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Down2Earth

Over/Under Question

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Down2Earth

I have seen a couple of guys are looking at getting one and many people own one. But I just don't understand why. I'm hoping for some reasons from the people that own them or want one. First they do look cool. Second, the more guns a guy has the better. But I can't even count the number of times I needed that 3rd, 4th, and fifth shell. Every time that happens I think to myself "what the heck where you thinking about buying that O/U". Because every time I look at new guns I think of pulling the trigger on one but never do.

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fishwithteeth

D2E,

All you need to do is shoulder one and all the questions get answered cool.gif As with shots 3 through 5, I find I shoot just as many birds as my companions with autos, and I shoot a lot fewer shells at the end of the day! I used to shoot autos, and sometimes still do, but even waterfowling I now find myself using an o/u. So go ahead, pull the trigger, buy that new o/u. Remember, "Guns are like tools, you can never have too many" smile.gif

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zamboni

U do realize they are quicker at squeezing off 2 rounds than both pumps and semi-autos, right? Alot of people (like my dad) won't own a semi-auto because of jamming as well. I prefer O/U during sporting clays, trap doubles, and even pheasant hunting as well, because of the quickness

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2 DA GILLS

I am one of the guys wanting one, see my thread asking for advice. I have multiple reason for wanting one.

1) I have a semi auto and want something different. I will probably still use my semi auto for ducks, but with ducks you only get 3 shells anyway. So, I am only one shot short with an O/U.

2) O/U are known for being well balance and swinging very nice. Fun to shot.

3) When hunting pheasants (what I really want the gun for) I rarely get more than a couple shots and the MN limit is 2 roosters. Why would I need more than 2 shots. 2 shots = 2 roosters. Ok, maybe not.

4) Hunting for me is more than the number of birds in the bag. If I miss with my 2 shots, I should have shot better. With the O/U, I can break the gun open, rest it on my shoulder and stroll along watching the dog and waiting for a solid point.

5) I spend a fair amount of time hunting pheasants in North Dakota and you are required to plug your shotgun (3 shell maximum) even for upland birds. Again, only one shell shy of the maximum I am allowed.

The last reason is like you mentioned. Can you own too many guns?

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Down2Earth

Like I said before I really like O/U and have thought many times of getting one. But here is one example of many I could give. Last year an O/U would have been fine here in MN. But in years past (mostly hunting Public Area) I walked all day chasing up many hens. Then at the end of the day dog goes on point again and up jumps a rooster. First shot was to quick and I missed and got it on the second. Right after I shot it a second rooster gets up and I get him with the 3rd shot. Those are the kinds of situations I'm talking about. Where if I was in the field with an O/U I'd be shacking my head and calling myself a name or two. For trap I think they would be great. I only hunt waterfowl in Canada and I wish I could have 10 rounds in the gun. My buddy sailed a goose and went to get it. In the mean time a flock of a 300 or so came into the decoys. When it was all said and done I shot 14 out of the flock. 3 shells in the gun and reloading as fast as I could. It was like they thought the dead ones falling out of the sky were landing. I also hear your point.....YOU HAVE TOO MANY GUNS....what do you mean sweet heart? I NEED each and every one. grin.gif

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2 DA GILLS

One person shooting 14 geese out of one flock? Snows and blues I am guessing?

I understand your pheasant hunting scenario, but for me personally. I could live with not getting the second rooster if my gun was empty. The dog probably gets more irrated than I do with missed birds.

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Down2Earth

Quote:

One person shooting 14 geese out of one flock? Snows and blues I am guessing?

I understand your pheasant hunting scenario, but for me personally. I could live with not getting the second rooster if my gun was empty. The dog probably gets more irrated than I do with missed birds.


Thanks for bringing that to mind. My dog would probably bite my leg off for making him work all day if my excuse to him was, "I only had 2 shots". (Which should have been enough):D If it was just buying one of the cheap O/U I would own one...but I would have to have a Browning. Not that they are better then the next, but it's just my brand of choice. Maybe I'll just keep waiting to win the one at PF.

Yes it was Snows and Blues. My buddy came back and said he couldn't believe what he just saw.

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kentuck_ike

I can reload my o/u way faster than my auto

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fishwithteeth

I also hunt WMA in MN and some private land in IA. I usually don't hunt alone, so if by chance I miss wink.gif, it gives my partners a rare chance grin.gif. I use an auto for goose hunting in CA and turkey hunting MN, just about everything else is done with a o/u. In fact, I am now looking for a 28 ga. o/u for grouse. If you have the disposable income, I would by one. You won't regret it.

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charliepete2

Reasons to buy an o/u instead of a pump or auto:

1. Two chokes...you can have an open choke for the first barrel and a tighter choke for the second. For upland hunting this will put more birds in the bag.

2. Balance...o/u's are neutrally balanced in the middle of the hinge pins, pumps and o/u' are more stock heavy. It takes more to get them swinging. o/u's are also much shorter even with longer barrels because of the short reciever.

3. Simplicity...when you pull the trigger on an o/u it goes bang...even my high dollar Benelli's jam once in a while.

4. Ease of cleaning

5. Ease of collecting empties....I'd rather not litter the landscape, but I'm not digging through snow.

6. Safety...when you break open an o/u it's pretty hard to accidently shoot somone. It's also easier to inspect the barrels if you have a blooper shell or shoved the barrels in the snow.

My shooting improved when I finally made the switch to an o/u. Being able to taylor the chokes and having a better handling gun made a big difference for me. When I pull the trigger I expect something to fall. On good days I don't have to clean the second barrel. Shooting an o/u teaches you to wait for the good shots, instead of emptying your gun on the marginal ones.

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fishroger

Those are good reasons. I have both an o/u and auto. Bought a benelli M 2, 2 years ago for field hunting. Dinged up nice wood on the o/u. I patterned the new gun and it was shooting high so I shimmed it and it was right on. 2nd time I used it in No. Dak. I got a triple, never had a triple or even a double before that. Thats one advantage over the o/u. 3 shells-3 birds. Got a double the next day, missed first shot, connected with the next two. Couldnt have done that with the o/u. I do like my o/u, but its my backup now. I do like its ease of cleaning. The m2 did jam once in no dak., it had a piece of straw stuck in the action.

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Down2Earth

Fishroger, Good point! I do tend to take the road less traveled on the Publice areas i.e. cattails, willows, places that put a toll on a guy and his equipment. I would hate to ding up that $1000-$1500 O/U.

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Jarrod32

Reasons to buy an o/u instead of a pump or auto:

1. Two chokes...you can have an open choke for the first barrel and a tighter choke for the second. For upland hunting this will put more birds in the bag.

This is a very nice advantage to the O/U...and put #6 shot in the first barrel, and #4 shot in the second...

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Down2Earth

With all the reasons i tell myself not to buy one....I found myself looking at them the other day. I want the Browning but was thinking that if I decide I don't like it that's a lot of money down the drain. So I looked at the Stoeger line on sale for $300. That way if I don't like them not a big loss....and if I like it I'll just pass it down to my 6 month old son and buy a Browning. One thing that I noticed was it didn't have the automatic ejectors, but for $100 more you can get it with them. Is this a must for those of you that have O/U's. I'm also contemplating the Remington SPR310, Mossberg Silver Reserve, Tristar Hunter, and the Vega Diamond.

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LABS4ME

Take it from someone who has bought the cheapie O/U's, they don't compare to the better made ones. Save up and buy your browning. You will NOT be disappointed... 99% guaranteed! And even if you are disappointed, you will not be out any money as you will darn near get what you paid for it. The cheapo's do not hold there value at all. I myself have the Mossberg Silver Reserves, and they are O.K., but not even close to my Browning, as far as quality and balance, good not great. My buddy was looking at a Stoeger, myself? I didn't like the balance, but I especially hated how bad the wood was.

I prefer the ejectors... some guys don't. Personal opinion.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Down2Earth

Dang you Labs! Now you got me thinking even more. Say I buy the Browning and really like it. My guns take a beatting walking through the cattails, willows, etc. What I mean by not liking a O/U is the 2 bullets. So if you say the cheapos don't hold thier value. What is the going rate for a used Stoeger if it only starts out at $300? The other ones a mentioned are in the $500 - $600 range. What are their used values. Maybe I should go that route and find a used one to see if I like them. Plus you say if I buy the Browning I will get my money back. But I personnally would never sell a gun. Sounds like you are the same way. I could probably trade in all the used guns I own and don't use and not have to pay a dime for that Browning O/U.

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2 DA GILLS

Down2Earth,

Not sure if you have followed the other topic that I had started about the same subject. I was considering the Mossberg Silver Reserve and some of the other less expensive models. After about 2 weeks of looking and shouldering guns. I have decided that if / when I purchase my o/u it will be one of the higher quality brands. Once you handle a few of the models from Beretta or Browning, you really feel the difference. I found that most the lower priced models did not fit me. Actually, many of the Brownings do not fit me very well either. Another gun that I am also considering is Franchi o/u. They appear to be $300 to $500 less than the Berettas.

While looking at guns, I had one of the sales guys tell me that I would be better off getting into a used higher quality gun than going with a new lower priced model. Good advice or good sales pitch? I am not sure. I think someone may have stated that on this board already as well. Good luck with your decision.

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Gator Slayer

D2E, a yugo would get you from place to place (the function of an automobile) but a Cadilac is likely a much more enjoyable ride....I have used an 870 wingmaster since I was 12 years old until I was nearly 40. I loved that gun. Then I bought a Ruger red label a few years ago. The way the O/U handles, swings, feels is so much beyond the Remington that I can't explain it. I also found I change my shooting habits on upland game. I how take a second square up and make my shot. With the remington there was plenty of shells so why worry about "form". I've used my O/U in the thickest, nastiest cover, the shorter length is a godsend, yep it's scratched, chipped and even has some gouges in the wood, So what it's not a "Mantle piece" it's a hunting gun. I paid way more for my duck boat but don't hesitate to drag it over rocks or sand. neither are pretty but both still perform as intended. Is your favorite gun the one with no scratches/mars? Mine is a beat up .410 made in '30s that fed my ancestors during hard times....buy a O/U and make an heirloon, you'll never regret it.

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2 DA GILLS

Good point about the duck boat versus the gun. I had never really thought about that way. I can think of some of the things I have done to my truck while hunting and the truck cost me just a bit more than any gun I would consider buying. Plus the truck decreases in value the minute I drive it off the lot.

That settles it. I am buying an o/u. I know this advise was for down2earth, but I am (was) struggling with the same decision.

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LABS4ME

Down to Earth or anyone else. If you live in the metro area and want to meet up with me at the So. St. Paul Gun Club, I will bring a Mossberg, Beretta and Browning O/U and you can shoot away and see how you like each one. That way you should not have buyers remorse... though I doubt that it would happen. Let me know if interested and we can work out a time.

As far as used Stoegers... there is one at GM in woodbury... been there quite a while and they can't get rid of it, even in the high $200's. My buddy was looking at it and got the same advice on "save up for a year and buy a used 'higher end' gun than to settle for a lesser gun now". I say that if you go with a lower end O/U, buy from a large manufactuer (whether they are the actual producer or not) so that you have a company that will stand behind the gun and be there next year and the year after should you need parts.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Down2Earth

Thanks for all the information. I'll take it into consideration. labs I'd love to meet up with you but it's a 3 hour drive. I think I'll just get a Browning. At least if I don't like it I can still say it's a Browning.

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Gator Slayer

D2E I'll be in th Brainerd area opener small game weekend if you are interested I'd let you try a red label on for size. Not mine my wife's blush.gif I think there are a couple ranges in the area that might let you bust some clays.

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Down2Earth

Gator, Thank you for the offer. But I live around the spicer area so that's also a little far. Maybe Mels has a couple used ones he would let me shoot.

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Blaze

It's also a good idea to watch Guns America, Auction Arms, or Shotgun World (google them) for good deals. I went to Dick's, Gander, Cabela's - every gun shop I could find - and tried them all. For me, it boiled down to this: I loved the Beretta's look and finish, but overall, the Franchis Alcione fit me perfectly and shouldered like a dream. Within a month, I found one online in PERFECT shape for under $600. I would've paid double that new at any of the shops above. I ended up also buying a little Browning Citori 20ga from Cabelas a few weeks later for my wife. It was a good deal and I knew it immediately because I had been doing my homework.

Franchi, CZ, and some others also make full-featured guns with a lower price point than the B-Guns. One more thing, my Franchi is WAY prettier than my wife's more expensive Browning!

Good luck & let us know what you decide on.

Blaze

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2 DA GILLS

I was almost going to give up on considering Franchi, but now Blaze - you are making me rethink that. I really want to shoulder a Franchi Renaissance again, but I can't find one locally. Maybe I will find some time this weekend to check out a few more places.

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