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Rainydaze

Llewellyn Setters?

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Rainydaze

Hoping to get a little feedback in regards to Llewellyn setters sp? I'm a long time Lab owner, and used to hunt ducks, pheasants, and grouse. Now I'm pretty much hunting grouse. My Lab was a flat out awesome versatile hunting companion unfortunately is 12 years old, and hips are giving out. I retired him from the field last year. I have considered getting a pointer as much of the hunting I do now is in the woods in heavy cover. I owned a German Shorthair when I was younger in which was a tremendous hunting dog, but too wild as a pet. Chewing through chainlink fences... Does anyone out there have any experience with these Llewellyns or possibly Gordons. I really miss hunting grouse over a pointer. Actually my lab did point often, but wasn't something I trained him for. Thanks in advance for any help!

RD

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Moose-Hunter

Hi RD...

Although not Llewellyn, my experience with Setters has been nothing short of FANTASTIC!! For the hunting I do, I think they are second to none. (So I'm a bit biased... grin.gif ) No waterfowl, all upland with pheasants getting the nod more times than not.

Bow_Dogs_2.jpg

Rosie, on the left. And Lil' Jazz on the right. This pic was taken when they were about 2 years old. Mine are from the Smith line. A bit smaller framed, but that doesn't seem to hinder them in any way. I lost Rosie to complications brought on by canine epilepsy a couple years after the photo was taken. frown.gif It's not common to the breed. From what I was told it happens about once in 10,000+ pups.

For hunting upland game... I'll give them a "9". They hunt like banshees. However, they lack of physical stature can be a slight drawback. At 7 years old, Jazz still has to be put in her crate at times so she won't hunt herself into the ground.

As a "pet"... A SOLID "10". I couldn't ask for a better companion!! Jazz is truly one of the family!!!

Would I go that route again? IN LESS THAN A SECOND!!! This breed and I were meant for each other.

As a side note... Yes, when running both dogs, I did take a few pheasants with the bow!!! Kind of a rush, really!

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jbdragon17

How about a Red Setter? Great grouse dogs...Exceptional family dogs.

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jigguy1

I am interested in any info about the red setters as well

thanks,

mike

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Rainydaze

Hey Moosehunter,

Beautiful dogs! Sorry to hear about you losing one! I know my dogs are part of the family also. Pains me leaving my good old hunting buddy home. I'm pretty sure he doesn't understand. My last 10 years hunting over him have been nothing short of spectacular. Changing gears to a Setter has me excited in a new chapter of my outdoor experiences. I'm not familiar with the Smith line. Those dogs seem to have the nice sleek build for moving through the northwoods. I'm interested! I'm also a bit naive when it comes to the Red Setters? What can you tell me about them? Characteristics... Thanks again!

RD

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jbdragon17

The "Red Setter" is actually registered FDSB as "Irish Setter". Most people in the hunting/trial community call the Red Setters. They are a smaller, shorter hair, hunting/field version of the Irish Setter (Males about 50lbs Females about 40Lbs).

The breed was created by crossing Irish and English setters. What you get is a pure bred dog that hunts like an English setter and loves it's people like an Irish Setter. Best of both worlds as far as I am concerned smile.gif. If you Google National Red Setter Field Trial Club, you will get a LOT more info about this breed.

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Grant Pearson

Llewellyn setters are wonderful dogs. I currently am one my second Llewellyn and have no regrets about them!!!! She's an amazing hunter and is more than willing to go all day long. As with any sporting dog, they will be full of energy, and have clocked mine at over 30 miles an hour at full bore on the 4-wheeler. She, along with my first and all others that I've hunted around seem to know only one speed in the field: afterburners fully engaged. To say full speed would be an understatement for mine. As fast as she is, she's got a great nose, stays close, and holds a point. Also, she's wonderful around my 6 week old son. She will lay next to him and "cuddle" with him or lay next to his crib. Also, if I happen to shoot a duck when I'm hunting (the area I hunt has mixed hardwood with some marshes), she is more than willing to dive in and retrieve it. The one downfall I would say about her is that she feels no pain and can be somewhat hard headed when she knows it's time to hunt. All she wants to do is hunt out in the field. You can call that a downfall, or a blessing. Most of the time, I'm done before she is!!!

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gspman

Quote:

I'm not familiar with the Smith line.


Smith setters are very well known in the field trial world. They are a shooting dog style field trial line. Some of the greatest setter shooting dogs ever have come from the Smith kennels. Destinaire and The Performer are a couple really famous ones. If you have a dog with Smith stuff in it, my guess is it'll turn out to be a decent dog. Smith setters are not Llewellyn though.

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setterguy

Quote:

What you get is a pure bred dog that hunts like an English setter


Well almost.... grin.gif

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jbdragon17

Yes...Almost. Best of both worlds though wink.gif

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MNRandy

[Note from Admin: Please read forum rules before posting again. Thank You]

Randy, be sure to try our puppies for sale forum. I think you will find it works great to sell your pups.

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