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Lawrence Luoma

UPL tips for newbies!!

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Lawrence Luoma

Guys I wanted a start a thread to help out the new teams get off to a great start this UPL season. So lets here the best tips for the experienced teams!!

I'll start off with this tip. Measure and weigh each of your fish to get your best 7 and 7 gills and crappies plus bonus fish. There are many times when a 8.5 inch gill weighs more than a 9 inch gill and same with crappies. Don't just eye ball each fish and assume it weighs more.

To add to it also pay attention and weigh some fish while prefishing. There are many lakes were the 8.5 inch average gill will weigh more the the average 9 inch gill. So the goal would be to find the areas and target the 8.5 inch gills.

Many teams use digital kitchen scales and use grams to get the best comparison between fish.

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Kyle From

Thanks for opening up this thread. I have one of the new teams this year so this is helpful and much appreciated.

Do the digital fish scales out there typically not get to a low enough weight to compare pannies?

Thanks,

Kyle From

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Lawrence Luoma

It's why most teams run a digital scale that weighs in grams. I'm testing out the rapala tournament scales that hang this year to see if they make a difference.

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Lawrence Luoma

Another tip is two bring a good water scoop for your fish bucket and change your water and least 3-4 times during tourney hours. Keeping your fish alive and fresh seem to save weight. Having a good scoop makes changing the water easier and gets you back to fishing faster during tourney hours.

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MN BassFisher

These are two things that I wondered about - fish scales for panfish and tips on keeping fish alive and available for a cull.

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Cyberfish

Great idea!

In my first winter UPL ever, I just went out on the edges of the main community holes, and used the techniques I was most comfortable with, and did a lot of hole hopping. When a lot of people fish a deep basin, they can move the fish off just a bit,and you would be surprised on how much you can catch by just making little moves! I ended up winning that contest, and I still cash in doing that often! it is also a good tip for weekend anglers who don't have time off during the week to find those secret honey holes!

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Lawrence Luoma

It also helps to have two buckets (each partner having one). There fore you can swap fish while knocking off ice off the other when its real cold.

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Gridlocked

I keep a cheap egg-timer in my rod box. Set it to 5-10 minutes and when the bell rings I will change up my bait, color or presentation. I found myself getting married to whatever jig or bait I was using. You can also use a timer on your phone, but the more it comes out of your pocket, the more likely it is to find the water.

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Lawrence Luoma

I keep a cheap egg-timer in my rod box. Set it to 5-10 minutes and when the bell rings I will change up my bait, color or presentation. I found myself getting married to whatever jig or bait I was using. You can also use a timer on your phone, but the more it comes out of your pocket, the more likely it is to find the water.

Well I know one thing if I hear dinging coming from your area the fish aren't by you, lol. I too seem to have bait remorse after tourney's. Thinking "Dang I should tried that jig or plastic yesterday". Your timer would work for moving to a new hole also.

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monstermoose78

This is great stuff Thanks Lawrence!!

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Gridlocked

Another important tip for newbies: It seems a little bit silly, but I've seen it happen in ice leagues as well as open-water leagues. Keep ALL of your fish that are over the minimum length until it's time to cull. We've had a few teams frustrated with themselves because they were short a fish or two and a few that went back would have ended up making a difference in the standings.

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MN BassFisher

Another important tip for newbies: It seems a little bit silly, but I've seen it happen in ice leagues as well as open-water leagues. Keep ALL of your fish that are over the minimum length until it's time to cull. We've had a few teams frustrated with themselves because they were short a fish or two and a few that went back would have ended up making a difference in the standings.

This is a good tip. I've seen this come into play during summer bass tourneys/leagues.

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clayton08

One of my favorite buckets to haul fish in is the tidy cats bucket. My dad has cats and keeps them for me needless to say I have zero right now as they always get stole. Dress warm and dont forget food cause by the time 11 rolls around you usually need something to keep going hard. This is my second year in UPL and it was fun. The amount of information in this group is awesome. The biggest thing I learned last year was dont forget your bucket and make sure you have 2 augers with. Lots of things go wrong when your out there and its sometimes tough to catch fish when its -20 below.

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Kyle From

What is the minnimum length set at?

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Lawrence Luoma

7 inch gills and 8 inch crappies

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MN BassFisher

Can anyone comment on the Brands or Quality of the Digital Scales (that weigh in grams) that are typically used by UPL member? It appears that there is a wide range of prices ($20-$160) and I'd imagine the price reflects quality.

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Lawrence Luoma

Taylor Digital scale ($26) at Target is the one to get. I'm trying out the rapala tournament scales. Problem is those tournament scales don't work well when cold so I'm try the new smaller one that will fit inside my Jacket.

For the Taylor scales keep some extra batteries in pocket till weigh time if real cold.

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