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Paul Waldowski

2nd Annual Fall Frenzy - Oct 3rd, 4th and 5th

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polarsusd81

RR, if you locate a few fish, chances are there will be more in the area. A lot of guys have marked a point and started casting, you wont get the same depth casting as you would trolling 110' back, but a quick switch of lures and you are in the right area. I haven't had the opportunity to do it myself yet but it is a popular tactic.

One thing with casting vs trolling. You are going to need to pay attention to the speed at which you reel in, a lot of times the speed of the bait is what gets em to commit. Fishing bass with cranks, I tend to be a burner so I really have to watch what I would be doing.

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rodmaker

There are times when casting the shallow water works better than trolling.

Remember these fish get pounded up there pretty hard with trolling. Sometimes quiet is better. I've done just as well using lighted bobbers or casting in 3-5 ft.

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Borch

On pieces of structure that I know like the back of my hand I'll troll 2-3 feet depending on wave action. If you find a contact point were fish are hanging then casting will be very effective.

I won't go that shallow on purpose on structures that I don't know well. If it's new scope it out thoroughly during daylight hours.

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mudpig

Do you have to have your own boat for this event? Or are their people that have open seats and wouldnt mind having someone go with?

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Paul Waldowski

Mudpig,

No boat required. We will find open seats if need be.

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dfv87

Borch makes a HUGE point about knowing what the structure is and where it is... A GPS/chips and locators are essential but actually navigating those areas is even more important if you are taking on less than 6' of water IMO.

Reefs in the spring tend to be further from the surface than in the fall and in the dark is not the time to be finding out just how much closer to the surface!

Good luck and be safe!

Dale

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cjac

Keep in mind the lake is still down a couple feet from normal. So, a chip showing 6 is closer to 4 feet deep.

I was reminded of that last year while I was in my skivvies pushing the boat off a rock pile. The Mrs was not impressed... The bruises on the bottom of my feet and the black toe nail that took the better part of 4 months to grow out also stood as reminders! Oops......

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Borch

Good point Cjac. When I was scouting the east side last fall with my GPS chip I looked for reefs that topped out between 6-10 fow. There were fish on the first one I checked last fall.

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PerchJerker

One thing to keep in mind about map chips - they are NOT that accurate for a lot of shoreline contours especially in rocky areas. It has to do with how the maps were made, they basically get on a contour and try to follow it to get the info for the map. They do not go over every inch fo the lake to generate the maps. So in rocky shoreline contours where there's a lot of variation in the bottom there will be a lot of shallow spots that are not shown. I know of several areas like this. Bottom line - if you rely only on the chip for trolling shallow water, plan to hit rocks.

The chips are much more accurate for mid-lake structure and for shoreline areas that don't have a lot of variation.

If you compare LakeMaster chips to Navionics chips you can find areas where one chip shows something the other chip is missing.

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MuleShack

There is a spot out in front of Hunters that is 4-6' but out of no where there is a pile of rocks that will catch your motor. Luckily we found this in the daylight last fall and could avoid it.

Not sure if i can make the weekend, but might come up for the day/night fishing Saturday and would also have an open seat in the boat if i do make it.

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rodmaker

Good point Dave.

If you can check out the areas you want to fish while it's still light out. You can then come up with your trolling pattern by keying in "dummy" weighpoints on your gps. to keep you away from those "hungry prop" eating rocks.

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rodmaker

Jeff,

You havce mail grin

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Team Otter

A good rule of thumb for me, as it relates to water temperature and presentations for trolling at night is:

1. 60 - 65 F, #5 and #7 Shad Raps, #10 HJ's, #7 Salmo Minnows @ 1.8 - 2.2 mph.

2. 55 - 60 F, #5 and #7 Shad Raps, #10 and #12 HJ's, #9 Salmo Minnows @ 1.5 - 1.8 mph.

3. 50 - 55 F, #12 HJ's or #9 Salmo Minnows @ 1.0 - 1.5 mph.

4. <50 F, #12 and #14 HJ's @ <1.0 mph.

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rodmaker

Awesome Post !!!.

A ton of info there. A question I'm sure others will have is when do you use Shad raps VS Salmo's.

I always start with a shad rap, if nothing I change.

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SCONASOTAN

TO - do you use the floating or sinking Salmo Minnows? have you noticeda difference is useing either? Do they have better action than the Rapala Minnow Rap?

thanks

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Team Otter

I use the floating style Minnows because it seems as though I have a little better depth control versus the sinking style. Minnow Raps are a decent option too.

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Team Otter

I forgot to mention that #4 and #5 Salmo Hornets are also a nice option for smaller presentations.

RM, to specifically answer your question, I lean towards Shad Raps or Hornets when fishing rocks or sand/gravel but focus more on the stick-style baits when fishing cover.

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Team Otter

The only hard evidence I have on the theory and/or strategy above is that many of my decisions about what to use revolve around food size. And, in most cases, larger forage hang in cover while smaller forage scatter and roam over sand and gravel flats.

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JohnMickish

You guys are starting to make it sound like if this isn't your home water your in trouble. Any fish in "safe" water or am I going to have to use my buddies boat?

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Borch

No the guys that will be there can give you the updated water levels. Lots of good and safe water to be had. The piece that we had success on last get togther topped out at 3' with most in the 4-6 ft range on top.

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JohnMickish

That's good to hear because I'm not so crazy about fishing in skinny water, especially if its rocky.

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PerchJerker

That's good to hear because I'm not so crazy about fishing in skinny water, especially if its rocky.

I agree 100%. It gets even worse when there's waves bouncing you 2 feet up and 2 feet down. The only point I was trying to make is to not rely 100% on the map chips if fishing shallow, rocky water, because they are missing spots that you will hit if you're not paying attention to your depthfinder and your previous plot trails.

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rodmaker

Dave,

Rocks and fiberglass boats are not a good combination. Even with the previous boat (aluminum) I had a hard time getting myself trolling in 3-4 ft of water.

I still like the idea of getting out there a few hours before dark and finding an area and put in "dummy weigh points" to keep yourself from those "hungry rocks".

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hanson

If you get pretty familiar with a reef, its really no big deal. Some of the rocky shorelines however can be quite interesting with lots of points, humps, and contours that cut back on you as well. There was one area I was trolling last fall following that 5-6' depth range and all of a sudden the depth came up to 3' then 2' and I couldn't steer my way out of it. The contour pretty much reversed itself aways and I had to backtrack to find my way out of that inside bend. Just a little spooky bouncing around in 2-3' of water over rocks in the waves. My GPS has these areas marked out now with waypoints and obviously my memory remembers a bit about them as well but there is no map chip that will show you stuff like this. Gotta find it on your own.

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Team Otter

Lots of fish in skinny water with no rocks nearby too. wink

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