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THANK YOU DNR!!!


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I had to thank a dnr Officer this afternoon for not allowing a boat to enter the water after it was checked & found to have zebra mussels on it. We were coming off of Big Trout & the other boat was about to launch.

It may be a pain in the butt to get checked but I am glad they are doing there job & stopping these "CIDIOTS" from infesting our waters.

Thanks Again if you are the DNR Officer who stopped them!!!

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stopping these "CIDIOTS" from infesting our waters.

Don't be that guy. They're not YOUR waters. They're a public resource. Agreed though, glad they stopped the boat before the zebs got in.

Just curious, how do you know they were cidiots? or are you implying people outside of the metro don't transport AIS, it's just idiots from the cities? Kind of a Richard thing to say.

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Maybe the exotics that are spread by "cidiots" do more damage than the ones spread by locals crazy

Yep, I was with you 100% on your post until I read that bonehead comment.

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The DNR asked them where they usually boat at & their answer was Minnetonka. I was right next to them loading my boat while DNR was filling out the paper work.

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Question: How long can zebra mussels stay alive out of water? The reason I ask, just changed the impeller on my motor and found snail shells that were way to big to fit through the inlet ports. They were all dryed up but? I do not keep boat in water overnight, and do fish almost every day. I also power wash the boat every week just to keep it clean. But how can you stop things from getting to inlet ports and hidding?

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I was told by the girl that sits at the access on Northlong 48 hours out of water & you should be safe.

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So what to do when the boat is from lake to lake day to day. The intake ports and the cavity behind can hide a lot

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WalleyeJeff- I myself won't put my boat in a lake if it has already been tagged as infested waters.

To SalmonSlayer & anybody else I may have offended by calling them "Cidiots" I apologize...guess I should have used Jackwagons instead!

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Nice, from what I see on the lake we pay outragous taxes, for the schools and roads and water, etc. is that the locals do tons more lake hopping than the people with homes and cabins on the lake, I'm sure they're more diligent about checking their boats so thats all good.

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Unfortunately the mussels have been found in Michigan Lakes that have no human access. They can be introduced to a water system by waterfowl and it is believed that is a common occurance. In Michigan the increased water clarity has changed the fisher greatly. Most walleye fisherman now night fish, baits with treble hooks are fowled with mussles once they bump bottom, weed growth may increase but in some lakes it has not, etc. In genaral it is major change but in my experience to this point, about 15 years of mussels, life goes on and the lakes and fishery have survived. Best to all! see you in Sept.

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Salmonslayer-how do you know his name is Richard? And know where do I see in centrals posting is he implying he owns the lake.

They got in the lakes around here some how right? It wasn't the locals that put them there. Look how many lakes are infected in the metro compared to around here...just sayin'

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Thanks to the dnr.

Thanks for waiting for so stinking long before implementing these road stops, access patrols. These invasives have been here for how long? fifteen or more years and they finally are getting stronger with the regulations.

Yep thanks!!!

oh yeah keep beating eachother up for whos the one whos hauling around the lil buggers. Just blame me, after all Im from wiconsin, that other nasty country that loves to rape and pillage laugh

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Well you are cheesehead & probably a Arron Rogers fan too!

Oh wait that was a "Richard" thing to say.

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I suppose the DNR will want me to open my bilge pump and livewell pumps now to hey!

the opportunity to battle exotics was over years ago, and still they allow ships to dump their ballast water into superior, but we are the targets now. ( new revenue stream).

I am going to carry a small squirt bottle of chlorox now and treat the residual water left that is impossible to get. it only takes about 2-3 drops in a gallon of water and all is dead. There is no way to flush pump and hose systems in boats at accesses.

tiny little buggers can hide all over the place and be into to next lake in minutes.

What number do we call to report zealous weed nazi's and what is this radom check on the highway stuff? after we leave the access all should be good to go right? I understand if you have stuff hanging on your boat and trailer that you could be stopped or if the drain plug is in ok I get it but don;t stop me without reasonable cause.

Will this go the way of the ice shack walk in law as well? the future looks odd.

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Just remember these "citiots" are probably helping you and most others you know make a living here and also be able to live here. It's a tourist area, if you can't live with vacationers/cabin owners coming and using what the area has to offer maybe you should consider moving?

YES thanks to the DNR for stopping a boater from launching. Unfortunently, I feel it's going to happen its just a matter of time.

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People get so hung up about people calling the lake mine or our's and feel the need to remind everyone they are a public resource. And they are. No one owns them. But can you blame a guy who lives on the lake and/or in the community surrounding it for taking pride of hypothetical ownership? As in, it's my hometown or my team. They don't either but they like to say my or our in reference to them.

I do, BTW, live on a popular lake in south central Minnesota and consider it my lake. I also consider it my neighbor's lake and everyone in the community, state and country's lake. I love to see people at the boat landings from out of town on vacation and enjoy talking to them and giving them tips on fishing. Sometimes there are 30 plus boats on the lake tubing. It's fun. I like it. I don't get grumpy about too many people because it's open to everyone. But I can see how people get concerned about invasive species and am happy to see volunteers doing checks at landings. I don't ever think anyone or a lake association should be allowed to close a public landing, however.

As for "Cidiots," well that's an unwarranted stereotype. I don't live in the Cities but I'm an outsider up there. Yet I spend thousands of dollars each year in the Crosslake and Pequot Lakes area at the resort we go to, restaurants, gas stations, bait shops, liquour stores : ), grocery stores and so on. And my wife shops all over the place. : P My in-laws come with us, stay in another cabin and do the same. Sometimes we are up there multiple times a year. Yes, we have our own place on the lake but love the Whitefish Chain. I went there for 12 Summers as a kid with my family. And now my family has for the past 8. Anyway, my point is, we've always followed all the rules and laws in the community and on the lake and always been treated great. I hope that no one ever looks down upon us because we're not local.

In fact. I may have to get a t-shirt like this for next year... : )

full-25796-22648-hassle.jpg

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Well said Deerminator. I'm in for one of those shirts to, then we could go sailing.......

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Zebra Mussels and other invasive species are a fact of life, so we might as well just get used to it. Life WILL find a way, and WILL NOT be stopped by human beings.

In the meantime, all our efforts to stop the spread is only making life miserable for anglers and boaters, and at best is only marginally curbing the spread.

Personally, I'd rather have LESS things that make me a potential criminal and regulation-violator, not more. They could outlaw all boats on all lakes, and invasive species will STILL be a fact of life that we cannot stop.

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It'll all about some people feeling they have the right, nay, obligation to tell everyone else how they should live their life so they can feel better about themselves and feel they have an impact on the world. In typical fashion the "Hall Monitors" of the world have ruined it for everyone else. Thanks!

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I'm not even saying invasive species aren't a problem riverratpete. They are.

I'm just saying that people who are making life miserable for those who use the water are trying to accomplish something that can never be accomplished.

It may be that they do so out of a kneejerk need to control other people. But I find it more likely that there is a breed of people who see a problem and think that money and resources and effort must be spent to solve it, without asking themselves the crucial question: can the problem BE solved?

In this case, as in so many other instances of bureaucratic overreach and burdensome regulation, they are making life miserable trying to solve a problem that cannot be solved. They fail to look at the cost/benefit balance sheet and arrive at a logical conclusion..

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Often people become desensitized to things like milfoil/zebs after it has taken over, and become lax in preventing spread. Things like rusty crayfish are statewide out east, regs to prevent spread are dropped, (ex. Indiana) so out of state anglers think nothing of using them for bait here in Minnesota, thus spreading them. The Twin Cities Metro area has a very high number of lakes infested with AIS , and alot of people using infested lakes regularly, then taking off for up north to the "extended metro areas" such as Brainerd may have a more "so what" attitude. My sister in law from the suburbs of Minneapolis said when she first saw the lake here in Grand Rapids "WOW, you can see the bottom of the lake!" You don't know what you was lost, if you never had it. She grew up with dirty green lakes.

NOTE 1: "Extended metro area" includes formerly outstate areas such as Alexandria and Brainerd, at least according to some of the meteorologists on TV in the "cities". I have no doubt that it will soon include East Grand Forks, Bemidji, Grand Rapids and Duluth. All of us out here enjoy being "suburbanized". cry

NOTE 2: Maybe Zebs should be in more metro lakes so a whole new generation who never saw the bottom of the local lake will be able to do so. whistle Zebs are one of the AIS that are not yet widespread in metro county lakes.

Lakevet

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I maybe wrong but don't zebras eat the samething minnows do?

Hmmmmmmm

wonder how that will end?

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I believe this is called "Evolution".

Life/things change and have done so for millions of years.

Why fight it by wasting money, time, and resourses that could be used elsewhere?

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I believe this is called "Evolution".

Life/things change and have done so for millions of years.

Why fight it by wasting money, time, and resourses that could be used elsewhere?

I don't know if I'd call it "evolution" specifically. But I certainly understand and agree with your point.

The earth and its species and habitats are on a constantly fluid and dynamic course. Nothing - nothing - ever stays the same. The only sure constant is the state of change. Some things change more quickly or slowly than others, but the one thing we can always count on is that A) the earth will not be the same in the future as it has been in the past, and B) we are not in control of how, why, or when those changes will take place.

Trying to stop Zebra Mussels or Milfoil is an exercise in futility, an unnecessary aggravation, and a waste of resources.

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I believe this is called "Evolution".

Life/things change and have done so for millions of years.

Why fight it by wasting money, time, and resourses that could be used elsewhere?

I guess I would call it more "Adaptation". But, I would love it if Zebra's evolved into Walleyes! wink
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mankind stopped the "evolution" of the sealamprey quite well in the great lakes. we may not be able to fully stop AIS but there is hope we can control them through following the regs and further study in the species. we are not the only state that is concerned with this. good luck.

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Only if they where bigger, New Zealand Green Mussels in a garlic and butter sauce. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

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Natural selection and the Pacific as well as the Atlantic oceans were no match for the procrastination of the bodies charged with protecting our waters.

The major function of government is to protect us and all in our borders, the agencys that could have prevented this decades ago fell on there faces time and time again and still nothing has been done to protect the great lakes. The dept of the Interior, and agriculture and most of the govenment aquatic biologists are to blame for the not sounding the alarm bell and then stopping the spread.

Your tax dollars and government science hard at work again!

Asian carp to Zebra mussels. that about covers it.

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Governments can't prevent these invaders and can rarely erradicate them. The best we can do is mitigate their damage when possible "if" there is a clear economic impact. Government doesn't control mother nature.

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Mother nature didn't bring them here, thats my point.

Government is the only body with the authority to do anything at all, and they failed.

They stood by for decades and now we have the mess we have.

Could a private citizen force ships to kill the balast water on board? or tell them to turn around and not allow them into port untill they were compliant?

Mother nature failed to invade our waters for thousands of years, fifty years ago none of this was here. TV spots don't stop invaders people in the field do.

I wonder which group will be the first to file a class action suit agiant the State or feds.

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