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mallatrout

Mille Lacs Fishing Last Sunday

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mallatrout

We went out of Garrison, tried everthing Rainbows,jigging,waxies and crappie minnows.We had seen a bunch of schools, with some big walleye's on the camera nothing seemed to bite. But next weekend we might try out of fishermans wharf, and go out to big point with the sleeper. Has anyone been fishing over in that area?

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JIvers

I am going to be in one of Fisherman's Wharf sleepers this weekend--we made our reservations before we heard about the bumper perch hatch that is making the bite tough this winter. Based on what I am hearing and reading, I plan on sticking to basics, i.e. shiners on tip-ups and fatheads on deadsticks with green and red hooks at low light, and waxies on bare hooks during the day. If nothing else, I'll catch some of the bazillions of little perch.

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mallatrout

From what I hear, the jumbos are bitting on freshwater shrimp. Two guys near my uncle on big point limited out on jumbos. Using a crappie jig and a freshater shrimp hooked threw the head. I have been to the wharf before, good food nice place. Darren the owner is friends with my uncle. We have always had a good time there when the fish are not bitting..

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shakojdub1425

I am staying at my cabin this weekend so i hope the eyes are biting!!

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alex1

Just wodering where a guy can get freshwater shrimp? Myself and 2 other guys are heading up to the BIG POND on Saturday for a one day trip. Never seen freshwater shrimp in the bait shops in Alex before, and would rather support the bait shops in that area anyways being that's where we're fishing.

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TRZ

I had my shack on big point for 2 weeks and my buddie is still there and either of us have caught one perch on big point. most of the other shacks have moved out of there as well. How deep of water did they "claim" to catch this limit?

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mallatrout

Highway 65 bait has freshwater shrimp and a bait shop in rockville minnesota,wich is a little closer.

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mallatrout

I know they went out of Fishermans Wharf on 4-wheeler and they were in 18ft of water. But They had the camera down seen a couple walleyes. But the perch were very picky and hard to catch on wax worms but they got three, cutt them open and they were full of shrimp.

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eyehunter01

Been on big point for hours! saw only tiny tiny perch! he might have caught his limit of tiny perch but i dont think they were jumbos

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BULLETBOB

Fished Agate bay reef Sunday and Monday with my two kids. They managed to pull in 37 jumbos and lost about 10 or so more. What a blast they had. All day we saw perch on our cameras. Only time we did not have any perch around is when a few pike came in to check out what was going on. We had or best luck for the jumbos from sunup to about 10:30 or so then really slowed down after that for the big ones. We fished in 28ft of water and used red euro larvae on a Fiska hook in color brown. Fished right on the bottom.

Also noticed that they were full of shrimp but never tried using them.

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PLfisherman

bullet bob were you in a rental or your own house. my buddie has a house out off the edge of the reef in 23 feet of water and we didn't get a sniff sat, sun, we saw a lot of eyes on camera but no perch. everyone we talked to said it was a horrible weekend.

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BULLETBOB

PLfisherman,

I was in my own house. We saw all kinds of perch but only one eye for the three days. Lots of little perch but that kept the kids interested most of the day. Headed back up this weekend minus the kids in hopes of getting a few more jumbos.

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Wakemup, I also like them scaled and the skin crispy but hate all of those scales every where so I fillet them with no skin. Cliff I have not heard any news about the City Auto Glass. Pike Bay will be open to fishing. Ice being off of it will be close! Cliff
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    • Rick
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    • SkunkedAgain
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    • SkunkedAgain
      Crispy tail fins!
    • Wakemup
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