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LC Smith Shotgun


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I inherited a LC Smith side by side 12 ga from my grandfather who passed . I did find a website to search serial numbers (9632 for mine) but I was wondering what the markings below the serial # are on the barrel (0 E).

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I would guess the grade as well. Maybe some kind of designation of the kind of steel used as well. Sorry to hear that your Grandfather passed, make sure you take that shotgun out once or twice every fall, he wants it used, not stored in the safe

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If memory serves me, the "O" likely designates the grade, and the "E" may indicate automatic ejectors. This was an upgrade over the standard extractors that were usually supplied. I have a good reference on those guns and can try to dig-up more info tomorrow if you'd like. www.lcmith.org is the address for the L.C. Smith Collectors Association. They have a ton of information.

L.C. Smiths were among the best American-made shotguns. Those that are still in decent condition tend to be really good shooters even after so many years. Among the early years of manufacture, many had damascus barrels, and most experts tell you that they should not be fired. There are at least 4 Smiths in my family, and they all still shoot where ya point 'em!

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Cool...thanks for the info! If you are willing to dig a little deeper that would be awesome!

I made a gun rack for it and it is hanging on the wall, I think I intend to keep it there. It has a small crack in the stock on one side basically in the grip. Im thinking about taking it to a gunsmith to see if there is anything they can do to clean it up a little. I am going to pass it on to my kids when they are older.

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Most Smiths have a cracked stock so nothing unusual there. Don't clean it up too much and don't even think about refinishing the stock. Years of honest use add character. Enjoy it for what it is, a family heirloom.

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I would ask the gun smith if it is still shootable. I think you should hunt with it once a year, even with light target loads for rabbits. Honor your grand father and use it.

I have a shotgun in my safe that belonged to my brother in law before he was killed 10 years ago. I clean it every year and use it for at least one pheasant hunt a year. I would rather carry my o/u instead of that beastly 3.5" browing gold hunter, but it needs to be hunted with before I pass it on to his daughter (my niece) or his grand children. I doubt my niece will ever hunt so it will stay in my possesion until her kids (she is 11 now) start hunting

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Do not touch the stock or clean anything without an experts opinion. My Smith was a 16 GA. I had it appraised at $3500 in 1985 it was very well used. Unfortunatly all my guns were stolen in 86. It is the only gun I miss. Have yours checked out.

Mwal

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I dont really plan on shooting it. I just want to keep it in the family. If the gunsmith gives it the ok, I might shoot it occasionally...and tell whoever is with me about the time that Grandma pulled both triggers and wound up on her keester!

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I agree, on some level, with what everyone else has had to say. A gunsmith probably can "clean it up a little", but you'll want to have a very open, honest discussion with the smith about what can be done, and more importantly, what you actually WANT done. A gunsmiths recommendation on shootability is a good idea if you want to shoot it. For sure.

A lot of old Smiths do have cracked wood, often wrists/grips. Smiths were great guns, but their field guns were affordable enough that they often saw very hard use. Assuming we are correct about "O" designating grade, it would have been one of their lower grades. L.C. Smith had about 4 different periods (ownerships), and O grades were analogous to Field grades. Today, an O or Field grade in 12 gauge is rarely sold for more than a grand (I know there are some exceptions), but usually sellers in the know won't let them go for under 500. Other grades (Ideal, Pigeon, Olympic, Crown, Monogram to name a few) certainly fetch MUCH higher prices. I know your interest here is sentimental, not monetary, but if the info makes you better able to make decisions regarding any potential work to be done, then awesome. I think your plans to hang onto it, maybe clean it up a little, possibly shoot it a bit if OK'd, and pass it on to family are perfect. I will do a bit of digging for info for you.

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And, I just realized that I mis-typed the address for the Collectors Association. As anyone who has tried it probably figured out, it should be www.lcsmith.org

I apologize for the screw-up!

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