• RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
metrojoe

Ground Blind

Recommended Posts

metrojoe

Anyone have any experience with the one man blinds? Is there enough room to come to full draw in the A frame style blind pictured on the right?

p043029sq01.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mnmuzzleloader

would not even bother that style, got one took it out tried and sent it right back, are you going to want something that you have 360 viewing and silent windows. Does any come to mind?? I would either go with teh DB for top choice or I would go with the new ameristeps that offer the new window style alittle less money but we have talked in length on this site about blinds the overall favorite I think has ben the DB!! Hope this helps out!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
orangestew

I have both those blinds and I can tell you there isn't enough room to bow hunt from the A-frame design. I've tried it for bow hunting and you can draw back if you have your back to one of the corners but then you have to be careful not to brush up against the sides when trying to position for a shot. If you are going to bow hunt you'll want the dome shape.

The A frame works well for gun hunting deer and turkey, especially when you are going to sit for a long time because you are able to stand up in it and stretch.

I use the dome shaped one primarily for bow hunting when I need to hunt where I can't use a tree stand and I have had lots of close encounters. Just be sure set up near some good cover so it blends in a little more. You'll also want to wear dark colored clothes when sitting in your blind. Deer will pick up on more movement if you wear your lighter colored camo clothes while sitting in the blind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
delmuts

orangestew. thaks for the info! i have been looking at the cabelas dome one or the ameristep dome.( very similar) i hunt from the ground alot, and hope this would help some. i can't swing the DP. plus the weight would be a problem for me as i carry my hunting clothes in with me in a back pack. do you recomend wearing black when using these? or just stay with dark colors? del

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harvey lee

Del

Some of the blinds have a black inside and then yes, I would wear black. I always wear camo or a darker color which will help as others have stated.

I believe that with any blind you set up and hunt in on the same day is that one should brush it in. This will really help the deer feel more comfortable with the new item in the woods.

I will sometimes hunt out of a blind without brushing it in but that would be a blind that is set up on private property weeks before I will hunt in it. Of course one will need to be sure of the property you are placing it on and leaving it or, you wont have a blind for long.

orangestew is correct in that you will need to wear some darker colors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
metrojoe

Thanks for the info guys. I was doing a little scouting the last day of our annual bowhunting trip to Wisconsin for next year and came across an area that had some great sign but no trees suitable for a stand(well maybe one) I'd prefer to put up a stand but I was considering a ground blind for this location. I've never owned or hunted out of a blind before and it's good to know the A frames just don't cut it for the bow hunter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chucker34

Everyone gives good advice. One of the biggest features besides adequate room to draw and great concealment in my opinion is the shooting windows. You want to have the minimum window space open as possible otherwise it looks like you're sitting in a gazebo enjoying some lemonade. You'll get busted everytime because the deer will see you long before you see it in most cases. For instance, a DB offers a 360 shooting window and easy adjustment. The next best option in my opinion is a hub style blind with windows pretty much all the way around. In this case, try to find a blind like my Big Game Escape Groundmax Deluxe that allows you to silently open and close windows as needed from the inside. I have done this on more than a few occassions when a deer was coming from a direction I hadn't anticipated and not been busted. With many other blinds you would have only been able to open and close the windows with a noisy zippper - from the outside of the blind. So opportunity lost in those cases.

And again, just in general, the darker the inside of the blind and the fewer the windows open the better IMHO. Also, when setting up the blind in your spot, have a friend come along and sit inside with the window openings you want so you can walk around from different angles and distances to see how easy it is to see him.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
woodman

I have the first one and love it. We used it bow and rifle this year. The doctor told my wife that she couldn't climb in a tree stand due to pregnancy, and due in three weeks. So we left the doc. and bought her this blind. We had 3 does within 20 yards of us bow hunting and one fawn within 5 yards running around us trying to figure out what it was. It was funny watching him/her. My dad used it this rifle season and was impressed also. Maybe have to go get a couple more for christmas presents. My review is that they are excellent and you will not be disappointed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jigglestick

just a side note, I was able to find a snow camo cover for the first one pictured, the dog house blind.

I have not been able to find any snow camo for my escape blind.

dont worry, the time will come when we will need it grin.gif

Joe, this late in the season, wal-mart usually clearances these blinds out at like 40% off. I bought a dog house for ...I want to say $40.00? I know I bought the other one even cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harvey lee

Something that I would be a little concerned about with some of these blinds is the coil type that fold up. I have seen numerous coil type fold ups that after time dont work as well as when they were new. The coils seem to lose their tension and they just dont work quite as good as the type that have the X frames for each wall.

I also think that the price of the blind wont affect how close the deer come close to it. They dont know if its a $50.00 blind or a $400.00 but you may after years of use when folding it back up.

Just something else to think about when shopping for a blind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer

I really like blind hunting better than stand hunting. The down side is if there is a lot of brush that you'd be able to see and shoot over if you were up high. But the up side is great. The wind doesn't get at you as much, so you stay warmer, and IMO are less likely to get scented. And beside staying warmer, you can put a very comfortable chair in there. If you're warmer, and confortable sitting there, you'll stay out in the field longer, and are more apt to have success. I can't sit in a tree stand for more than 3 or 4 hours. I have no problem sitting in my blind for 6. Considering I usually get to the stand/blind an hour before shooting light, those extra 2 hours are very significant.

I got busted the first time I used one. I am now more careful to sit in the corner of the blind, and adjust the windows so I have no light behind my head. I've now shot 3 deer in 3 years out of the blind, so it's working for me.

I hunt private property and try to set it out at least 2 weeks early.

I highly recommend finding a chair that doesn't squeek when you sit down or stand up, etc. I just use one of my plastic patio chairs. They're quiet and very comfortable. I even put a blanket in my blind to wrap up in, for the first hour, while I wait for shooting light : )~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chucker34

I use a plastic lawn chair in "permanent spots" like analyzer does. I also feel like my chances of getting busted are less in a blind correctly set up than 20 feet in a tree as I tend to be too fidgety.

And ditto on what Harvey said. To add to that, go to a pro shop or one of the big uns like Cabelas and have them show you how to set up and take the blind down. Inspect the framework and how it's built. I bought a Cabela's one with fiberglass poles, brought it home and when unfolding it - carefully mind you - snapped a few of the poles. From then on I was a big believer in aluminum or metal poles of some sort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Wakemup, I also like them scaled and the skin crispy but hate all of those scales every where so I fillet them with no skin. Cliff
    • Rick
      Two additional open-house meetings are scheduled in the Twin Cities metro area to help people understand and ask questions about Minnesota’s draft statewide deer management plan. “We heard from some who wanted open-house meetings closer to home in the metro area, so we added two to the other ones in the lineup,” said Leslie McInenly, acting wildlife populations and programs manager with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Here is the schedule for the metro area meetings: St. Paul, Monday, April 23, DNR Headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road. Richfield, Monday, April 30, Wood Lake Nature Center, 6710 Lake Shore Drive. These meetings are in addition to 35 others in which Wildlife staff will provide handouts explaining the deer plan and process, and will talk with attendees individually and in small groups. The DNR is taking online public comments on the new plan now through Wednesday, May 9, at mndnr.gov/deerplan. There will be paper copies of the questionnaire available at the open houses for those who are not able to complete it online. All meetings are scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and people can arrive anytime during the two-hour time frame. There will be no formal presentation at the meetings. Minnesota’s new deer plan sets a new statewide harvest target, increases citizen participation in deer management, and outlines ways to keep the population and habitat healthy. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • snagger
      Has anyone heard what they'll do about the City Auto Glass walleye tourney if the ice isn't off by May 19? Even if the ice is off....will they close Pike Bay?
    • Rick
      To help protect Minnesota waters, the Department of Natural Resources is reminding people to properly dispose of prohibited or unwanted aquarium plants and animals. “It’s important for hobbyists, teachers, parents and children to know that they should never release aquarium animals or plants into the wild,” said Heidi Wolf, DNR invasive species unit supervisor. “Some of the pets and plants that live in aquariums are prohibited species that can cause serious harm if released into lakes, rivers or ponds.” The DNR recommends teachers check the prohibited invasive species list before choosing classroom aquarium animals. “We also encourage teachers to discuss invasive species with their students,” Wolf said. People with aquarium animals or plants that are prohibited or that they no longer want can dispose of them at two upcoming surrender events sponsored by Minnesota Sea Grant: Habitattitude Surrender and University of Minnesota Duluth PAWS Event Wednesday, April 25, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Kirby Student Lounge, University of Minnesota Duluth, 1120 Kirby Drive, Duluth. Fish, aquatic plants, invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles accepted. www.seagrant.umn.edu/news/2018/04/25 Minnesota Aquarium Society Spring Auction and Surrender Saturday, April 28, 11 a.m. Lutheran Church of the Redemption (gymnasium) 927 East Old Shakopee Road, Bloomington. Fish, aquatic plants and invertebrates accepted. www.aquarium.mn/announcements/events/auction/spring-auction-2018 Some retailers sell plants and animals that are prohibited in Minnesota. One example frequently found in classrooms, the red swamp crayfish, is causing major environmental and economic harm as nearby as Wisconsin. More information about prohibited and regulated species and what to do with them is available at mndnr.gov/invasives/laws. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Since the late 1990s, Mille Lacs Lake has become an increasingly popular destination for anglers who want to catch trophy-sized smallmouth bass. Until now, it wasn’t known how many of these fish – prized more for their fight than their fillets – called the lake home. A population estimate completed in 2018 shows there are some 67,000 smallmouth bass in the 128,000-acre lake. “This looks like a healthy population,” said Tom Jones, regional fisheries treaty coordinator with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “This estimate roughly represents the number of adult bass in the lake. It does not include bass under 12 inches.” The population estimate would not have been possible without the help of the Mille Lacs Smallmouth Alliance and Minnesota B.A.S.S. Nation. The Mille Lacs Smallmouth Alliance kept detailed records of their catches and provided length and tag numbers from more than 2,100 smallmouth bass. Minnesota B.A.S.S. Nation held several tournaments on Mille Lacs, including the statewide Tournament of Champions, and anglers provided similar data for more than 1,600 bass. “Mille Lacs is the number one bass fishery in the United States right now, and we just want to help protect it,” said Jim DeRosa, president of the Mille Lacs Smallmouth Alliance. “We’re really thrilled that we could play a small part in that.” In 2013, smallmouth bass regulations changed to allow anglers more opportunity to keep smallmouth on Mille Lacs Lake. The move was made to permit anglers to keep some fish during a time when walleye harvest has been restricted or prohibited. During the past five seasons, smallmouth bass regulations have varied, but they generally have allowed harvest of bass under 17 inches. A 20-inch smallmouth bass is generally regarded as a trophy fish. “One thing smallmouth anglers were concerned about was that allowing harvest would mean fewer big bass,” Jones said. “That’s not what we’ve seen with the most current assessment. About half of the smallmouth are over 17 inches, and that is consistent with what we’ve seen in past assessments of Mille Lacs smallmouth.” In 2016 and 2017, Mille Lacs Lake hosted the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year Championship, and in 2017 Bassmaster Magazine named Mille Lacs Lake the best bass fishery in the nation. “We recognize Mille Lacs is a world-class bass fishery, and we’re committed to protecting it,” said Jones. “Now that we have a good estimate of the abundance of smallmouth bass, we look forward to working with Minnesota bass groups and the Mille Lacs Fisheries Advisory Committee this summer to discuss potential long-term regulations.” While Mille Lacs has long been known for walleye, the growth of the lake’s smallmouth bass population is a fairly recent phenomenon. During the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, smallmouth started showing up in DNR assessments more frequently. And anglers were hooking more of them. “When fishing pressure increased in the late 1990s, that’s when we decided to protect smallmouth bass,” Jones said. “We thought the population was fragile at the time.” From 2000 to 2012, anglers on Mille Lacs were limited to one bass over 21 inches, and a very small number of fish were harvested each year. The DNR’s first assessment of Mille Lacs smallmouth bass in 1999 supported the decision to restrict harvest of smallmouth bass, but a 2009 assessment found smallmouth bass in much higher numbers and in a much wider portion of the lake. Though anglers have been allowed to keep more bass since 2013, creel surveys indicate that interest in keeping bass is low. The average number of bass kept each year is about 2,800. In recent years, anglers have caught and released more than 125,000 bass. “Based on the estimated number of smallmouth bass in the lake and the number that anglers catch each year, it’s clear that these fish are being caught more than once,” said Tom Heinrich, DNR area fisheries supervisor in Garrison. “The anglers who are releasing those bass are helping maintain the lake’s incredible bass fishery.” Bass season on Mille Lacs opens Saturday, May 12. Prior to Saturday, May 26, all largemouth and smallmouth bass must be immediately released. Beginning May 26, the combined bass possession limit is three, with only one bass over 21 inches. All bass 17 to 21 inches must be immediately released. More information about Mille Lacs Lake can be found at mndnr.gov/millelacslake. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • SkunkedAgain
      I saw Wakemup mention the whole scaling vs filleting panfish debate, so I'm starting a new thread. Who here cuts out the walleye wings for a tasty bonus? I learned about it the other year and was impressed when our sturgeon guide cut out the walleye wings on the non-slot walleye we brought in on the Rainy last weekend.    
    • Rick
      A new geocaching challenge called the Aquatic Quest, which focuses on plants and animals that live in Minnesota’s lakes, rivers and ponds, is being offered by the Department of Natural Resources. “Geocaching has been an effective way for us to connect people, especially kids, with the outdoors,” said Jennifer Conrad, interpretive services supervisor for the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division. “Not only will this new treasure hunt be fun, it will also help demonstrate that, beneath the surface, Minnesota’s waters are flowing with interconnected life forms.” As part of the challenge, camouflaged containers (aka “geocaches,” or “caches” for short) have been hidden at 74 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas (at all of them except the St. Croix Islands State Recreation Area) and at eight state trails. Geocachers will have until Oct. 31, 2020, to find as many caches as they can. Finding the caches involves entering numeric coordinates into a GPS (Global Positioning System) device, which shows how far away and in which direction to go to get started on the treasure hunt. The clues (aka “coordinates”) to finding the containers will be posted online at 8 a.m., Sunday, April 22, which is Earth Day. People who don’t have their own GPS device can borrow one from one of the many Minnesota state parks designated as a geocaching checkpoint. The checkpoint parks will also offer Geocaching 101 programs to provide instructions for beginners. Upcoming Geocaching 101 programs will be offered: Saturday, April 21, from 1 to 2 p.m., Mille Lacs Kathio State Park, Onamia. Saturday, May 19, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Fort Snelling State Park, St. Paul. Saturday, May 26, from 9 to 10 a.m., Afton State Park, Hastings. Inside each cache is a logbook and a set of collectible cards featuring color photos of aquatic plants and critters. Cache finders are encouraged to sign the logbook and take one of the cards as a souvenir of their visit. Geocachers can earn a special “habitat” card after finding 10, 20, 40, 60 and all of the cards. They also can pick up a limited-edition water recreation card (one each year) when they attend a geocaching or water-themed program at Minnesota state parks and trails. The Aquatic Quest is the fifth in a series of geocaching adventures that have been offered at Minnesota state parks and trails. Previous adventures included the Call of the Wildflowers (2015-2017), the Avian Adventure (2012-2014), the Wildlife Safari (2009-2011), and the History Challenge presented by the retailer Best Buy (2008). More than 11,000 people reported finding a Call of the Wildflowers geocache in 2017, Conrad said. For more information, visit www.mndnr.gov/geocaching or contact the DNR Information Center at info.dnr@state.mn.us or 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays). Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • SkunkedAgain
      Crispy tail fins!
    • Wakemup
      Yeah it was one of those "Oh... duh you dummy" moments when I realized what the problem was this after thinking about it this winter!  Tom- those baits look great! Looking to get into musky fishing a little more this summer and hope to land my first musky on Big V.
    • Wakemup
      Those look good! Now the question is, do you scale them and cook them skin on or separate the filet from the skin? I became a fan about 5 years ago of scaling and leaving the skin on for some extra crisp!