• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • WE CREATE LONG TERM, MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIPS IN HERE ... PLEASE JOIN US.

    You know what we all love...

    RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE
    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
Phred52

Why "Trailer Tires"???

Question

Phred52

For the tire pros. What precisely is the reason to replace trailer tires WITH "Trailer Tires"? Is a trailer tire any better (or worse) than a regular car or light truck tire or is this just a ploy to price these tires higher? If the trailer tire is a lower quality tire than a car tire, WHY would I pay more and put it on a trailer that I'll be pulling down the highway with cargo. Conversely, If "Trailer tires" are a higher quality tire, then what are we putting on our passenger vehicles? "Sidewalls", you say??? If my truck can hug a curve @ 60mph on the highway with LT (6,8 or 10 ply)tires, Then a trailer being towed by the same truck should be able to do the same with a 'P'or 'LT' rated tire, Sidewall is still gonna flex. If somebody has a logical answer, I'd sure appreciate it. Phred52

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0
norma

Passenger (P) and light truck(LT) are DOT certified to carry people. Trailer tires are not, conversly, trailer tires are certified to carry much more weight at higher inflation pressures than similarly sized P or LT tires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
LightningBG

Here is the best explanation I found. Truck Tires are OK. Car tires aren't.

Special Trailer Tires Vs Passenger Tires

There are distinct differences in the way passenger tires and trailer tires are

designed, engineered, and constructed. There are also differences in the service

requirements between the tires on your car or truck and those on your trailer.

Traction, or grip, is a key element in the design of passenger tires. Traction

moves your car or truck down the road. Traction allows you to stop, turn and

swerve, and traction also gives you the ability to tow your trailer. Another

important consideration in passenger tire design is “ride”. Ride, traction, and

handling are all achieved in passenger tire designs by adding flex in the sidewall.

By making the sidewall more flexible, tire engineers maximize tread contact with

the road, thus increasing traction and allowing the driver to maintain better

control over the vehicle.

Traction is only a factor on trailers equipped with brakes, during braking

operations, because trailers are followers. In fact, sidewall flexing in a trailer

application is a negative. Sidewall flexing on trailers carrying heavy loads;

trailers with high vertical side loads (enclosed/travel trailers); or trailers with light

tongue weights, is a primary cause of trailer sway. Automotive radial tires with

their flexible sidewalls notably accentuate trailer sway problems. The stiffer

sidewalls and higher operating pressures common with Special Trailer (ST) tires

helps control and reduce the occurrence of trailer sway. Bottom line, trailers are

more stable and pull better on tires designed specifically for trailer use.

Also consider that all Light Truck (LT) and Special Trailer (ST) tires are fully rated

for trailer applications. This means the tires can carry their full sidewall weight

rating when used on a trailer. When passenger tires are used on a trailer, the

load capacity of tire must be de-rated by 10%. If the tire has a maximum load

rating of 1900 lb., it may only be used in a trailer application up to 1710 lb. This

means the GAWR rating on the trailer Certification Label must not exceed 3420

lbs. On a single axle trailer, or 2 times 1710 lbs.

For trailer use, it is important to match the tires to the application and payload.

Since Special Trailer (ST) tires are constructed with more and heavier materials,

they are tougher and more bruise resistant than typical passenger tires. This is a

plus because trailer suspension systems are generally stiffer and less

sophisticated than automotive suspension systems. A tire designed to operate in

the more demanding trailer environment will provide end users a longer service

life and withstand the added abuse tires on a trailer experience.

Bias ply Special Trailer tire technology has been moving trailers around America

for nearly 30 years, and more recently, the ST Radial arrived on the scene

providing the same durability and dependability in a radial trailer tire. For many

trailer buyers, tire decisions are purely price based. The allure of an equal price

and the word “radial” for that price draws some customers to the passenger tire.

Taskmaster hopes this explanation of the differences will help you make a more

informed decision on your next trailer tire purchase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
traveler

great info...I wouldn't have guessed there was that much to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Phred52

Thank-You, Those explainations make sense. Phred52

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Announcements



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Wanderer
      Fence and pressure from the neighborhood is your best best until there is a law against it. Good luck.
    • delcecchi
      My deck?
    • PRO-V
      A letter from all the neighbors or a neighborhood meeting with him sounds like a good first thing to try. Maybe he'll get the hint. Better than war.
    • james_walleye
      Got a good tree for a stand? Haha
    • CigarGuy
      Rig up a motion sensor with a horn or alarm of some kind.
    • delcecchi
      New neighbor decided he likes to feed deer in the winter, and he does so right on our side of his yard.   The food attracts many many deer, and so our yard now has a big mudhole as well as bushels of deer pellets.    (free for the raking).    Nobody on the road is very happy about him feeding the deer since they tramp around the area and stand on the road and so on.    He didn't sound like "oops won't do that anymore" but more like "no big deal, it will wash away and the grass will grow back"    Anybody got any suggestions?   CO says "nothing that he can do", Town board isn't happy either but isn't convinced they can do anything.   I'm thinking that if they pass a rule, then I can take him to small claims court every spring until he stops wrecking our lawn.   Molotov cocktails are a last resort.   I am thinking of a fence that I put up in the fall to funnel the deer away from my yard.   Snowfence is too short but might help discourage them....   I really don't want war with the neighbor but this can't go on.    I'll talk to him again and see what he is thinking....   Maybe a letter from all his neighbors...   I need ideas...
    • hamboneco
      My buddy and I are hoping to make it in to Little Trout Lake the week after next.   Sitting a canoe has become a little less comfortable over the years, so our idea is to row/pole our way through the channel from Trout Lake in our 16' boat, then row around and drift in Little Trout, while catching some nice walleyes.   Hoping we can get through whatever remains of the beaver dam in the channel without getting in the water.    If anyone has been in to Little Trout lately, does this seem doable?    Poling through the channel always worked years ago when motors were allowed on Little Trout, but of course, things can change in 40+ years.   The only bummer is that I was hoping we could leave the motor on the boat and just not fire it up on Little, but the Ranger Station in Cook told me I must remove it and stash it on the Trout Lake side.  Also, although I spent quite a bit of time on Little Trout in the late 50's through the early 70's, I've only been in there a couple times since.  If anyone has any advice on fishing locations, I would gladly accept them.   
    • Better Than Working!
      Thanks! I have to admit that the plan starting the day was to pitch for smallmouth but the wind where we wanted to fish pushed us to plan B! Another reason to tell my wife why I need so many rods and reels and tackle boxes!
    • Tom Sawyer
      Nice fish!
    • Better Than Working!
      Not seeing any reports from Mille Lacs so here is my 1st report! Hit the pond Saturday afternoon for a few hours of getting the rust off the boat, equipment and skills. Found the fish in cabbage in 10-12 feet of water. Trolling stick baits 2.0 - 2.3 mph. Only got 4 walleye (24", 25" and two 28") but they were very healthy! Not bad for a few hours of fishing! Good luck out there and make some memories!