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best hunting dog


sharpy

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i am looking for a dog for mostly pheasant hunting and some duck and grouse hunting. i dont have that much money and i really want a puppy. any one have any for sale around the 150 mark? the dog ive been loooking at most is the pointing labs. thanks

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I would say for $150 you'll have a tough time finding a dog. Even if you go with a rescue dog most of them have a $150-$250 price tag and you'll be hard pressed to find a puppy.

If you want to go with a reputable breeder of any hunting breed you'll be looking at around $400-500 minmum and on up to over $1000 for some breeds.

I would say you'll have the best luck finding a "relatively" inexpensive lab. They are just more common and easier to find. However if you want one with champion blood lines you'll find they aren't so inexpensive.

If you are really set on a dog and have a limited budget I would look at some rescue programs. Although what you save in money you'll more then have to make up for in increased training as it may have some behavior issues or atleast it will likely not had any hunt training in the past.

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I got my 100% purebred with papers lab, both parents hunt for $150. No behavioral issues, she's been a great dog. Its not what you pay for its the time you spend with them that makes the dog.

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Maybe I was looking in the wrong place. But I guess I wasn't really looking for a lab when I was "dog shopping" either.

Did you get your lab as a puppy from a breeder?

I know when I was looking for a Vizsla breeder the breeders in Wisconsin or Iowa were a little cheaper then around the Twin Cities. So I do think location plays a part in the price.

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i got mine from a local guy who breeds choc, black, and yellow. I knew a few people who had his dogs and i've had 3 more freinds buy and they all have turned out excellent. im just not into spending $600-$1000 on a dog, then another $600 to have a stranger train them.

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Yeah I understand that. I am paying more for my new vizsla then I ever thought I would. I know I could find a lab cheaper and I did think about it but I was really drawn to the vizsla and the cheapest I could find was $800 but I ended up paying more then that. I still can't believe the wife went along with it. In the end I just looked at it like I am purchasing a member of my family that will be with me for the next 12-15 years that made it easier to spend the $$$.

I still plan on doing most of the training myself. We are doing some obedience classes with him partly to help socialize him but the classes are like $75 for 9 weeks so not very expensive.

Sounds like you found a great place to get a dog. Its nice to have alot of positive feedback on a breeder from people you know and trust.

Not sure about the rules on sharing breeder info but you may want to share that info with the original poster. Sounds like a good match.

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If coming up with more than $150 to buy a dog is too much of an outlay, I'd rethink the total cost of dog ownership. Heartworm, frontline, vaccinations, food and the occasional vet visit are probably close to $750 a year or more. $150 is extremely cheap for a well bred dog. I do occasionally see Labs for sale for cheap, but these are typically back yard bred dogs. I'd rather buy from a reputable breeder with a proven line. How many folks do you know that have labs with bad hips, hearts, allergies, seizures etc. I know quite a few. I'd rather deal with an established breeder with a proven line who will stand behind his animals. Taking care of a dog that your family loves that has a ton of health issues isn't worth a cheap initial purchase cost to me.

I'm not directing any of this at Crothmeir. I'm not doubting what he has to say, but I will say that it's not typical. Most people putting out a well bred dog from good lines are getting a lot more money for them.

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no offense taken. just sharing a good experience I've had, i would have paid more for a dog, but i knew what i was getting and was comfortable with it. there are some people out there who breed for the love of the dogs, not to make thousands of dollars.

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I got my 100% purebred with papers lab, both parents hunt for $150. No behavioral issues, she's been a great dog. Its not what you pay for its the time you spend with them that makes the dog.

A good nose and lots of drive dont hurt none neither

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That is a good point.

You'll likely spend far more then $150 the first year you have the dog just on vacinations and vet trips. If you plan on getting the dog fixed you'll need another $200-300. And the dog still hasn't eaten yet.

The fact of the matter is you can get a great dog alot of places and it doesn't always need to be expensive. But the cost of care is the same no matter where you get the dog or how much you pay for it.

The one thing you should look for anywhere you get a dog is health certification. Hips can be a big problem so make sure the family history is clear of any issues and make sure to get a guarantee. Most reputable breeders offer atleast a 1 year health guarantee.

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Dogs are not cheap. Remember all the costs that go with dog ownership. Shots, Vet bills, vacinations, illnesses, food, flea and tick control, neutering, etc. The initial expense of the dog is minor in the grand scheme of things. The first few years seem to be the worst with everything you need to do.

It is hopefully a 12-15 year return on investment, and is one of the best things you can do. Please remember to do your research. There are some very poor breeders out there, and a dog with hip dysplasia, poor eyes, or another easily determined genetic disease should not be in the lines period. This will be even more critical if you are trying to stay at the lower end of the price range of dogs. See the parents, hopefully see them hunt, see their papers and hip and eye certification, and then bring him home.

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no offense taken. just sharing a good experience I've had, i would have paid more for a dog, but i knew what i was getting and was comfortable with it. there are some people out there who breed for the love of the dogs, not to make thousands of dollars.

i think the key is knowing what you are going to get from a breeder. I looked at alot of breeders before finding one I liked. It wasn't cheapest breader around but it was the right one for us. Cost really should be less of a factor in the decision when picking out a dog/breeder I think. Its more about being comfortable with the breeder and confident in knowing what kind of dog you are going to get. That can be done for $150 or $1500.

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its been said on this site several times before

the best hunting dog is the one you have, and the one you have worked with. If it does what you need it to do and you are happy than thats all that matters regardless of breed.

I know others have chimed in about the cost of owning a dog. If this is going to be a hunting dog also think about what it may cost to take your dog to the vet in the case of an emergency while out in the field. Calling the vet on a Sunday when the office is usually closed and your dog has had a nice run in with a barb wire fence can get get really expesive really fast.

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When considering your budget, make sure to factor in month to months costs as others have mentioned. My lab just finished up his first year and with two minor injuries from hunting (barbed wire ripped up his shoulders and the webbing in his foot was punctured), plus regular vaccines, checkups, etc, and I've spent over $1000. Add in a decent food ($1 per lb or more) and that's another $360+ per year. Then there's treats, chew toys, crate, bowls, training equipment, e-collar, etc.

Given that, I think it's worth it to spend a bit more up front so that know about the pup's parents, that you know their health history, and that you know they've been well bred.

Even a free dog is not cheap.

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I have gotten every dog from the Golden Valley Humane Society. All 3 have been pheasant hunting machines. My Lab "Hunter" he came with that name has been fantastic. He came with the 200.00 adoption fee. Lots of labs at the humane society, not saying that all are perfect but take your time and spend a lot of time with them and you can get a good idea of the attitude of the dog. I could not be happier.

I was going to get a purebred from a breeder, but i promised myself that i would donate whatever i spent on a dog to the humane society. Ended up finding my perfect dog at humane society anyways.....

Just my 2 cents....

Picture of Hunter

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In the big scheme of things, money should not come up when picking the right dog for yourself. Obviously budgets can be tight and spending more than able to does not make sense. There are plenty of quality dogs to be bought at reasonable rates these days.

I do have to say that for the most part, the contacts I have had with reputible breeders, have got to the point they are at by having one common goal for their particular breed, and that is to help improve that breed. I am sure people out there may misunderstand this but I have spent a large amount of money on dogs and small amounts, and I have gotten similar in return.

But I will say I am much more comfortable now, considering the genetic problems with dogs ranging from hips, elbows, eyes, eic, etc., with doing some research and ensuring that a particular breed will continue to have as little health problems as possible.

And I can't agree more with some of the posts in regards to if you train a dog to hunt the way you want it to, and your happy with it, that is what owning a dog is all about. That in my opinion is one of the most satisfying things in life.

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My wife and I have always went with rescue dogs, they have all been great dogs, only some have had medical issues. I know that any dog can have med issues but I want the best chance that I can that the dog will be with us for a looooong time. So we just went a few months ago and paid some big money on a yellow lab and so far I couldnt be happier. four and half months old and she already has gotten a few pheasant under her belt, easiest dog to train I have ever had.

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im 15 years old! my parents said i buy the dog and they pay for everything elese. so i just need a dog. and my first dog i got was amazing and we got her for free, and my secound dog is still amazing but just hunts with my dad. so the price dosnt matter with the dog its the care u give it.

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I would just start researching breeders for the breed you want and see what you can find in your price range. If you can't find a breeder in your price range then look to the resuce dogs.

It was posted here on page 1 that good breeders at your price range are around you'll just have to look harder for them. But if you do go with a breeder make sure to ask lots of questions to make sure the breeder is doing everything the right way. Once you get to that point just make a new post and I'm sure you'll get lots of info about what to ask. You just don't want to be supporting a cheapo breeder who is cutting corners and not providing quality dogs.

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...so the price dosnt matter with the dog its the care u give it.

You are right, what the dog turns out to be as a hunter is definitely a result of what the owner puts into it. There are a lot of good dogs out there at a wide range of prices. A dog with a stellar pedigree could turn out to be a real dud if it isn't trained while a dog with a modest pedigree could be excellent in the field with the proper training.

It has been mentioned but I will say it again. Paying a little more for a dog isn't necessarily paying for a dog that will be a better hunter, a lot of the time it is paying for a dog that has had the parents medically screened to better ensure a healthy dog. Medical screenings aren't extremely expensive but they also aren't necessarily cheap.

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Dogs are all what You make of them, not someone else. As musher and birddogger I've seen lots of egos in dog breeding. It all still comes down to your relationship and understanding with/of that dog. While I've hunted with some fantastic dogs, one of the best was my first husky. A 75# male Samoyed. That dog had a vengence for roosters. Our Spingers would follow every scent. He'd only perk up on fresh scents. Eyes brightened, ears stood together and his pace quickens. Very easy to read. He'd even stop and look at me if a bird froze in front of him til I told him 'Hunt it up.' Flushed, pointed, retrieved. Plus that big white dog was easy to see and follow even in heavy cattails, just follow the fuz. I'd get him black with mud, by the time we reach home he'd be dry and white again. Oh, he'd follow hand commands in any direction. Haven't had him around for along time now, but Shogun could hold his own running with champion field dogs. Of course he was a fine leaddog pulling the sled too. When sleddogitis took over, swimming to retrieve a duck made his day.

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I agree here with the guy's on the cheap dogs. Most of the time the 150$ dogs have never been tested for heath issues. I stick around 700$ in each dog testing, before they can even become a canidate for breeding. So I my self could not sell one for that. But you may find one some where out there. But if there is underlying health issues in the dog not noticed in pups you may have twice or more the expence at the vet down the road for problems that start poping up, Hips,Joints, elbows, eyes, ect. You could save and get a dog from someone that does the proper checks on there dogs. Pluss get a guarentee in writeing. Alot of these problems have been getting worse over all in many breeds because of the lack of effort by the breeder to pay for the tests. there fore cheeper vet bill and cheeper dog. I believe firmly that you tend to get what you pay for. And there is no such thing as a free puppy. Good luck to you.

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I think going through a good breeder increases your chance of getting a good and healthy dog. That being said the best dog I have ever owned I bought a couple of days after I graduated college. I wanted a dog right away so I opened up the Fargo forum and saw a litter of yellow labs for sale and picked one up. I remember it was from a dairy farm by Mayville. It was probably the cheapest litter of labs in the paper. Since that I have hoping to get another dog like that one but the last two that I did research on and spent good money on haven't measured up to my first one. Not that the last two couldn't learn it just took a lot more effort. My current dog is starting to age and he is basically a freindly pet with no skill or real desire to please. When this dog sees his end I will do some research and spend some good cash up front. I hope I get another great dog.

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