon ..   as for the previous mention by CANOPY SAM of sticking to Emerald shiners from local LOTW resorts or baitstores , vs shiners bought downstate , I agree 100 % ,as they are always a different type of shiner ,much different from each other .. as for CANOPY SAM's statement of the predator fish keying in on the scent of the shiners , I disagree , as Walleyes  don't feed by scent , it's all got to do with there lateral line on there side of there body .....  I do think with the pike , the scent does attract... Good luck Knowknot up on the huge pond .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

I disagree on the scent thing. Have had many times out there where the fish wouldn't go in a spot and as soon as I sprayed the minnow with Gulp spray it was lights out. Had the same experience with crappies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert
2 hours ago, PRO-V said:

I disagree on the scent thing. Have had many times out there where the fish wouldn't go in a spot and as soon as I sprayed the minnow with Gulp spray it was lights out. Had the same experience with crappies. 

I think it has more to do with taste vs smell . I think if it tastes good to the fish ,then they will tend to hold on longer ,  thus giving you a better probability and percentage of a hook set vs the fish blowing the bait out . I do believe that soft plastics that are impregnated with scent do have there time and place  vs the spraying of scents onto the bait . I'm just talking about Walleye and scent and taste ..  obviously some fish thrive on seeking out and biting a stinky , rotten smelling and tasting bait , such as Catfish  and Sturgeon..    these are my opinions... PRO-V , you do your thing and I will do mine .. I'm glad we both love fishing., and best of luck to you in the future in pursuit of those fish ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seifjr

Just curious about the "lateral line" comment, if you're fishing with just a minnow head, wouldn't that be more of a of a scent/taste trigger, as you've pinched off the lateral lines of the minnow?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

My experience wasn't getting them to hold on, it was them taking a bite at all. This usually involved vertical jigging. Guess we all have our own theories and methods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowknot

When you say "chubs", do you mean creek chubs, or rainbow chubs? And where do you get them around Baudette?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert
21 hours ago, seifjr said:

Just curious about the "lateral line" comment, if you're fishing with just a minnow head, wouldn't that be more of a of a scent/taste trigger, as you've pinched off the lateral lines of the minnow?

Hey there seifjr ! The lateral line I was speaking of is on the Walleyes sides , not the on the minnow. It runs down the sides of a walleye , about right in the center , length wise , from head to tail. This line is a nerve/sense organ that senses vibrations , movements , pressure changes . Walleyes use this sense to respond to minnow , and/or other food sources movements when they are feeding ,as there eyesight can be limited at times with heavily stained , churned up , algae bloomed waters .this line helps detect there food source.. Bait movement in the water creates vibrations , these vibrations are detected by the LL allowing the walleye to search out and react to the bait that created such movements.... As for your thoughts on just using a dead minnows head would create a scent/taste trigger . It's the vibration/movement of the jigging action , and/or the built in rattles on jigs or spoons , or the up/down pounding of the bottom of the lake that you create that can help the Walleye detect just where your bait is and react , hopefully with a strike of your bait and a fish fry to follow .... Good luck !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfatbert
12 hours ago, Knowknot said:

When you say "chubs", do you mean creek chubs, or rainbow chubs? And where do you get them around Baudette?

 To answer your question Knowknot ,  just regular chub or fathead minnows offered at most bait shops , either up LOTW way , or throughout the state ,  is what I have had my best luck with  . Some people prefer rainbows , which also are usually quite readily found any where...    You mentioned creek chubs , well I do like to use a fairly large creek chubs 5"-6" or so in the spring open water , and/or summertime on a jig or lindy ,  and in certain lakes ... They are not available in winter , that I know of , but boy oh boy , I sure would like to try them under a tip up for Walleyes if I could ......      Oh yah ,some baitstores will have mixed in with there chubs/fatheads a breed of minnow called a Dace . I personally avoid these stores , as I have found a big difference between a Dace and a fathead/chub for successfully catching Walleyes ....  Good luck !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowknot

Thanks for the good information, I think I am going to try some rainbows and fatheads both and hope for the best. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V
On 2/27/2018 at 5:29 PM, Bigfatbert said:

 I have had my best luck up at LOTW  with chubs  on small jigs , and also have had good luck on a frozen Emerald shiner head on a jigging spoon ..   as for the previous mention by CANOPY SAM of sticking to Emerald shiners from local LOTW resorts or baitstores , vs shiners bought downstate , I agree 100 % ,as they are always a different type of shiner ,much different from each other .. as for CANOPY SAM's statement of the predator fish keying in on the scent of the shiners , I disagree , as Walleyes  don't feed by scent , it's all got to do with there lateral line on there side of there body .....  I do think with the pike , the scent does attract... Good luck Knowknot up on the huge pond .

 - Interesting facts on walleye by John Vance

 

During the research for my book "Walleye Biology and Behaviour" from a fisherman's point of view, I found a host of interesting facts about the walleye. Here are just a few:

Walleye have their ‘taste buds' in their lips - thousands of them!

Walleye are ‘long distance' swimmers, and few ‘prey' species can outdistance them. It is believed that walleye can ‘smell' their prey, quite a distance away, using their keen sense of smell. Too, they use their lateral line to find such schools of minnows.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Better Than Working!

Fishing Rainy River this fall and the baits with scent on them dramatically out fished those that were not scented. I have seen this occur time after time. If walleye don,t feed by scent then there is no harm in using scent, but if they do and you don't have the right scent your success will be diminished. Just my thoughts! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PRO-V

From In-Fisherman:

Smell and Taste
Because they must detect molecules of substances dissolved in water, a walleye’s senses of smell and taste are more closely linked than humans. While this makes it hard for researchers to determine which stimuli they respond to, there’s little doubt scent and flavor play a role in feeding behavior. A fish’s chemoreception (including both smell and taste) is also critical for avoiding predators, locating fish of the same species, coordinating spawning time, and homing in to residence areas and spawning sites.

Judging by the design of its olfactory organ, a walleyes’ sense of smell probably falls somewhere between channel catfish and members of the sunfish family, and walleyes are likely able to detect amino acids in a dilution of several parts per 10 million. Studies have shown walleyes respond favorably to various amino acids and salt solutions, while fish mucus, essences of walleye body parts, and other amino acids repel them. It’s no surprise that walleyes smell well, considering that livebait is often the only answer to a tough bite and finicky fish. Taste is likewise important, often spurring the decision whether to spit a bait or swallow it.



Read more: http://www.in-fisherman.com/biology/walleye-senses/#ixzz58ajHqz8n

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Finns
      Grand Lake Oklahoma with 23 other fellows!  22nd annual trip!  Kind of a get together.
    • Northlander
      If you can find a Gen 2 9" touch get it. I love mine.
    • Northlander
      Shimano Sedonas are work horses for the buck too.
    • Northlander
      Charge your battery after every use. Your not getting enough charging when not running big motor enough. Other option is to move up a size in battery if room. I have ran Interstates for years with no issues.
    • K-dub
      Today while running a spinner in Big Bay Walleye haunts. Released; would love to find more of these! 
    • Car7x
      Hi - this may not be the exact best spot for this, but

      1). I flyfish, elk and deer hunt out of my simple, clean off grid cabin 11 m S of Ennis.
      Excellent elk, muley, whitetail, and pronghorn opportunities, E slope of Gravelly range. 2 m N of current Wigwam fire - no problem.I have more time than hunting partners and need solid, easy going buddies to hunt with, and or will time share swap with others for access to great hunting.

      2) I have 230+ acres of outstanding pheasant, whitetail, waterfowl, and some turkey just E of Granite Falls MN. If you are local and have bear, deer, turkey, etc., opportunities, especially closer to the Metro, Let's Talk. This land is also for sale, I'm tightening up my footprint and want to build on my Bozeman lot on the Gallatin.

      I am very interested in:
      - whitetail tree stand, including doe management opportunities (especially local for me in zone 610 MN) - gotta fill the freezer!
      - spot and stalk anything anywhere
      - turkey
      - winter southern or warm weather opportunities, including fly fishing..pigs?
    • monstermoose78
      Yeah geese and mallards were flying today
    • Fish Head
      I'll give the noise supressor a try Bob.  Both units were purchased at the same time.    yoppdk- I checked my unit and I don't see any such setting on the 998.  There is a low battery alarm setting, but that is already turned to off. 
    • Hoey
      This terminal could have been comprised, cracked or corroded to cause this.  
    • Hoey
      Geese are beginning to flock as I seen a number flying over the past couple days.