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OhioVike

I have $50 to spend on Musky lures for a 14 year old boy.  Last fall he caught a nice musky, from my kayak, and was unable to land it to get a picture.  He did get it up to the kayak several times so he got a good look at it and has been bit by the Musky Fishing Bug.  I am looking for suggestions for the young man and was hoping to get some help here.  

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LBerquist

What got me hooked on musky fishing when I was a kid was topwater. Nothing more exciting than watching the water explode. My first musky came on a rubber frog while bass fishing, my little brother casted over my line and as I lectured him and reeled my line up as quick as I could, WHAM. Since then I have had some of my best memories from topwater. Poe's giant jackpot, prop baits, creepers, klack/buzz bait. He's going to spend a lot of time casting, giving him something to watch helps pass the time and when he gets follows they will normally be shallow so he will be able to see them. 

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TomWehler

Total agree Topwater mix rules for a kid learning to muskie fish.  Kayak ~~~ At 14 years can by now control the craft & cast pretty well so mix of small to medium size bucktails and a glider or two kick it any time.  Host of things to purchase out there but really no need. Keep it simple, have fun, learn the lake, the fish, the food....he will enjoy it an be hooked for long long time.  And will he succeed ~ YES indeed ~ 96 & 3/4 percent ~  guaranteed.   : )     Keep on rocken!    T

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Frank Boling 41

Hey Tommy,

Glad to see you're still rocken!.

Frank

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Cliff Wagenbach

Hi Frank!

Good to see that you are still hanging around the FM site!

Cliff

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Frank Boling 41

Hi Cliff!

I'm planning a trip up there in next few weeks...Hope to see you.

Frank

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ZachD

If he is going to fish them from a kayak I would suggest getting him a boga grip that way he can get it out of the water

 

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OhioVike

He will be fishing primarily from a boat in 2018!

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JTeeth

A return client for a couple years brought fish grips with him... After watching him mangle a couple fish I asked him not to bring them anymore. Big fish need more care when landing in my experience. I hand land most muskies. This helps with not bringing a green (not ready) fish into the boat to hurt itself and the boat. With musky fishing growing in popularity I'm noticing a lot more fish with net scars from green fish. For a young musky angler learn correct technique early. The scars after a 4 fish day are a badge of honor. One of the best gifts I've received for my musky gear is a good pair of wire cutters. I use them to cut hooks in an emergency or out of a poorly hooked fish. Or if you can find it...a jar of musky slime cologne, my wife loves it. Ha! Good luck

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • LakeofthewoodsMN
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