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Dahitman44

learned some lessons

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Dahitman44

Got stopped at a ND DNR checkpoint and that was fine. We were under the limit and I thought we would be in and out.

First off, this is my first "real" Pheasant hunt so we did make some mistakes. Also my first trip to ND and first trip hunting birds more than 20 miles away.

I will make a long story short. First We shot six birds on Sat. and cleaned them. Next shot one Sun am early -- cleaned it and ate some B-fast. Next shot two later in the day and kept them intact to show the kids.

We got our stamp at the post office for Ducks and we were told that was all we needed by the post people. My buddy shot a nice blue wing teal and was going to take that home too.

The DNR guy looked at our papers and said fellas, we have a problem. He explained to us that we had the federal stamp but not the ND state duck stamp. We explained that "mabel" at the post office said that was all we needed and he read us the riot act on it but went on with our other problems.

We cleaned the early sun am pheasant and they "talked" to us individually for 1/2 hour. Two different guys and compared our stories. they said, "isn't it possible you shot that one last night too -- stuff like that." and "Why didn't you clean these two."

I know what they were getting at and what they were doing. They then asked to see my knife and it had feathers on it and dried blood.

We did not clean the birds right either and that was dumb on our part. We did not leave ID on the birds. Honestly, did not think of it.

They said we could have been fined $450 each for the teal (he shooting and me transporting) $200 per pheasant (didn't know if they were hens or roosters) and $500 for the "seventh" bird.

In the end we each got a $25 fine for not cleaning them right and $50 fine for not having the right duck stuff.

I was a little mad, but thopught we got out of there better than we could have.

What experiences do you guys have? There were like 9 guys there with guns -- it was a little freaky.

I think those guys that were all drunk and over their limit that were next to us were in deep trouble. Maybe that's why they let us go easy?

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LABS4ME

Quote:

I was a little mad, but thopught we got out of there better than we could have.


Hit... you were a little mad? I don't know how mad can even work into the equation. I think relieved would've been a better emotion! I think you should rethink your emotions.

1st off, ALWAYS read the state(s) you are hunting in regulations... KNOW THEM WELL! It is your responsibility as a hunter. Second the regs for ducks is the same there as in Minnesota. The Post Office only sells the federal stamp. Third the regs. on cleaning birds is fairly universal... I know every state I've hunted in has the same regs., so it should've come as no surprise that they were gonna read you the riot act.

Quote:

There were like 9 guys there with guns -- it was a little freaky.


I think I would be freaked out doing my job checking out guys who were toting guns and I didn't have one.

Quote:

I think those guys that were all drunk and over their limit that were next to us were in deep trouble. Maybe that's why they let us go easy?


Count your blessings! You're probably right... that may indeed be the reason you got off easy. Now you know why they have 9 guys with guns too... for groups like this!

In the end you are right... chalk it up to lessons learned. Time to move on. The DNR trusted your story(ies) and gave a VERY LENIENT fine to the both of you, more or less a warning. Remember to check all regs. for each and every state and species you intend to hunt. When hunting, ignorance is NOT bliss!

Sounds like a good 1st trip to ND, and a good 1st pheasant hunt. Tweek a little of your methods and your 'stay' at the checkpoints will be quick, friendly and to the point.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Dahitman44

Labs --

Don't get me wrong, they were 100 percent right and so are you. We did feel very fortunate and we did learn a lot of good lessons.

I was not comfortable able not having a state stamp but the lady was so sure -- I should have checked it -- no question about it.

I thought it was strange that they questioned us about the seventh bird so long, but I can see their point. If we sht it on Saturday we would have been over.

Those guys were in BIG trouble. We heard a little about it and they were getting mad and they were pretty drunk. Two had booze in the cups as well.

I can see why they need so many guns, I guess.

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Down2Earth

I would have to agree with labs. It's the responsibility of the hunter for the regs. That being said the DNR in SD and ND need to show the out-of-state hunters and fishermen a little more respect. If it wasn't for us most of them wouldn't have a job, businesses would close, etc.

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LABS4ME

I only met one SD warden with a chip on his shoulder... most have been at least professional, if not amiable. But you are correct, many of the ND guys do carry a chip for non-residents! I guess I just let them 'strut' their stuff knowing that we are legal and make it as quick as possible. We remain respectful and offer no more or no less than they are asking. Usually we are gone in a matter of minutes. One of my buddies got pinched for no plug in his gun when pheasant hunting a few years ago... again, it was his lack of reading the regs....

Good Luck!

Ken

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Dahitman44

Earth --

I have to give them credit they were respectful to us but I was surprised that they "talked" to us so long and kept checking our story.

I guess that is their job -- I guess some people lie to DNR officers. confused.gifwink.gif

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JDM

I think you were lucky that you only were fined what you were, especially on the ducks. I wouldn't complain. It is up to you to know what you need to do. It could have been ended a lot worse for you financially and possibly the confiscation of your equipment. As you say, you learned some lessons.

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2 DA GILLS

Now you have me wondering about some hidden requirement that I can not find in the regulations.

Quote: "The DNR guy looked at our papers and said fellas, we have a problem. He explained to us that we had the federal stamp but not the ND state duck stamp."

I can not find anything about a ND state duck stamp being required or offered on line when purchasing a license. Here is what it states about license requirements:

Nonresident Waterfowl Licenses - All nonresident duck, goose, swan, merganser, and coot hunters must possess nonresident waterfowl licenses. Nonresidents may purchase only one waterfowl license per year. Nonresidents hunting only waterfowl do not need a small game license.

Here is the text about license fees and requirements:

Nonresident Waterfowl License (zones), General Game and Habitat License, and Certificate - $100

Are you saying there is something more required in the form of state duck stamp or is that covered in the General Game and Habitat License and/or the Certificate?

This is the only thing I can find about stamp requirements and this reads as if it is a Federal Duck Stamp:

Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp - No one age 16 or older, including landowners hunting on their own land, shall hunt, kill, or take ducks, geese, swans or mergansers without having in his or her possession a federal migratory bird hunting and conservation stamp (duck stamp) for the season and validated by his or her signature written across the face of it in ink.

I can not find where it talks about a state duck stamp being required????????

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Dahitman44

Those DHR regs -- Don;t get me started. they leave them kinda vague in both states. I think they do that so officers can use their own thoughts on situations -- I just don't know.

It can be a little frustrating... Especially when you screw up like I did, trust Mabel at the post office in Jud and not look up the regs myself.

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Tom7227

If you look under the section "Licenses" on the North Dakota Game and Fish web site you will find:

"Non-Resident Licenses

Fishing, Hunting, Furbearer Certificate - $2.00. Required of all licensed anglers and hunters.

Fishing License (16 or older) - $35.00. Not required of a person under age 16 if accompanied by a licensed adult, except for paddlefish.

Husband/Wife Fishing License - $45.00.

10-day Fishing License - $25.00.

3-day Fishing License - $15.00.

Paddlefish - $7.50.

General Game and Habitat License - $13.00. Required of all hunters, except furbearer.

Small Game - $85.00. For upland species such as pheasant and grouse.

Crane Permit - $5.00.

Trapping License (Reciprocal) - $250.00.

Furbearer & Nongame License (Fox and Coyote) Only - $25.00.

Nongame License - $15.00. For prairie dog, skunk, rabbit, porcupine, ground squirrels.

Deer Bow License (valid for any whitetail deer) - $200.00.

Deer Bow License (valid for any deer) - $200.00.

Pronghorn Bow License - $200.00.

Waterfowl (restricted to zones) - $85.

Waterfowl (statewide) - $125.

The complete book of ND regs is not very clear, but as others have said, it is the hunter's responsiblity to know what the rules are. Relying on someone in the Post Office probably isn't the best idea.

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Dahitman44

Tom --

100 percent correct. Poor Mabel -- Hope she doesn't post on this site. wink.gif

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