• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
      You know what we all love...

      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

monstermoose78

Live updates

Recommended Posts

ANYFISH2

Well,  it was a typical morning hunting turkeys.  

 

This season has been a bit different for me than past years. I was hunting "new" property that i didnt know well and I had neglected to apply for my typical A season tag.  In turn, I planned on the first 2 seasons were devoted to the kids.  I did my usual early morning roost gobble runs and late afternoon field checks.  These confirmed we had birds around, but rarely did they use the field. So a "deep" woods hunt would be in order. 

To keep this short, the goal of getting the kids out and a bird was met with frustration and missed chances.  The boy only wanted to go the first 2 days and the daughter i got out for one morning sit.  That was it for 2 weeks,  but i continued to get up early and try and then continue my long range scouting.

Wednesday comes and it is the start of "my" season.  Took the morning off of work, and to the blind I go.  Beautiful icy cold weather greeted the start of the hunt.  The birds were quiet on the roost, but made themselves know once on the ground.  However, like most 3 seasons, the toms were locked in on the real hens.  They would pass by me a couple times but never come to my set.

 

Work beckoned me Wednesday afternoon and Thursday.

 

Friday, back out to the blind.  Once again no gobbling on the roost? Strange. Then again about 6 birds on onthe ground the SE of me gobbling away.  They would repeatedly work to about 70 yds of me back and forth.  Again, never leave the real hens.  His would go on till 10 am.  The things go quiet.  I would spend the 3 hrs, walking calling,  waiting and repeating.  Not one gobble!  At 2 pm i make my way back to the blind for the afternoon, took a little nap.  As i awake i have a splitting headach.  I try and fight through it, planning on moving the blind to where the birds seem to spend time after fly down.  The headache is too much, i just pack up a go home at 6.  I would sleep the rest of the night.

 

Saturday morning arrives, feeling refreshed.  In the blind i go, the birds actually gobbled on roost this morning!  They are some distance away.  I keep thinking i needed to go to the SE and sit by a tree and wait.  But i fear i may bump hens or quiet birds at that time of morning.  So i sit tight and wait.  Like clockwork, after flydown the gobbles get closer and closer.  Again, stopping about 70 yds away, not wanting to leave the live hens.  This morning, i decide to call softer, but more often.  Soon i get to talking to a live hen.  Lo and behold she works her way closer and the gobblers follow! Now they get closer, but not nearly close enough.

I hear a new gobble directly behind me, it is very close, so I ready myself.  Well, it seems this new gobbler has made the hens and original gobblers retreat back over the ridge.  I call, but they will not get closer.  

Soon i hear some rustling, so i peak out the NE window, i seen 3 turkeys working towards my set about 45 yds out. Sit back down and ready myself.  Seconds later i see 3 jakes step out onto the trail. Thier mind is already made up as they work quickly to the decoy.  One is in half strut the whole time.  I Look them over and decide i will take the half strutter, looks to be the biggest bird.  Took some time for them to separate to give me a clean shot. Jake is down.

19.09lbs  5" beard  2/16 & 3/16 spurs.

 

 

  • Thumbs Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
monstermoose78

That is a good sized jake

  • Thumbs Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ANYFISH2

Here is some pics.

20170429_093731.thumb.jpg.e81ea2a6972e2641653797c42464f8c2.jpg

20170429_070113.thumb.jpg.a63e0a49b4b980c79f56977ec12cd6ad.jpg20170429_093009.thumb.jpg.a80d9fd8697671faa6234eb5ad462a56.jpg

20170429_070311.thumb.jpg.d6d4fe127d90c1e65ff74dfd1f2187e8.jpg

He definitely weighed more than i thought!

 

  • Thumbs Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
monstermoose78

Congrats!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • leech~~
      You took this with a cell phone?  What one do you have? Great shot. 
    • papadarv
      Live north side Coon Lake, Anoka Co. Bear cought on Ring month ago 1/4 mile south of Coon Lake on Lexington Ave.  
    • mtheis
      I have version 8 as well.  1' contours.  Where I fish it has proven to be extremely accurate.  
    • Kow
      Hi looking for anyone who is interested in trying a new fishing app that allows you to measure, weigh and track fish with your phone. If you are interested in being one of the first people to help shape and build this tool please visit https://www.weighin.io and sign up. Thank you. 
    • tarpon6
      It was West of Canfield. The East end of Comet was behind me.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources invites visitors to Mille Lacs Kathio State Park to join members of the Minnesota Archaeological Society on Sept. 28 for Archaeology Day. Attendees will learn about the region’s 9,000 years of human history, and how this contributed to the designation of the park as a National Historic Landmark. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the park picnic area. “Demonstrations, activities and displays will advance everyone’s knowledge of the park and Minnesota history, no matter what their age,” said Kris Erickson, park manager. “The park’s beautiful fall colors will offer an added perk.” During the day, visitors can: Watch how “flint knapping” transforms a piece of stone into a tool. See the way prehistoric pottery was created. Observe an excavation where artifacts were discovered. Examine a spear, and watch a spear-throwing demonstration. Learn to shoot an arrow with instructors from the Archery in the Park program. Minnesota Archaeological Society publications as well as books and pamphlets from the Minnesota Historical Society, Maritime Heritage Minnesota, St. Cloud State University and other sources will be available. Archeology films will run continuously in the Interpretive Center. The DNR is sponsoring the event, along with the Minnesota Archaeological Society and St. Cloud State University. There is no charge for Archaeology Day activities. A vehicle permit is required to enter Minnesota state parks. Vehicle permits may be purchased at the park office. The cost of a daily permit is $7. An annual permit, which allows entry into all state parks for one year from the date of purchase, is $35. Mille Lacs Kathio State Park is located 8 miles north of Onamia, and 14 miles south of Garrison on U.S. Highway 169. For more information, call the park at 320-532-3523. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Minnesotans interested in helping the Department of Natural Resources determine how Game and Fish Fund dollars are spent now have through Friday, Oct. 11, to apply to serve on a review committee.  Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million is deposited into this fund annually. The DNR needs at least 12 people to serve on the fisheries oversight and wildlife oversight committees (a minimum of 6 for each committee). About half of the current members’ terms expire on Saturday, Dec. 14. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund report in detail. People who want to serve should have a strong interest in natural resource management, how it is funded, financial review and working together. The goal is for the committee to have members from across the state with diverse perspectives and backgrounds. DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen will appoint committee members for two-year terms. Applications are available on the DNR website, along with more information about the fund, expenditure reports and oversight committee reports. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Counties collect Payment in Lieu of Taxes for state-owned land not subject to property tax Minnesota’s 87 counties are the beneficiaries of $35.9 million in state payments that help support public lands.  The state’s Department of Revenue recently distributed annual payments for Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), a property tax relief program that offsets tax revenues not collected on public lands. Counties have received PILT payments annually since 1979 in place of property taxes on 5.6 million acres of state-managed lands and 2.8 million acres of county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Money for the payments comes from the state’s general fund. Every county in Minnesota has public lands within its borders and receives an annual PILT payment. In July, counties received anywhere from $21,443 in Red Lake County up to $3,792,842 in St. Louis County. “PILT is an important and consistent revenue source for counties, but the benefits of public lands for Minnesotans go far beyond these annual payments,” said Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Public lands support local economies through timber and mineral production, provide space for outdoor recreation and tourism, create habitat for wildlife, and help provide clean air and water.” The state makes PILT payments on public lands including state parks and forests, scientific and natural areas and wildlife management areas, school trust lands, Consolidated-Conservation lands as well as county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Even lands that could never be developed and placed on the tax rolls are included in PILT calculations used to compensate counties. Payment rates vary according to land type and range from $2 per acre, to three-quarters of 1 percent of appraised value. Payment for Lake Vermilion Soudan Underground Mine State Park is assessed at 1.5 percent of the appraised value of the land. A breakdown of PILT payments for each county is posted on the Minnesota Department of Revenue website. More information about Minnesota’s public land portfolio, PILT payments, and a brief history of major public land transactions is available on the DNR’s public lands page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding lake property owners to carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage.  This is important, as several new zebra mussel confirmations in recent years were initially reported by people removing docks, boats and boat lifts. “These late summer/early fall confirmations are the result of Minnesotans being more vigilant and checking for invasive species when taking equipment out of the water,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit supervisor Heidi Wolf. It’s especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive. Anyone transporting a dock or lift from the adjacent shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a permit, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners: Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period. Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species. Contact your area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if you think you have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in your lake. More information is available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Watching the sun rise over a marsh is an awe-inspiring experience, a memory bank deposit that for many duck hunters is as valuable as the number of birds they bag. Yet, every year some duck hunters find themselves in bad situations, the result of falls into cold water, mishaps with their firearms, or other incidents that may forever cloud what’s supposed to be an enjoyable experience.  As Minnesota’s waterfowl hunting season gets underway Saturday, Sept. 21, Department of Natural Resources conservation officers remind hunters to ensure their hunting and safety gear is in good condition before heading afield. Once they’re hunting, adhering to the key tenets of safe firearms handling is the best way to reduce the risk they’ll be involved in what could be a life-changing incident. “Safe hunts are successful hunts, but they don’t just happen on their own,” said Jon Paurus, DNR Enforcement Division education program coordinator. “It’s up to hunters to put themselves in safe situations.” For those who use boats during their hunt, that means thinking of themselves as boaters. Wearing a life jacket is the best way to avoid drowning. Colder water this time of year increases the likelihood of cold water shock and hypothermia. Duck hunters should tell someone else where they’re going and when they plan to return, and have a communication device such as a cell phone or radio along with them. Overloaded boats also are susceptible to capsizing or swamping, so it’s important to pack only the gear that’s necessary and distribute it as evenly as possible. Each year, duck hunters also are involved in firearms-related incidents that lead to injury or death. The three most common factors are careless handling, not knowing the safe zone of fire and not being sure of what’s beyond the target. By following the four tenets of safe firearms handling, hunters can avoid most firearms and hunting-related incidents: Treat each firearm as if it is loaded. Always control the muzzle of the firearm. Be sure of the target and what’s beyond. Keep finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot. ### Discuss below - to view set the hook here.