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  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
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      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

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  • Similar Content

    • MN BassFisher
      By MN BassFisher
      @bassfshin24 and I snuck up to Mille Lacs for 2 days of fishing recently. We were targeting Walleye near shallow structure in the low light hours and bumping out a bit deeper during mid-day. The first day was slow for us but we found more action on Day 2 including my 2nd biggest Walleye through the ice. I also caught my first tagged Walleye! Pay attention for my slip and fall...
       
       
       
    • AdamT
      By AdamT
      I have a week trip planned for opening week on the big pond.  Should I reschedule?  I know the record ice out for that lake is May 16th. Does it look like that will be broken this year?
    • MN BassFisher
      By MN BassFisher
      My buddy Tony (@bassfshin24) and I hit the road after Christmas to go and chase some Walleyes on Mille Lacs Lake. We had plans to fish shallow structure during the low light hours and then head out to deeper structure during the day using an ATV. Day 1 the temps had warmed up some from the recent negative temps but we were surprised to find a very slow bite. The slow day was topped off by some ATV problems which left us scratching our heads on what to do for Day 2. As it turned out our options were minimal so we decided to pull out on the lake by hand to some shallow structure. It was -15 when we hit the lake but we were greeted by a bunch of hungry Walleye!
       
    • RiverChuckNorris
      By RiverChuckNorris
      My first foray into tv land.  Grant invited me to co-host an early ice episode on Mille Lacs last week.  We showed up like any weekend warrior with no intel and proceeded to try to figure the lake out.
      This is just the teaser.  The full episode will air in January and then be available on Superior Angling's YouTube channel.
      Give it a share/like if you enjoy it.  Thanks in advance!
    • MN Fishing Guy
      By MN Fishing Guy
      Got on the west side yesterday from 10 till 3.  Smallmouth were snapping in 15 - 17 FOW on green tubes with red flakes.  Three 20 inch plus footballs. 20 fish total.  Two came up barfing out crawfish.  Had two incidental google eyes 14 and 15 inches.  All the fish were extremely fat and well fed.  Great day on the water, very few boats.  Shout out to Terry's, great place to launch and close to the action! 
    • Stick in Mud
      By Stick in Mud
      It's shaping up to be a very good year on the Big Pond....Lots of people are catching lots of fish.  Let's start a new thread to share some tips, tricks, and photos.  
      The talk I'm hearing is that there are lots of fish out deep, but most of them are shorties.  Fewer fish up shallow, but a better chance at catching some bigger ones.  So shallow I went.  Plus, pulling a 100 lb. sled and auger made the decision a little easier, too. 
      I set up Stick in Mud the Elder in Secret Spot #3 in about 7 ft of water.  I hole hopped outside in depths ranging from 7 to 14 ft. It took us maybe 10 minutes to get our first fish, and throughout the next two hours we ended up catching six more.  Nothing crazy like the reports/photos I'm seeing/hearing from others, but we got two keepers and one big girl.  My buddy caught 16 last night--and sent me a photo of every single one of them--but only one of them was over 18''.  Of our seven, two were about 19'' and the big one was about 25'', give or take a bit.   
      It's time to get out on the ice.
       
       

    • BringAnExtension
      By BringAnExtension
      The DNR has announced quotas for the ice fishing season, regulations coming forth soon.
      http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2015/10/19/mille-lacs-winter-harvest-cap-set-ice-fishing-regulation-decision-by-end-of-month/#more-17141
      #AsExpected
    • BringAnExtension
      By BringAnExtension
      Governor Dayton is not going to wait for the fall surveys before declaring that the walleye ice fishing season will go on.
      http://www.startribune.com/dayton-says-they-ll-be-a-walleye-season-this-winter-on-mille-lacs/326440461/
       
    • Rick
      By Rick
      The DNR announced today that it has begun implementing several concrete steps aimed at improving the Mille Lacs Lake walleye population, while building a closer working relationship with the Mille Lacs community. “Mille Lacs is an incredibly important fishery for … Full Story
      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      By Rick
      Other fishing on Mille Lacs unaffected, remains strong and near record highs
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that last week’s creel survey on estimated walleye harvests, releases, and kill on Mille Lacs Lake during the first two weeks of July showed drastic increases that could result in the state reaching its limit by July 29.
      Despite the ongoing challenges with the walleye population, other fishing on the lake remains strong and near record highs. DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr stressed that anglers should take advantage of the continuation of liberal northern pike and smallmouth bass regulations on the lake.
      “Mille Lacs Lake remains one of the premiere fishing destinations in the state,” Landwehr said. “Northern pike and smallmouth bass are at or near record highs. Anglers should take advantage of the liberal regulations for these species. DNR tagging studies also indicate that muskies larger than 50 inches have never been more abundant.”
      During the first seven months of the monitoring period (December 2014 – June 2015) walleye harvest rates were at or below predicted levels, based on tight regulations adopted for the open-water season. Based upon those results, total harvest was expected to be below the State’s 28,600-pound limit for this twelve-month period and the DNR’s June 30 creel study showed the state was within 15,300 pounds of reaching the annual quota.
      However, as of July 15, when the last angler survey was conducted, the state was within just 3,000 pounds of reaching the annual quota. Records also show it was only the second time in 30 years that Mille Lacs walleye catch rates in July were higher than the second half of June. This dramatic spike is believed to be due to unusual circumstances – including the high catch rates over the 4th of July and warm water temperatures (the third highest on record). Warm water greatly increases walleye mortality on fish that had to be released because they did not fall within the harvest slot. The so-called “hooking mortality” of walleyes that die after being released counts toward the state quota.
      Gov. Mark Dayton has directed the DNR to wait until after the next creel survey which will cover the period from July 16 to July 31, to see if the most recent numbers are an aberration. During that time, officials at the DNR, the Office of Tourism, and Department of Employment and Economic Development will meet with resort owners and other affected stakeholders on Mille Lacs to discuss the situation and seek recommendations.
      A federal court decision legally requires state officials to abide by the limit agreed upon with the eight Chippewa bands for each year. After the next creel report is received, the commissioner will take the necessary actions. It should be emphasized, however, that if the state determines it has exceeded its harvest allotment, the commissioner will be legally required to suspend fishing for walleye on the lake. 
       
      The DNR has met with the Minnesota tribes who harvest on Mille Lacs, as well as the executive administrator of the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission on the situation and shared fisheries data with them. There is mutual concern to respond to the increased harvest and take steps necessary to protect the walleye population.
      Earlier this year, the DNR also met with Mille Lacs Lake business owners and anglers to discuss the struggling walleye population and the risks of going over the lower quota. The DNR, Department of Employment and Economic Development, and Explore Minnesota Tourism will continue working with area resorts and businesses to gather their input, assess the impact of fishing conditions on area businesses, and work with the community as a decision is made on the continuation of the fishing season.
      Additional Background on the Mille Lacs Lake Walleye Quota
      Since 2008, not enough young walleye are surviving to maturity and replenishing the Mille Lacs Lake population. As a result, Mille Lacs walleye numbers are currently at a 30-year low. In response, the state instituted more restrictive walleye regulations this year in order to protect young walleyes so they could grow older.
      In fact, this year Mille Lacs’ 2015 walleye safe harvest level was deliberately reduced from 60,000 to 40,000 pounds so that more fish could potentially survive and spawn to improve the walleye population. Under this year’s quota, state anglers can harvest up to 28,600 pounds of walleye, and the eight Chippewa bands with 1837 Treaty harvest rights can harvest up to 11,400 pounds of walleye. Anglers are able to keep one walleye that is 19- to 21-inches long, or longer than 28 inches.
      Despite this year’s low walleye population, DNR fishery surveys have shown this year that there may be good news on the horizon. Biologists are seeing a large population of young walleyes hatched in 2013. Walleyes in that group are currently 10-to 13-inches long. It is important to protect those fish so they can contribute to future angling success and walleye production.
      Information on Mille Lacs management can be found at www.mndnr.gov/millelacslake. This year’s fishing regulations are on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/fishmn
  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • leech~~
      You took this with a cell phone?  What one do you have? Great shot. 
    • papadarv
      Live north side Coon Lake, Anoka Co. Bear cought on Ring month ago 1/4 mile south of Coon Lake on Lexington Ave.  
    • mtheis
      I have version 8 as well.  1' contours.  Where I fish it has proven to be extremely accurate.  
    • Kow
      Hi looking for anyone who is interested in trying a new fishing app that allows you to measure, weigh and track fish with your phone. If you are interested in being one of the first people to help shape and build this tool please visit https://www.weighin.io and sign up. Thank you. 
    • tarpon6
      It was West of Canfield. The East end of Comet was behind me.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources invites visitors to Mille Lacs Kathio State Park to join members of the Minnesota Archaeological Society on Sept. 28 for Archaeology Day. Attendees will learn about the region’s 9,000 years of human history, and how this contributed to the designation of the park as a National Historic Landmark. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the park picnic area. “Demonstrations, activities and displays will advance everyone’s knowledge of the park and Minnesota history, no matter what their age,” said Kris Erickson, park manager. “The park’s beautiful fall colors will offer an added perk.” During the day, visitors can: Watch how “flint knapping” transforms a piece of stone into a tool. See the way prehistoric pottery was created. Observe an excavation where artifacts were discovered. Examine a spear, and watch a spear-throwing demonstration. Learn to shoot an arrow with instructors from the Archery in the Park program. Minnesota Archaeological Society publications as well as books and pamphlets from the Minnesota Historical Society, Maritime Heritage Minnesota, St. Cloud State University and other sources will be available. Archeology films will run continuously in the Interpretive Center. The DNR is sponsoring the event, along with the Minnesota Archaeological Society and St. Cloud State University. There is no charge for Archaeology Day activities. A vehicle permit is required to enter Minnesota state parks. Vehicle permits may be purchased at the park office. The cost of a daily permit is $7. An annual permit, which allows entry into all state parks for one year from the date of purchase, is $35. Mille Lacs Kathio State Park is located 8 miles north of Onamia, and 14 miles south of Garrison on U.S. Highway 169. For more information, call the park at 320-532-3523. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Minnesotans interested in helping the Department of Natural Resources determine how Game and Fish Fund dollars are spent now have through Friday, Oct. 11, to apply to serve on a review committee.  Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million is deposited into this fund annually. The DNR needs at least 12 people to serve on the fisheries oversight and wildlife oversight committees (a minimum of 6 for each committee). About half of the current members’ terms expire on Saturday, Dec. 14. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund report in detail. People who want to serve should have a strong interest in natural resource management, how it is funded, financial review and working together. The goal is for the committee to have members from across the state with diverse perspectives and backgrounds. DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen will appoint committee members for two-year terms. Applications are available on the DNR website, along with more information about the fund, expenditure reports and oversight committee reports. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Counties collect Payment in Lieu of Taxes for state-owned land not subject to property tax Minnesota’s 87 counties are the beneficiaries of $35.9 million in state payments that help support public lands.  The state’s Department of Revenue recently distributed annual payments for Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), a property tax relief program that offsets tax revenues not collected on public lands. Counties have received PILT payments annually since 1979 in place of property taxes on 5.6 million acres of state-managed lands and 2.8 million acres of county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Money for the payments comes from the state’s general fund. Every county in Minnesota has public lands within its borders and receives an annual PILT payment. In July, counties received anywhere from $21,443 in Red Lake County up to $3,792,842 in St. Louis County. “PILT is an important and consistent revenue source for counties, but the benefits of public lands for Minnesotans go far beyond these annual payments,” said Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Public lands support local economies through timber and mineral production, provide space for outdoor recreation and tourism, create habitat for wildlife, and help provide clean air and water.” The state makes PILT payments on public lands including state parks and forests, scientific and natural areas and wildlife management areas, school trust lands, Consolidated-Conservation lands as well as county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Even lands that could never be developed and placed on the tax rolls are included in PILT calculations used to compensate counties. Payment rates vary according to land type and range from $2 per acre, to three-quarters of 1 percent of appraised value. Payment for Lake Vermilion Soudan Underground Mine State Park is assessed at 1.5 percent of the appraised value of the land. A breakdown of PILT payments for each county is posted on the Minnesota Department of Revenue website. More information about Minnesota’s public land portfolio, PILT payments, and a brief history of major public land transactions is available on the DNR’s public lands page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding lake property owners to carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage.  This is important, as several new zebra mussel confirmations in recent years were initially reported by people removing docks, boats and boat lifts. “These late summer/early fall confirmations are the result of Minnesotans being more vigilant and checking for invasive species when taking equipment out of the water,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit supervisor Heidi Wolf. It’s especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive. Anyone transporting a dock or lift from the adjacent shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a permit, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners: Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period. Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species. Contact your area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if you think you have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in your lake. More information is available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Watching the sun rise over a marsh is an awe-inspiring experience, a memory bank deposit that for many duck hunters is as valuable as the number of birds they bag. Yet, every year some duck hunters find themselves in bad situations, the result of falls into cold water, mishaps with their firearms, or other incidents that may forever cloud what’s supposed to be an enjoyable experience.  As Minnesota’s waterfowl hunting season gets underway Saturday, Sept. 21, Department of Natural Resources conservation officers remind hunters to ensure their hunting and safety gear is in good condition before heading afield. Once they’re hunting, adhering to the key tenets of safe firearms handling is the best way to reduce the risk they’ll be involved in what could be a life-changing incident. “Safe hunts are successful hunts, but they don’t just happen on their own,” said Jon Paurus, DNR Enforcement Division education program coordinator. “It’s up to hunters to put themselves in safe situations.” For those who use boats during their hunt, that means thinking of themselves as boaters. Wearing a life jacket is the best way to avoid drowning. Colder water this time of year increases the likelihood of cold water shock and hypothermia. Duck hunters should tell someone else where they’re going and when they plan to return, and have a communication device such as a cell phone or radio along with them. Overloaded boats also are susceptible to capsizing or swamping, so it’s important to pack only the gear that’s necessary and distribute it as evenly as possible. Each year, duck hunters also are involved in firearms-related incidents that lead to injury or death. The three most common factors are careless handling, not knowing the safe zone of fire and not being sure of what’s beyond the target. By following the four tenets of safe firearms handling, hunters can avoid most firearms and hunting-related incidents: Treat each firearm as if it is loaded. Always control the muzzle of the firearm. Be sure of the target and what’s beyond. Keep finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot. ### Discuss below - to view set the hook here.