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Sheephead Slayer

Ice out date?

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largemarge

Just drove from Rutgers on Bay Lake to the cities...Vineland bay has ice that is very chunky from shore to a few hundred yards out. That is the only bay on the west side that has ice. wind has been from the east for several days so any ice should be on the west side. pretty close to being out!!

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Stick in Mud

Yep, and the big west wind today will move everything back east, though I doubt there'll be much left by tomorrow.

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CaptainMusky

ICEBERG RIGHT AHEAD!

Head's up in the morning (or at midnight) for you boys and gals going there. Might be some issues.

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fishnpole

Just wanted to post that ice-out was declared by the Mille Lacs Messenger on the morning of the 7th. As the Captain pointed out, there is still some sizeable ice chunks floating around. More dangerous, yet, are some sizeable blocks of wood from the fish houses that were never retrieved when houses were pulled.

I just came off the lake and with 15-25 mph winds from the west and rain, it's cold. The water temp is currently 44.5 degrees. The wind should be dropping after midnight, but if you're going out, make sure to dress warm and bring gloves. You'll be happy you did. The walleyes are in shallow (2 feet) and spawning right now. I marked alot of spawned fish out between 18-22 feet. Those will be much more catchable.

Good luck all...

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RumRiverRat

How do you know the deep fish were walleyes and were spawned out?

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fishnpole

Good catch, triple R, they may have been PRE-Spawn females, amonst the post-spawners.

Lake-spawning walleye typically gather early at a place of sufficient depth and then dart into the shallow water to deposit their eggs [source: Webb].

Female walleye spend most of their time in deep waters -- where there is greater cover and food availability -- and appear just before the nocturnal spawn. Even then, they'll retreat to deeper water in the daytime. When their efforts are complete, they return to deep water to rest [sources: Shining Falls Lodge, Webb].

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