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Bait caster Vs. open face reels


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I have a question that may sound very novice but I will ask it anyway. I have been raised a walleye and panfish fisherman and I have always used an open faced reel. I am taking a musky/northern fishing trip with my in-laws so I thought I would get a bait caster for the trip. Why are 95% of all open face reel/rods held in your right hand and 95% of all bait casters held in your left hand? Is there an actual reason or is it just tradition?

Thanks,

Mike

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If its your first time using a baitcaster, I wouldn't suggest using one, especially on a vacation. If you have a larger rod and some heavy line, you'll be just fine.... baitcasters are great because of the wenching action when reeling in, and are better casters once you get to know how to use them, but they can really turn in to a big ol' birdsnest really, and I mean REALLY easy if your not experienced using them.

I use a left handed bait caster, and they are hard to come by, but they are out there. I just cant reel with my right hand. It baffles me.

I'd say stick with the open face and set it up with some heavy line (firline,powerpro) and you'll be sure to have a good trip.

I think the reason that most are right handed is because A. most people are right handed.

and B. because on a musky rod, they usually have a longer base to them that most times gets tucked under your arm as you hold the rod above the reel, while cranking with your right hand...

that makes sense to me.

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You may find out about being all thumbs or not enough, there of. You can get both right and left handed bait casters, I guess it comes down to what you are used to using. I spin with a left handed retrieve, I baitcast with a right. Just be sure to practice up before you go, casting into and out of the wind and with different sized lures. Wouldn't want the inlaws to chuckle at you:) Next, a stiffer spinning rod of sufficient length and heavier spinning reel will do just about everything the baitcasters will do. We fish salmon on big spinning rods and reels and it can be easier then using some of the levelwinds and such. Bottom line, if you are comfortable with a spinning rod and reel then use it. You may tire of throwing and cranking bigger stuff though, that is the downside. Left versus right? Well, it just boils down to preference I guess and what type of casting you do.

Tunrevir~

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I have also never understood why most baitcasters are right handed. I mostly use spinning gear and crank with my left. Apparently I hold a hockey stick left handed too. I am not left handed though. I feel like an uncoordinated idiot with a bait caster in my left hand. I had to find a left handed bait caster so I could even function with my musky stick. I guess it is just personal preference and what feels the best, but it would be nice if there were a wider selection of left handed bait casters.

Go with what feels the best for you. If you are really interested in getting a bait caster i would go with a left handed one. It will make the learning curve much easier. Practice and be prepared to deal with backlash (i.e. some sort of hook to pull the line apart, a knife and maybe even an extra spool of line).

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I agree with Joey's comments - Stick with the spinning reels unless you have a lot of time to practice with a baitcaster before your trip. You may end up spending more time fixing your backlashes instead of fishing. I brought a friends BC to the boundry waters thinking it would be easy to figure out. On the second cast I had a backlash rats nest so bad I couldn't use it the rest of the trip.

I picked up a nice used BC and have committed to learning how to use it this summer. Been out using it at least a dozen+ times, I am getting better - but I still get occasional backlash and am not getting as much casting distance as my spinning reel setups.

As for right vs left, I struggled with the same question. Ended up going right handed due to better availablity. It takes a getting use to holding the rod with the left hand after using a spinning rod in my right all my life.

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I use my right hand for all for both baitcasters and spinning. Brother in law always says i'm backwards, but hey, i'm used to it wink

I say get out and try the baitcaster regardless of being on vacation or not, you gotta start somewhere. I know my first cast hit the water about 6ft from the boat and blew up bad, 45 min later I was trying again smile Just throw it high to start, careful with the wind laugh

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I agree with bass thumb, bring it along as well as your other open face musky set ups and use it a little... i mean, your only fishing, right?

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I always cast with my right hand as the main hand! You have to start some time if you want to learn. Any time of the water is great and (as I did for cats this year) you will learn quickly.

The back lash curve is the thing to work on. I never did, but it would be a good idea to cast in your yard at first.

When a back lash happens, never pull to tight out on line from the front of the reel. This will ensure a knot. I have found pulling backwards (towards you) will loosen and then come free. Then pull a bunch of line out the front until you are free and clear. I am using 80lb braid line though, so it is a world of difference from mono.

10-20 cast's, it will start to come natural.

Good luck!

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imho the backlash occured by how u cast, probably too hard, didnt stop the spool, side cast, head cast, lures too light for line diameter. etc... i had been adjustin my castin style and my reel so my advice is loose the brake on reel a lil bit and dont cast too hard when throwin big lures alwyas have thumbs close to spool to control the distance if ur castin against the wind....... last year i had 10000000000000000000000000 backlash this year....only 4..... yup i counted!

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I always assumed it was because a majority of people are right handed and thus reeling more with a bait caster is easier, with a spinning rod there isn't as much reeling, more jigging and feeling the fish, so it would make sense to have the rod in you dominant hand for that. I guess I could be way off.

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setterguy,

You bring up a great point!

I am casting an Outdoor Pro Store 5 once bank sinker, 5-7" bait fish and 80lb braid line.

I know musky baits are large, but I do not think as large as this.

I am right handed and cast from my right side.

I know I am in the minority here though with my fishing.

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Thanks everyone for your responses. I have spent a little time using bait casters but never my own. You guys are right, I need to start somewhere. As I look at a lot of things in my life, you need to jump in the water if you want to learn to swim. I am looking at picking up the Abu Garcia ambassedaur 5600 C4 LEFT hand. Any thoughts on that reel? I want to get some practice time in before the trip but my old trusty open face rod will be right by my side.

Thanks,

Mike

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C4 is good for small bucktail also ideal for jerkbait, topwater to reel in slack of line quicker than c3 although not so great reel for big bucktail with blade #10. Although u really can't go wrong with c3. And just get feel of every reel u had consider buyin it. I made mistake by buy 7000ic3 before get feel of it. Not ssayin its bad reel. Its just not for me.

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