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1st gun


Sandmannd

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Hey, I'm just getting going on hunting. I know, old to start but thought it would be a great way to get more outdoor time. I'm pretty much done taking hunter safety. I'm wonder what is a good shot gun to start with. I can't spend a ton of money so used if be nice if anyone knows of a good place to find one. I was looking at a Remington 870 but someone at work says pumps are a pain. Just looking for opinions.

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The 870 is a great gun for a starter. It is inexpensive and reliable. I wouldn't start off with a semi auto when you are just getting into hunting. A pump makes you take a little extra time between shots. I would definetly suggest an 870 as a starter gun, that is the first gun I ever owned.

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I would agree with the above poster, he has this nailed. The 870 is cheap and very reliable. Good luck!


What they said!

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+1 to all the other responses, look at benelli nova's as well. My first gun was a beretta over/under (great deal at the time) and then I bought an 870 the next fall. I started later in life as well, almost 30, but it has been a blast so far

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  • 'we have more fun' FishingMN Creators

The 870 is a fine shotgun and could do you well for your entire hunting career. Once you get proficient with a pump you'll have the spent shell ejected, a fresh shell chambered and fire the second round just as fast as anyone shotting an auto loader. If you buy used, don't buy a 30" full choked shotgun. You'll want a vented rib and choke tubes.

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Look for the 870 Wingmaster instead of the 870 Express. It is lighter, swings smoother and will not rust like the Express. Also, the Wingmaster looks alot nicer with the gloss finish instead of the matte finish of the Express.

It is a little more expensive though.

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I think the 870 is a great gun. That being said I would go right to an auto. Check out the Stoeger. It is a good gun and won't break the bank.

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My first guns was an Rem. 11-87, and it broke withing the first year (a weld in the ejector broke). I then bought a Benelli Nova because the budget was tight. I have had that gun for as long as I can remember, it has been dropped in the mud, in the lake and in the bottom of the boat, and still shoots like a champ. The great thing about the Nova is that there is minimal matinence. I still use the Nova as my duck and deer gun. I bought a Slug barrel and it is really a great all purpose gun. Personally I would go with Benelli or Beretta you won't regret it.

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I was looking at a Remington 870 but someone at work says pumps are a pain


I am curious as to what your buddy says is the "pain" part of a pump shotgun? The pump part? I'm with Surface Tension, once you have experience with it, it fires as fast as any other gun. All guns require maintainence, but in tough conditions a pump will almost always work. Auto's are a little more finicky without the proper care.

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I was handed my first gun in 1978. It was a used Remmington 870 Wingmaster. I still use it.

I have many other guns but the one that has worked the best for me is my old faithful Wingmaster.

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[

I'm with Surface Tension, once you have experience with it, it fires as fast as any other gun.


This is completely untrue. Just ask Tom Knap. He doesn't set records with his Pump.

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I have a remington 870, its a good cheep reliable gun, good starter gun also. As for speed of a pump, come on people, its the first shot that counts! Its not how fast you can unload your gun without aiming! I hunt in southern MN and in northern Wisconsin, I can tell you after that first shot, the other 4 that get fired off in less then 2 seconds didnt hit anything it was suppose to. I hunt with an auto most of the time, but a pump is a good reliable gun, and the 870 is a very comon dependable gun.

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As for speed of a pump, come on people, its the first shot that counts!


Right on.

Not to pile on, but I love my 870 Express. I'm probably going to get another one with a camo finish.

I've shot ducks, geese, pheasant, grouse, dove, pigeons, a turkey, and very soon a deer with this gun. This little number will never let you down, won't break the bank, and can be broken down and put back together by a chimpanzee. No wonder its the most popular gun in the history of shotgunning.

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ok let me re-phrase. For the everage weekend Joe/Jane doing some bird hunting a pump is as accurately fast as an auto. Yes, you can squeeze the trigger faster with an auto, but to fire, absorb the recoil (pump sslides back, shell ejects) re-adjust the bead on your target (pump slides forward, shell loaded), you can pretty much shoot as fast as auto.

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First, let me say speed is overrated. The first shot is the one that matters in almost all instances. Having said that, the auto is faster at target re-acquisition....you can get on faster with your second shot because there is no movement involved.

Remember that first shot though, that is the one that matters. If you want some free advice, do this. Buy a pump (Browning makes a good one too) and put only 1 shell in it. Do that for the first year or two depending on how many times you get out. When you get to the point that you rarely miss and you have instilled good shooting habits, go ahead and fill it up. A couple years after that, you can decide if you wanna jump to an auto. The habits that only having 1 shell instill in you are crucial to becoming a good shot. Also, I recommend joining a trap league. Practice, practice, practice is how you become good.

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I am not trying what so ever to start and argument and never do. All advice on these forums is great advice. Some times to good of advice.

My, second, third and forth guns were pumps. I was a king at sporting clays. I have a natural knack for this. I trained in on pumps and got very good with them. I started grouse hunting with pumps. I never had much, if any luck hunting for grouse with pump. I will also state I did not have dog at that time either. I had got my first auto 4 years ago and at the same time brought my dog into gear for hunting. I have had a great last four years in gunning down grouse. When useing an auto for grouse, the first shot is 50/50, second is70/30 the third shot rolls out to around 40/60. I feel the only way I can even get a third shot in is with auto. My pump, the second was it. I stay more focused on game (one less thing mind thinks about) and over all have done much better with auto. I would never trade auto for pump. I bring pump as back up, but that is it.

Now starting out in field, a pump gun is great. It has a little learning curve, better mastered from the start, rather than leanring down the road. They are very reasonable price also. I would say (and it would be my boys first gun) the single shot to start, bolt action or pump next and then an auto. This is not rule and what has worked for me in my life.

Good luck!

P.S.

Down to earth,

Do you know Tom Knap? I have gotten to know him now over years and he is a good guy. A big talker, but nice guy. I see him around town once and awhile.

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Shack,

I've met and talked with him 2 times. Once at game fair and once at Denton I believe. I would also like to state that I never said a pump wasn't a good gun. IF you READ my posts on this thread I have stated that. I'm just saying it's not as fast. Yes make the first shot count. Why give the person asking advise false information? Someone stated pumps are just as fast as autos which is untrue. The Tom Knap reference was because he uses both a pump and an atuo in his shows. He can shoot more clays at one time with an auto then a pump. If a pump was just as fast he would have proved it. Plus I'm also sure he's aiming and not just pulling the trigger.

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I now shoot an Super Black Eagle and love it. But my first gun was an 870, my second gun was a Browning BPS, and my third gun is the SBE. By starting out shooting pumps I think it trained me to make dang sure the first shot counts and if the second shot is needed manually cycling the chamber gives me that split second to reorganize my thoughts, pick up my target, get my lead and the speed of the animal again and squeeze off the second shot.

I know when I have kids or if of my friends would decide to get into hunting I would really strongly push them to go with a pump intially until they feel they have shooting down to an art. In the case of kids they don't have a choice especially if I am buying it for them!grin.gifgrin.gif

Just how I learned and my .02

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Sandman,

Somtimes I kind of forget the main point of a thread.

1st Gun!!!!!

I will stress a point I made in my previous post. I feel a first time, out of the box trap shooting/hunting newbie should really think about the single shot crack barrel. It was my true first gun. It is lite, easy to learn, feels good in ones hands and is dirt cheap. My father bought my first one for around $40.00 brand new in box. This really gives a major meaning to the "first shot", because it is the only shot. Plus if you never hunt again, you are out only $40.00-$90.00, instead of $150.00-$300.00. Plus if you never go hunting again, it is a nice home protection gun for the novice. I would not rule out the single shot when starting from any age. Millions started on them and upgraded quickly or in the case of my father and uncles, still use then to this day.

Again, good luck

wink.gif

A little info on a first timers gun!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Some more info on guns!!!!

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If one went this way. Just make sure it isn't one with a hammer. I have an old single shot 20 with a hammer and it has to be one of the most dangerous guns out there.

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Sorry to hear of this!

The gun that was bought for me is a very safe gun. At first my father had me hunt with barrel cracked (right out of gun training) and I never hunt with hammer cocked. Never had an issue in the couple years I used it. It was bought new and kept it in great condition (as it was my first gun). I still have it and will give it to my boy next year for gun training.

If one buys or gets a poor condition gun, there could be safety issues in that gun. You bring up a good point of buying a first gun “used”. Have gun checked out if purchased used. Just food for thought.

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  • 'we have more fun' FishingMN Creators

"ok let me re-phrase. For the everage weekend Joe/Jane doing some bird hunting a pump is as accurately fast as an auto. Yes, you can squeeze the trigger faster with an auto, but to fire, absorb the recoil (pump sslides back, shell ejects) re-adjust the bead on your target (pump slides forward, shell loaded), you can pretty much shoot as fast as auto. "

BINGO! Harmonica Bear is right on target. I'll further that weekend Joe to the accomplished hunter as well.

We were talking about a shotgun to hunt with not exhibition shooting. Huge difference so lets not hunt for reasons to disagree.

Heres Tom Knapp and his

10 clays in 2 seconds. Just think a limit of grouse in 1 second. smirk.gif
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Sandmannd-

I just won an 870 express at a PF banquet last month. If you are interested I will cut you a deal and save you a few bucks. I don't need another 12 gauge. Just a thought.

ww

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I just bought a benelli SuperNova (advantage Max). Let me say, that I think that it is a good gun. I'm going to use it for geese and turkeys. However, in terms of pumps. I like my winchester 1300 much better. The benelli is different from all my other guns and it takes some getting used to. I do like the gun, but it has a hard trigger pull and some creep in the trigger. I found myself flinching with it shooting trap (you don't notice the trigger pull in hunting situations and I never flinched this year shooting geese). I shoot a lot of trap a year with multiple different guns and it is the hardest to get used to shooting. For a pump, it has some quirkiness to it, nothing major, its a great gun, but different than an 870 or 1300, which are plain jane workhorses. If some of you guys have both, you might know what I am talking about. I also have one autoloader, its a beretta AL390. In my mind, it is one of the best guns ever made. It is the most reliable gun that I have, I like it so much that I'm only going to start using it for trap and pheasants. This might sound week but I don't like taking it out in the foul whether anymore, its starting to show some signs of a lot use and I plan on keeping it as a family heirloom to pass on to my son. I am everybit as deadly with my second shot with that gun as I am with the first, and yes, I can rattle it off faster than any pump. I know guys that are awesome with both autoloaders and pumps.

One nice thing about pumps is that they are almost always fail proof. I've had some automatics that were pretty finicky with types of shells and definitely cold weather. I don't know if you can beat a good pump gun. Don't think I'm ripping on the benelli, if I didn't think it was a great gun, I wouldn't have bought it. I'm just giving you my honest to goodness opinion of it. Good luck with whatever you buy. Practice with it as much as possible, get out and shoot some trap while you still can. I had some cousins that used to hunt, they'd pull their guns out the day before deer season and couldn't hit the broad side of a barn.

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"I had some cousins that used to hunt, they'd pull their guns out the day before deer season and couldn't hit the broad side of a barn. "

I wonder if I had the same cousin!

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Sorry for posting again, but I just do not see any reason for stating the hammer operated single shot shotgun is “dangerous”. This is the most widely used and most popular gun in American hunting history (IMO). If the hunter/shooter is properly gun trained and gun is in proper working order, there should be no concern. Unfortunately, a mishandled, poor condition and poor working order gun in any situation is “dangerous”. I did some major searching on internet about “most dangerous shot gun” and really came up with nothing.

I would think one would have some info to back this statement up. I can not find anything. I have found many statements and articles about how the single shot shotgun is a great 1st time gun, but nothing about an on going ban or the gun being of any danger to anyone, unless used improperly. May be that was the case in your guys situations. I do not know.

The only gun I have in my collection, which I will not fire and consider dangerous is my MossBerg 20ga pump. It was my second gun I had and first gun I had bought my self. I learned a lot after buying this gun about what to look for in a used gun. It had been heavily used with no maintenance. The breech had a hair line fracture in it. I learned the hard way. I how ever will not say the “Mossberg 20ga Pump” is a dangerous gun, because I have no proof of the other million guns that are out there being dangerous.

Sorry for the rant, but when someone attacks an American Icon like single shot shotgun, I figure someone should defend this gun. I started out on this gun and my boys will start out on this gun. Its a right of passage! They are a safe gun. Ask a gun smith! They are sold at every gun store, sporting goods store and more.

Click below to read about the single shot shotgun being a good first timers gun!

Scroll down to break barrel section and please read!

Below is the only derogatory information I could find ont the internet about the singe shot hammer shotgun

Quote:


As practical for hunting as the single shot and double barrel shotguns are, they fail to measure up in the personal protection arena (with one exception: Any gun beats no gun during a gunfight). Since a good self-loading (or ‘automatic’) shotgun will cost almost double the price of a good pump action shotgun, I would recommend the purchase of a pump action as being the best value for the money.


The gun below is the single shot hammer operation shot gun and is sold widely threw out the World. I could not find any info it is a dangerous gun!

0001063303120_500X500.jpg

Last but not least. One would have to throw double barrel hammer operated shotguns in this mix. I know of a couple hunting buddies that would defend this statment if it was brought up when out hunting. grin.gif

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Guns are made for the purpose of killing. The firing mechanism is designed to be operated by the trigger finger, yet many men seem to forget that any other object pressing on the trigger will explode the cartridge. Some of the hammer guns can be discharged by some objects pressing on the hammer, as in cocking, and then releasing the pressure before the gun is fully cocked. As a young man, I was well aware of this danger, having visited one victim of such an accident and having heard of several other cases, all of which had been caused by the accidental discharge of the old hammer shotguns. Since these were shotgun accidents, I assumed that my rifle was immune to such incidents. The hammer could not strike the firing pin unless the trigger was pulled, even if it were released before reaching the full cocked position.


web page

Click to go to article

Also found one more pamphlet from the DNR, warning about the use of Hammer Shotguns for beginners. Read the section on first shotguns

DNR pdf on first guns

I'm not a computer geek, but it took me 3.2 seconds to find this article, they are out there. Maybe the new guns are better, but I still don't feel that it is a safe as having the firine mechanism enclosed in the reciever, Just my ops.

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