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wannafish2

Scent killer spray

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wannafish2

Has anyone ever noticed that on a lot of hunting shows they spray scent killer on their Scent Blocker clothes? Why do they do that? Isn't the clothing supposed to already be killing odors? WTH?

I've spent tons of money on Scent Blocker clothes. I better not have to spray them as well.

Can anyone enlighten me?

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Hoyt4

Scent blocker is not 100% and any other help is worth it.Some sprays just do not work some do better same as scent blocker clothes. You still have to hunt smart and play the winds to your advantage. Plus in the shows they are also selling a product so they have to show it.

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1eyeReD

I do it to get rid of (well, more like do my best to tone down) the scent my outer garments may have picked up between the dryer and heading to the woods after putting them on. I typically wash all under and outer garments in scent eliminating detergents and fold them up into a small plastic bin that I take with in the truck. But lots o good greasy aromatic food is cooked in my house so I just can't let myself put all trust in this plastic bin...

And here are some other examples of possibilities:

1) You get to your spot and suit up, but for some reason had to sit in the driver seat for a few seconds. Now your butt smells like the fresh scent dispensed by the new doohickie your wife attached to your air vents.

2) You get to your spot and suit up, but may have forgot to wipe your hands before doing so and your clothes now have a lil bit of potato chip grease on the parts of the garments that you touched with your hands.

3) You are about to step into the woods and realize you were suiting up while standing by the tail pipe of your running truck for about 5 minutes :P

Scent control clothing is designed to control your human scent and I think mostly from the inside out. So the spray is to help on the outside. It helps to shower in scent control stuff too before going to the field and avoiding yummy aromatic foods, cigarette smoke etc. prior to the hunt. Have had nice deer down wind of me within 20 yds that were clueless... Yes, I still missed.

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Bear55

It's basic math, if you have one company paying you to wear the clothes and another company paying you to spray the clothes you can make more money that way. wink

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harvey lee

I spray almost eveything down including my bow with Dead Down Wind. Does it help, I do not know as I have no real way to test the deer's nose versus my scent.

I figure it surely cannot hurt for the little it costs.

I have scent lock clothes but do not always were it as some days are warmer and I would be a bit warm as I have heavier scent lock clothes.

I do play the wind every time out and try to get very high to help. I do not see the hurt in usinf it for thoise deer who may circle downwind of me.

I am sure alot of the shows use it for marketing purposes.

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rkhinrichs

Kind of on the same topic. Do you use your left over spray from last year or do you. Just by new stuff??

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eyeslayer20

I've always heard one should not spray Scent Killer on their scent lok, or carbon suits is that a myth also???

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paceman

Kind of on the same topic. Do you use your left over spray from last year or do you. Just by new stuff??

I have had the same bottles for about 3 years......

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SmellEsox

I just save my money and hunt downwind. I've been busted after spraying and busted w/o spraying. I've also found that I hate to spray liquid on myself when its 25 degrees in the morning. I personally think its all a waste of money. But if it gives you more confidence, go for it.

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leechlake

another reason to spray it on is because plenty of studies have been done proving carbon suits can not be "recharged" by putting them in a hot dryer.

It's been a few years but I passed on one of these scientific studies here a few years ago. Basically, to recharge the carbon in a suit the temperature needed would start the suit on fire. The carbon does absorb odors but once it's absorbed the odors and has no absorption left your suit is now useless for it's purported purpose. I'd guess between mfg and sitting in the store a lot of the useful absorption is done.

I still have one of these suits and used it for a while, I don't know where it is. Probably the best thing about these suits is that they can give you confidence and that keeps you in the field longer which ups your odds. Spraying whatever on also helps your confidence and I do use these products and they do seem to cut odors, the effectiveness is only to be judged by the deer since us humans are bad smellers in comparison.

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TruthWalleyes

I don't worry about my scent. I hunt the wind. I smoke cigs in the field. I also spray on some scent killer about 10% of the time, that would be either when i remember or when it's not frozen in the bottle.

I've often thought about trying to go scent free, but it seems impossible to completely control your scent. 1eyeRed brought a lot of examples.

I've never fallen for scent proof clothing. I light up a cig and pull the trigger.

I'm also not a trophy hunter, so not too worried about seeing big horns...Just a few opportunities at a mature deer suffice, doe or buck.

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harvey lee

Yes, I use to smoke when I archery hunted and shot lots of does. I didn't think it mattered as I always used the wind. I also wondered why the other guys I hunt with saw and shot more bucks and also saw more deer totally and they do not smoke.

I quit smoking and last fall, I shot 2 of the nicest bucks I have for years with my bow.

I would never smoke in a deer stand again. I really do not care about the bucks and horns as I hunt mainly for enjoyment and meat.

With that said, cigs do chase some deer away at least from what I have seen in the past 2 years.

With my rifle I do not believe smoke is a huge concern as I can shoot deer at a much longer distance but with my boiw, it does make a difference.

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1eyeReD

Yea no matter what, it's nearly impossible to eliminate your scent completely. There will always be some kind of scent.. Your breath, for example. I for one, know that in the mornings, my breath kicks more than a Bruce Lee flick. I've recently started using a scent control toothpaste!

As for scent control clothing, carbon does lose effectiveness over time. However, I believe it does work in helping you shield in some of that natural bodily scent that can come from things like perspiration or some other smells that can be as a result of the delicious tacos with extra cheese and sour cream you had during lunch before climbing into an evening stand. I dunno, maybe it's just me but I believe doing everything you possibly can to stay as undetected as possible will help. And I truly believe it may increase your odds. Having that deer give you 3 more seconds before he finally decides that faint smell doesn't smell right can make a difference.. I'd take that over having my deer immediately spook by a stronger scent as he is about to enter my lane.

And speaking of scent control clothing, it is overpriced - yes. It is ridiculous. But does it work? Yes it does.

When I first bought my Scentlok pants and jacket, I tested by taking a fresh scent plugin and just putting it on the ground and covering it with the unzipped parka (scent liner against the plugin and the suade camo on the outside of course). It must've looked weird to family members in the house but when I was on all fours trying to smell the plugin through my jacket, but I confirmed I couldn't smell it. Without the jacket over it, you could smell the "lavender spring" pretty easily.

As for the body wash, it works too. I don't get paid by Dead Down Wind but I use their body shampoo before going hunting. I've used other brands like Scent Away and they all really do make you smell like nothing. Though it will probably only work until you contaminate your "nothing" smell, it's better than smelling like the regular hygiene products. My wife says sometimes when I come back I still smell like nothing... But again, I'll only smell like nothing til I scarf down a few cheeseburgers in a car filled with bags of fast food, but even she thinks it's kind of nice when I use it so that says a lot LOL!!

Bottom line is - the products do actually do what they say. Just gotta use as directed. Yes, use the spray. And as others have said above, even on your gear and boots.. Between the truck and the stand. Use the hell out of that spray. Even after all of that, you're not going to completely eliminate your scent. But I bet you just brought down your scent levels which is better than not doing so.

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SmellEsox

Just curious, if you pass gas, can you smell it when you wear your suit?

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leechlake

scent lok diaper covers for babies, if it worked they'd be out there.

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Bear55

Scent killer nook to cut down on the scent you breath. laugh

CMO_medium.jpeg

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eyeguy 54

lol

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1eyeReD

Just curious, if you pass gas, can you smell it when you wear your suit?

I'd imagine you would. It'll escape somehow. Kinda like when you pass gas in a pair of chest waders. It escapes right under your nose and comes in strong waves with movement.

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SmellEsox

Oooooh. Not pleasant! LOL

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FISHINGURU

There is no way to tell forsure, you can get busted with or without sprays, smoking or not smoking, wearing or not wearing scent free clothing.

Me personally, I'll take all the steps I can to try and be as scent free as possible. I go for the big boys though they are a little bit smarter then your average buck or doe. Although the mature does are just as smart, maybe even smarter because they only think with 1 head.

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psepuncher

how about that new spray called nose jammer, er something like that?

It has vanillin in it, as does the trees and cigarrette smoke.

btw this video shows how to use it with a carbon suit.....lol.

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Swiftswamper

I personally do not smoke while bow hunting anymore. When slug hunting comes i smoke like crazy in stand

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rkhinrichs

spent 71 bucks. on scent killer stuff at the new Dick's in duluth! will it help me to kill a deer?? maybe. does it up my odds! IDK. Will i still play the wind. Yes! either way im ready! less than a week! till the games begin!

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psepuncher

sure hope there's some cooler temps next weekend.

if not, I'll leave most of the gear at home and just dawn the silver lined base layer, some DDW and a thermacell.

Also studies show that the scent lok traps up to 99% human oder, and reactivation is only needed a couple times a season, which sounds pretty good. It only needs 40-60 mins in the dryer on high heat, which at the normal temps it breaks the oder bonding to the fabric and then disipates through the process. I'm sure if it didn't work they'd be OIB along time ago.

When I buy carbon stuff , first thing I do is wash it in the carbon wash dtergent since it's been sitting out in the store.

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deerminator

I use the scent killer spray but more for other uses, like spraying down my buck decoy before I settle into my ground blind. I also spray down the blind the first time I place it somewhere and the trail cameras. And my boots before walking in to a spot.

That said, I'm nearly fooled into buying some of that carbon synergy for a new ghillie suit I bought for this year. The manufacturer and hunting personality plugging the suit recommend dipping it in a bath of the stuff periodically and then hanging it up to dry. Anyone ever use this stuff?

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