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mn_archer

How to remove a conibear from your dog

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mn_archer

With the recent issues with conibears I said I would make a post with pictures on how to remove a conibear from your pet. This would cover anything that was in the conibear, but you'll have more time with a dog than say a cat.

I have never heard of an accidental dog catch where the owner was close by where they wouldn't have had time to get the trap off before the dog expired.

Please keep this civil so it doesn't get yanked, but feel free to ask any questions you'd like. I am no expert, but I have been trapping since I was about 5 years old.

First of all, here are the 2 conibears you are most likely to run into on dry land that would be capeable or large enough for a dog to get it's heard into. The larger one is a 220 and the smaller one is a 160. 220's are 7 x 7" and the 160's are 6" square.

DSC03798.jpg

here is what a 220 looks like when it is set

DSC03784.jpg

and here is what it looks like sprung...

DSC03787.jpg

here the springs are compressed and you'll notice the safety hooks are latched. this is the position you would need to get it to to remove it from your dog.

DSC03786.jpg

here is what you don't want to see. The actress is Abby, my 1 1\2 year old yellow lab that is 57 lbs. She would never be able to get this far into a conibear without my help. A dog this size would only be able to get one jaw behind it's ears, but that is just as lethal as two.

DSC03797.jpg

Before you ar people come over to take my dog away, it is not spring on her head.

What ever you do, do not try to force the trap off or try to pry the jaws open. it ain't gonna happen and you will be wasting valuable time. The only thing I would try to do and that is only if the dog is obviously choking and thrashing would be to try to rodate the trap on the dogs head so the jaws are compressed against the sides of the neck, not over the throat. it would look something like this.

DSC03796.jpg

ok, to set a trap, you need to get each spring compressed and the safety hook latched INDIVIDUALLY. You can not do them both at the same time. You aren't strong enough and again, it is a waste of time.

If you are worried about your ability to do this by hand there are a couple o[ptions for the bird hunter. There are several quality conibear setters out there and this would be the fastest way to get it done, but the down side is that they are bulky and a littl on the heavy side. In my opinion there is a better way for the bird hunter and it is almost free and very light. And in reality, something that takes a little longer will work much better than the heavy, bulky setters that you left in the truck cause you were only going out for 30 minutes.

Take a piece of 1/4" rope about 5' long and put a loop in one end. That is it, you have a very light coni setter that will fit into any pocket. It should look something like this...

DSC03788.jpg

Here is how to use it.

The loop is for your foot to go into it so make sure it is large enough to slip your boot in.

The springs of the conibear will be connected to the jaws with something called spring eyes. Run the rope through the spring eyes almost up to the loop for your foot-

DSC03789.jpg

bring the rope back over the spring...

DSC03790.jpg

then run it back through the spring eye exactly the same way as the first time.

Then stick your boot in the loop and stand on it while pulling on the loose end of the rope--

DSC03791.jpg

pull the rope till it compresses the spring almost all the way then slide the safety hook towards the jaws till it goes over the spring. Remove your rope and run it through the other spring exactly the same way. Once you have one spring compressed and the safety hook latched your dog will get some relief, but it is not out of trouble yet. You need to get both springs comressed.

continued.......

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mn_archer

DSC03793.jpg

DSC03794.jpg

Once you have the rope on the second spring you are about 2 seconds from saving your dog. Tighten the rope so the spring is compressed, slide the safety hook on then get the trap off.

This is a lot easier and faster to do then it is to tell you how to do it. The next time you are in a fleet farm go to the sporting goods section and look at a conibear. They carry Duke 160's and you will get the picture of what I am saying as soon as you have one in your hands.

If you are anywhere close to me I'd be more than willing to meet you some place and I'll bring several conibears with for you to see and set to get familiar with.

I am located in the Brainerd lakes area.

Thanks for looking-

Michael

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picksbigwagon

that is a great informational post Michael, thank you!

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stretcher

Great post Michael maybe I'll run into you at the winter meeting if you're going. I would love to talk to you about cat trapping.

Chad

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Dave S

Great tip about the rope. Much lighter to carry and cheaper to purchase than a setter.

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mn_archer

Chad, I will be at the Winter meeting. See you there. Most of the people there know who I am so you should be ble to find me.

michael

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Flying_Fort

This thread should be placed at the top of the forum permanently. I am not sure how that gets done. Thanks for the info. I have always just used a setters to set mine. A very good back up to have.

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DTro

Very cool to take the time to do this! I know I learned something today.

Chalk up a Karma point to mn_archer.

The dog looks like it knew how to play the part too. You should take your show on the road laugh

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LovenLifeGuy

Thanks for the great info. Where would one of these be placed and do the trappers have to mark it? Also, if you are on public land do they have to post anything saying that a trap is on the property? Just curious!

Thanks again!

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Harmonica Bear

YEs - Thanks for the info! Good stuff!

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Rick

Thank you sir.

Much appreciated that you took the time to do this.

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brittman

If you go and search internet sales and AUCTION sites ... you will see at least three different types of conibear trap setting tools for sale.

The scissors (tongs) type (Duke or Sleepy Creek Model #4 trap setter)

a caulk gun (Robbie) type

foot activated (GEM Setter) type

use of each style can be found on youtube.

The GEM setter type looks managable in a vest and easy to use. Anyone have experience with this type?

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Fins-n-feathers

Thank you for taking the time to do this, I just hope I wont have to use this imformation! wink

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psegriz

Thanks for the great info. Where would one of these be placed and do the trappers have to mark it? Also, if you are on public land do they have to post anything saying that a trap is on the property? Just curious!

Thanks again!

No not any markings or postings.

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duckster

I am not a trapper but isn't it illegal to set a conibear on land? I thought that they had to be at least somewhat underwater. I see these mostly in the spring beaver trapping time, are they used for other things? Great info I hope I never see it happen though.

-Duckster

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Dave S

I am not a trapper but isn't it illegal to set a conibear on land? -Duckster

I believe this was brought up before and the answer would still be NO.

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duckster

I haven't been following the whole issue but I saw the latest post and it looked interesting. The reason I asked about setting conibears on land is that the original poster said that these conibears could be found on dry land. I thought that I was missing something.

I have a couple of dogs and go on alot of walks so I appreciate the info.

Duckster

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stumper

Most states regulate that Conibears 8 inches or bigger are water sets only.

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duckster

Thanks Stumper, makes sense now.

Live in the far north and mostly see conibears in the spring for beaver and they are the bigger ones. Have not seen any used on land.

duckster

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BLACKJACK

Most states regulate that Conibears 8 inches or bigger are water sets only.

Last week while brushing my two 70 pound labs I slipped their collars over there heads and measured the inside diameter - 6 1/4 inches. With bait behind it as a lure, their heads would easily go into a 220 connibear trap that is legally set on land.

Then last weekend, killing time at the in-laws, I went to a sporting goods store and looked at a 220. I couldn't budge even one of the springs with both hands.

If you're in an area where they set these type of traps, better have a rope and know the instructions.

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FCspringer

OOps I posted in the other thread on this. Great photos, And what was just said about the fleet farm is a great idea. But there can be many reasons you could not do it. Those things get tangled and stuff, so unless you put it in the proper position, you will never sqweeze it.

Many people cant even then. But many of you will be able to, even without the rope, if you can set them easy, as can I with your hands, it saves even more time. But you need to find out first hand trying it weather you can, and practise it several times before you learn to do it efficiantly.

I would be happy to set up a demo at a Banquet around Alex if theres one coming. Whats the winter meeting about that was talked about, PF?, PF meetings would be a great place for people to learn. Bottom line is you need to learn this hands on. Not the first time in the field with a kicking dog. You can do it, weather you need a rope or not, you can do it.

It is a rare event as I stated in the other post, and also keep it in mind that trappers are important in the big picture for managing preditors for disease and nesting birds, we could use more people doing it. As the fur market crashed many of us are not out doing it any more, I havn't for years now. Even in the hay day when there were trappers around every bush, it was very rare to catch a dog. They put traps in locals mostly in areas to avoid people and disturbances to there traps. They are smarter then people think when it comes to that. Places near creeks, bridges, abandon farm yards, near culvert areas in ditches, ect. Keep an eye out for any signs of a great small game path near corn fields in ditches ect. Rarely do they ever trap public hunting areas. Thats just too over run by people, but some do. They will quickly learn that the odds of success are far less where people freequent. Traps get sprung or stolen and it becomes a waste of time.

I have never ran into one in a public hunting. I have seen a few guy's in them. Mostly rat and mink trappers. There are many wooded public grounds that may be more apealing to a trapper. But ditch areas near culverts and creeks is a likely spot, and very common. I avoid the areas near creeks and culverts, and have never ran into someone elses traps while running my bird dogs. You can almost bet at a abandon farm someone has asked to set traps as it is a great spot for coon.

Most of these 220 sets with boxes or pails ect., are being used for coon. So where you think alot of coon are, stay out, because trappers know that too. But if you think about it, places where coon freequent or live, are realy not the best of bird hunting places, hence the rare occurance. I would worry more about lightning or a car crash. Most offten it will be in a wooded area, near a creek, a culvert or a abandon farm. Junk pile areas ect. And no it is not ileagal to set a 220 on land. A 330, yes. Those are for beaver. 220's are prety much all set for coon, 99% of them,Inever ever caught a fox in one, skunks, cats, and coon. 110 or 160's for rats and mink, and these will most likely never be encountered by a dog because they are placed in even more remote areas, like in the water, bank holes or runs in cattails near bridges farmers back sloughs ect. most trappers like to be able to drive, and not have alot of walking for each trap, or they would get nothing done.

If you ask the land owner if theres a trapper you can be aware and avoid those key areas, which you would most likely do anyway, but at least you know. And be carefull around ditches in those key areas as well, and you will most likely never run into one. But I still recomend you learn from someone how and practise, if you don't, all we tell you is of little value.

Do not count on anything I said, it is best to be informed and prepaired. Some trappers will stray in areas that most of them don't.

So get out there,and be informed. let me know if I can do something In My area of Alexandria MN to show people and I will. FCS

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BLACKJACK

I think the key, like you mentioned, is to be very careful in spots where its easy for trappers to access - road ditches, paths in cattails by roads, culverts. I almost learned that lesson the hardway, one of my labs snapped a connibear trap in a cattail run by the road, luckily all she got was a bloody nose. Nowadays my dogs go on heel once we get close to roads.

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JConrad

Thanks for the great post. I also live in the Brainerd Lakes area and am very concerned about my Griff getting into a trap. I am going to put a rope in both my vest and hunting coat because you just never know. I will also check out the traps the next time I am at Fleet Farm to become familiar with tham.

Thanks again for the information.

What is the meeting that you guys are talking about?

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FCspringer

Thanks for the great post. I also live in the Brainerd Lakes area and am very concerned about my Griff getting into a trap. I am going to put a rope in both my vest and hunting coat because you just never know. I will also check out the traps the next time I am at Fleet Farm to become familiar with tham.

Thanks again for the information.

What is the meeting that you guys are talking about?

Next time I come up training I will bring a couple and show you how to do it. if you are who I think you are.

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jkcmj

I was out running my coon hounds along a corn field and we were watching from a distance as the dog raced right behind a small raccoon. Suddenly the coon did a summersault and the dog caught it and grabbed ahold and began shaking it vigorously. All we could hear is growling and clang, clang, clang! Turned out to be a conibear set in a coon trail that went in and out of the corn. I laugh about it every time as I recall the condition of the coon when we left it for the trapper! Poor guy likely didn't bother skinning that one out!

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jparrucci

Well, as we get closer to the hunting season this topic has come back to the front of my mind. Is there somebody who has knowledge of a large conibear who can in person show me exactly what to do? I live in Forest Lake, but would be willing to travel just about anywhere in the metro if thats what it take to learn in person and get to practice exactly how to free my dog. This might be something a number of us are willing to do, maybe a HSO get together!

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Jackpine Rob

I'd be happy to pick up a conibear at Gander and show you how.

robmaki(at)msn.com I'm in Forest Lake as well.

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hightower

Could a good pair of lineman wire/cable cutters cut thourgh one of these conibear traps?

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Eric Wettschreck

No

Bolt cutter maybe, but no way a lineman plier will cut it.

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401TE

Great post...buddy brought up conibear traps yesterday so I've been doing some research and I'll definitely bring a length of rope in the woods with me. Question regarding bolt cutters...I'm a musky fisherman and have a good pair of Knipex cutters that can easily handle any hook. Would they be worth carrying as well?

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