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Moose-Hunter

Timer for Diesel Truck Engine Heater?

Question

Moose-Hunter

It's that time of year where plugging in my diesel truck will become necessary. I don't really want to run the engine heater all night. Just a couple hours in the morning before heading out. Is there a timer available that can handle the 1800w to 2000w heater without melting?

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sparcebag

Menards has 120 V AC timers that plug into a recepical,They'll work.

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BobT

Need to check the timer specs. Make sure it can handle the heater amp load. To calculate use this formula:

Heater Wattage / Volts = Load Amps.

This isn't exact but will be close enough for what you're doing.

Bob

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Valv

Moose, I don't think block heaters are that big in wattage. I believe they are only 300w/ or 500w max. Call a dealer to be 100% sure.

2 hours in a very cold morning is not that much to warm up truck. I usually leave mine plugged in all night, in the morning I don't even have to wait for the pre-heater, just start the truck, and water is already lukewarm I can defrost quickly.

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DinkADunk

The factory block heater isn't going to be 2000 watts. You need to buy a heavy duty timer. You'll find them at the Borg and usual haunts. Look for a three prong model. I picked up an Intermec model last night and installed it in my garage. It will safely handle a 10-15amp draw (which is enough). Make sure your extension cord is sufficient too. I run a 50' 14 ga cord, if going 100' use 12 ga.

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hawkeye43

My timer is set to start running at 3:00 am and I leave at 6:30 am. All it is 120v ac that plugs into an outlet. Its luke warm in the morning

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BobT

I have been using a timer on my diesel softplug heater for years. I leave for work at 5:30am. The timer is set to start at about 3:30 and I have not had any trouble getting it started (except when I forget to blend some #1 fuel and it's -20 smirk.gif). I actually didn't need to plug it in for the sake of starting when I first got it in the late 90s but now that it's almost 25 years with about a 1/4 Million miles on it, it's getting a little tired.

Had to put my money where my mouth was once. Traveled out town one year and left it at an offsite airport parking lot. Came back two weeks later to -21 degrees with 15-40 motor oil in the crankcase. Darn thing started but it shook like a bugger.

Bob

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Whoaru99

I use an Intermatic(?) brand of outdoor timer similar to this one.

Been using it now for several years with no problem - as long as you re-set the time after a power outage. laugh.gif

Generally have it set to come on 3-4 hours before launch. Some Owner's Manuals have an time vs. expected temperature chart for the block heater time.

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