Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
grpd

tamarack river

33 posts in this topic

My wife and I will be staying on island lake just south of

northome from June 9 thru june 19 and curious to know if we went to red lake and fished the river beween the bridge or the state campground and say hillman's would there still be walleyes and crappies in the river and if so would you fish for them under a bobber or just jig? thank you for any info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not even one little hint

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The river will slow down but there should still be some fish in the river.I like a floating jig as there are a few snags. Crappies may bite if there in there early in the morning or more towards dark. If you bobber fish for walleye try and get your bait just off the bottom.Will you be putting in at the old steel bridge and floating down from there?From the hwy bridge to the lake would not be much of a float.Couple hundred yards at best.I will assume your bringing a canoe?If you would like me to give you a ride up to the old steel bridge just track me down

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about landing at the public landing by the bridge fishing up river for a ways, maybe to hillman's or farther, i do not know where the steel bridge is, but anyway then just floating back down to the landing, just was not sure if any fish in the river now or they left for the lake. Also would be in a 16' alumacraft with 40 honda and maybe the river is to low to even take this boat up river, not sure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will be fine with your boat, there should be plenty of fish in the river to entertain you, it may slow abit, but you will catch some. I took my 115 hp 18ft boat up the river past the steel bridge a couple weeks ago, plenty of water.

Good luck, enjoy the fishing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a boat and motor the lake will be the place to be. Watch for one of those calm windless days and enjoy the lake while your in the area

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you both very much for the information and cookie thank you for your generous offer of bringing us to the steel bridge, I hope I get to fish the main lake but thought if it was windy or something the wife and I could leave island lake for the day and go up the tamarack and fish, i was from the public access to the state campground but never fished it or gone any farther, I have read in these forums so much about going up to the steel bridge that I am looking forward to seeing it just so I understand what the locals or river users are talking about

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

...I hope I get to fish the main lake but thought if it was windy or something the wife and I could leave island lake for the day and go up the tamarack and fish, i was from the public access to the state campground but never fished it or gone any farther, I have read in these forums so much about going up to the steel bridge that I am looking forward to seeing it just so I understand what the locals or river users are talking about


grpd, the easiest way to see the steel bridge is to drive across the next time you're in Waskish. You'll have difficulty launching your boat anywhere near the bridge, without permission.

I am probably misreading your posts... but if it is too windy to fish on Island Lake, it will certainly be too windy to fish on URL.

If you then decide to fish the Tamarac River, you'll probably find some walleyes... but the odds are, they will all be over 17". You might find some sheepshead and northerns... Crappies, probably not...

If you feel the winds will keep you off of Island Lake, why don't you consider trying for walleyes and panfish on Seretha Lake or Dark Lake, both near Gemmell? At least you'll be able to keep what you catch in those small lakes.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks deja vu for the info, i am saying if to windy to fish island i would fish the tamarack and was curious as to any fish in it this time of year, was not sure if it got real low or what but does sound like fish in it, the steel bridge i have no idea where it is at, all i know i have read posts about it but the only bridge i know is the one by the landing so i was hoping to run up river and see it, would not know how to get there by road

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The steel bridge is a smaller bridge about twenty minutes by boat up river, not to be confused with the "highway bridge" that is by the landing. The steel bridge is somewhat of a navigtional marker as it is just about the end of deeper water in the river. Once past the bridge the river starts to get smaller and shallower and another mile up river it becomes almost dangerous to try and navigate with the current low water conditions. Not to crash any fancy thoughts but the steel bridge is just that, an old steel bridge with wood pilings and a wood deck, not a real eye catcher unless you are into bridges and swallow nests.

Look in the deep holes between the mouth of the river and the steel bridge and you should find some fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took the boat to the last of the deep water a little past the steel bridge it was good fishin and a nice trip.And yes there are a couple swallows under the bridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How deep is 'deep water' in the river?

I haven't been up there--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

...the only bridge i know is the one by the landing so i was hoping to run up river and see it, would not know how to get there by road


grpd, many years ago there was yet another logging railroad bridge, or trestle, that crossed the Tamarac River several miles upstream from Waskish and the current Highway 71 bridge.

You can still easily drive to within a quarter-mile of this old logging railroad trestle, using the Lost River state forest road and other connecting state forest roads that have been recently improved by wild rice paddy operators. The Lost River forest road intersects with Highway 71 about halfway between Waskish and Kelliher… You need a good map or detailed instructions to travel these roads and visit this site.

You have to walk that last quarter-mile on the old railroad grade in order to get to the location where the trestle actually crosses the Tamarac River. (If you’ve used Google Earth, or one of the many other mapping programs, here are the GPS coordinates for that old trestle: 48 degrees 09’ 49.05” N, 94 degrees 22’ 58.43” W.) The trestle foundations are still standing…

A team of macho adventurers, wearing permethrin-treated clothing and with DEET lotion applied to neck, wrists and hands, could carry a canoe along the old railroad grade from the rice paddy road to the old trestle foundations, slide the canoe into the headwaters of the Tamarac River, and paddle and pole their way down the several miles of winding river to the public landings near the Highway 71 bridge. I have no doubt you’d see many interesting birds and animals; if you made this trip in early May, you might well see spawning gamefish.

Such a canoe trip would require serious planning and equipment review. If the water levels were high, the trip might be completed in a few hours; if the water levels were low, however, the trip might well degenerate into hell on earth…

The Waskish Chamber of Commerce should investigate sponsoring a multi-canoe event… call it the Tamarac River Wilderness Canoe Race. Schedule it for the weekend before the opening of walleye season, and have the local resorts and businesses sponsor canoe teams in the initial event…

Visualize Jeff and Cookie as a team representing Agassiz Lodge, Doug and John representing the state park, the Petrowske’s, father and son, representing Hillman’s… other teams representing West Wind, Hudec’s, Mort’s, Rogers, et al…

Start at the dock of the public launch site just west of the Highway 71 bridge. Have the contestants run to their pickups, each loaded with their canoe, and drive south on Highway 71 to Lost River forest road, then east and north to the old railroad grade. Unload and carry the canoe along the old railroad grade to the headwaters of the Tamarac River, slip the craft into the water and paddle and pole as fast as possible downstream, to finally be greeted by a crowd of loyal supporters at the dock of the public launch site just west of the Highway 71 bridge…

Minnesota’s answer to Alaska’s Iditerod? I can hardly wait! cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

the Petrowske’s, father and son, representing


The Petrowskes would represent the Petrowskes and travel that region in the same style boats and methods the Petrowske family used 80+ years ago. You guys can have your canoes and paddles, we know what goes on in those parts...we will have motors, case of bug spray, anti itch everything and a small arsenal of good firearms, the critters are hungry and could very well mistake dangerous humans as harmless upright steak. There is a good reason locals wait for a hard frost before heading into those parts.

As for the question about depth in the river; during normal wind conditions you will have seven foot holes and 4 foot flats past the bridge until you get to what some call the river meadows or end of the trees then it averages one foot straights with three foot holes on the corners. If you get through the meadows you come into patches of hardwoods along the river standing out of the surrounding bog country, now you have super shallow water, downed trees and very busy beavers working in the hum of a million mosquitoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

The Petrowskes would represent the Petrowskes and travel that region in the same style boats and methods the Petrowske family used 80+ years ago.


OK, we've got one team onboard, only need 3 or 4 more. smile.gif

Don't hold back, cookie... You and Jeff would make another great entry.

Shouldn't be difficult to persuade the Waskish Chamber to open up the watercraft type to square-stern sportcanoes, jon boats, inflatables... powered by paddles, oars, poles, even an outboard?

But remember, the Sierra Club will have monitors along the course, to insure that the racing teams do not totally destroy the beaver dams as they pass by...

Maybe a chain saw should also be allowed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did a hunting canoe trip a couple of years back. It was quite the adventure but my old tired body could not handle that trip/race.I have made that trip on sled and many chain saws would be needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like sort of a short trip to me...

For a true adventure, try putting in at the headwaters of the Lost River where it starts north of Gemmell. grin.gif

We tried going through the Lost River snowmobile trail in the summertime once with an Argo. We got about halfway through, and got hung up on a log. (the machine was actually sort of floating and churning through the muck up to that point) That's when we decided to turn around...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

For a true adventure, try putting in at the headwaters of the Lost River where it starts north of Gemmell.
grin.gif


swamptiger, if you can pinpoint the source of the Lost River you should be famous... smile.gif like Schoolcraft, who allegedly discovered the source of the Mississippi.

Quote:

We tried going through the Lost River snowmobile trail in the summertime once with an Argo.


I used to hunt grouse on the first 'island' on the Gemmell pit side of that trail. I actually was able to drive in with a 4x4 and a small boat on a trailer last fall, to the first open water, just before the 'island'. Like cookie, decided I was too old for that adventure. Hell turning around, but I got back out to dry land without getting stuck.

The 'pine islands' are probably my favorite part of Minnesota.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

I actually was able to drive in with a 4x4 and a small boat on a trailer last fall, to the first open water, just before the 'island'.


Last fall was probably about as dry as it ever gets in there.

The actual source of the Lost River is generally the swampy area near Gemmell, but I know of two main "arteries" - one to the south of Gemmell, and one to the north. The one on the north side is what we refer to locally as "the off-take" ditch north of Gemmell. Follow that, and you will be led into that mysterious area in the bog where the Lost River ends and the Tamarack River begins....

As I said, it would be a true adventure... grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What always amazed me about the Lost River was that the spawning fish have to go completely underground for about a mile to get where they end up. shocked.gif

As far as a canoe trip down the Tamarac? I spent a big part of my life trapping along the Tamarac and I have too many memories of being wet, cold and miserable and with a long walk or boat trip home to go to go back in there for fun. crazy.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear ya...

Back in the 1930s, one of my uncles ran a trapline on skis from Gemmell along one of those drainages out to the bog. When he reached the bog, he turned north and hit the Dinner Creek flowage up by Margie. Then he followed the Dinner Creek drainage back to the Gemmell Ridge and back home - all in one very long day.. Doesn't sound like much fun to me, but I guess those furs were what kept the family going during the Depression years.. crazy.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure glad I inquired about the tamarack river and fishing it, it turned into quite a very interesting topic for me to read, seems like you folks that answered have been in the area for a long time and have lots of history there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

I hear ya...

Back in the 1930s, one of my uncles ran a trapline on skis from Gemmell along one of those drainages out to the bog.


You know, swamptiger, I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you about when the walleyes will migrate to the deeper water in the west end of Dark Lake?

And, have the walleyes fully recovered from the last winterkill on Seretha?

I promise not to pass your information on... smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the walleye population is presently down in Seretha. The lake is presently full of bluegills, bass, northern, and a few walleye.

It took me 40 years to figure Dark Lake out, so - that - my friend, is what I would consider to be classified information.... wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we tried going on dark lake once in the winter by the creek but there was about 150ft of open water dose anyone put there boat in by the creek or do the locals kinda claim it as there lake another thing i noticed was there was a screen in front of the culvert is there trout or somthing in there or are they trying to keep something in/out ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Rick G
      Got one over 40in on a small local lake like 3-4 yrs back , 2lb line...fishing panfish. Got a pic up in the St cloud reports somewhere. But biggest was just shy of 43 on Rainey River about 20 yrs ago
    • Jim Uran
      If you make up it up this way at all I'll have the peg on a good bite somewhere. Sometimes traveling a little farther north makes ice fishing more enjoyable. Keep on posting, we have tons of well educated anglers that roam these forums!
    • Jim Uran
      I'm slacking bud, I haven't done any of that yet lol. The excitement is here though, been talking to some co-workers lately about all things ice fishing. Soon enough guys!!
    • Neighbor_guy
      My troubles are that even with the hyfax on the slides the munchkin take a little bit of a kick to get started.    My sled does not have studs and has carbides on the skis. So when I hook up to the house with the tow bar the track spins without breaking the house loose. It's like hooking it to a truck. Too much power on the sled side and no ability to transfer it to forward motion.    The 4-wheeler with chains has zero problems. Pulls it like it's not even there. 
    • Jim Uran
      I'd like to see this expanded to help revive our pike size and population.