Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
trekker

trailering with electric motor

20 posts in this topic

The dealer told me to not trailer with my Minnkota electric motor on the bow in its holder (in horizontal, stowed position). He said take it off and put it on the boat floor. I see others doing what he said not to.

Opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What reason(s) did he offer?

I do it all the time. I figure it'll get bounced around more in the bottom of the boat than in the holder on the bow. If there is a concern about the control head held suspended there are mounting hardware available to stabilize them for traveling.

Besides, is it any worse to be on the bow while trailering than while motoring across 3' waves at higher speed?

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've left mine on the bow( in the stored pos.) for years with now problems.if yours' has a quick detach mount , then you may want to either paddlelock it( i drilled a hole through the two plates, and used a paddlelock), or store it in the boat. otherwise i see no reason. del

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input.

The reason, from what I recall, had to do with bouncing around more. But yes, it sure would bounce around a lot on the water too. Also, when it is in bottom of the boat, it gets a lot of vibration. I'm thinking I'll give it a try to not take it off. I do have a boat cover that has a special wide spot on the front so the electric motor can be left on the bow under the cover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would totally leave it on. the only time I take mine off is when I put it away for the winter. My cover doesn't fit right with it on. I haven't had any problems with trailering thus far and the only trouble I ever had occured when I took my motor off. Dropping one of those plastic wing nuts and having it bounce to the back of the boat. This led to a long search and rescue mission. Since then, I leave it on.

CA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trekker, what motor do you have? Is it an auto-pilot? If it is, I would take it down. The compass inside does not like to get vibrated and jostled around. It will lose its calibration and the only way to recalibrate it is to bring to a repair shop. Save yourself the hastle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ahh! so that is why i stay with the standard foot control! grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it is an autopilot. What you say about the internal compass does make sense! Thanks for the insight!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last boat (just sold it this spring) had a MK auto pilot on it for about 10 years, at least.

It was never taken down / off. I will say this though, I live about 10 miles from South Center, which is our go-to lake for a Sunday afternoon-got 3 hours to go fishing all of a sudden-trip.... That happens about 6-8 times / year.

Other than that, it got up to the Park Rapids area 1-2 times / year.

I DID put a bungee cord around it, to an anchor mount that I had at the front of the boat, which snugged it up pretty good.

Might want to just look at doing something like that???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a Ram mount to stabilize the top of the tolling motor while in transport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it hard to believe that the motor will be subjected to more vibration and bouncing on the bow while trailering than while boating. Running across the lake has got to be the roughest ride the motor will see and between securely fastened in place on the bow or allowed to roll and bounce around in the boat hull, I don't see much advantage to removing it.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i agree - nothing is harder on anything in the boat than a 8 mile boat ride though some decent waves. auto pilit - humm..... maybe i guess but they all go out anyway. my understanding was once you had it fixed you were good to go - i have owned two ap's both of which went out and both never went out again after the first time. i never take my trolling motor off. it is made to be up there and to handle the abuse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do people always have to argue with me on this site?!?!? I'm just stating facts!!!!! The manufacturer actually recommends taking the motor down WHEN EVER you are not using it, is that a little overboard, yes kind of. But if you must need PROOF that trailering with it is worse than being on the water, come along with me and I will show you first hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think people are trying to argue with you on this one, they are just pointing out that whether a motor is sitting on the bow of the boat, ot laying on the floor of the boat, while traveling they are going to be "feeling the bumps" regardless of their position.

The point about waves creating more of a jarring effect is a pretty good one. Very seldom have I traveled on a road where the road was so rough that the head of my motor was bouncing. I have however witnessed many times a lot of rattling happening up front on those real choppy days. I too run an Auto Pilot up front, and haven't had any problems thus far with keeping it on. (knock on wood) I have no doubt that the manufacturer told you that you SHOULD take the motor off whenever not in use, however most rigs you see going down the road these days have their motor in ready position. So I guess people are taking a chance.

CA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why subject it to extend bouncing. The way I feel is they get enough bouncing on the water why do it while trailering. If I am going a short distance I leave it but on long trips it comes off. When I pull it to town to fuel it I watch it bounce back there that has to put a lot of uncessary wear on everything from the mounting boats to the deck of the boat where it is mounted. To each his own that is just what I do. I figure as much as they cost I might as well take care of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i agree with tom and iff ! if it is recomended for that model.why chance it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert, I wasn't arguing with you. I was stating my opinion based on my experience and I do disagree with the manufacturers that recommend taking it down for the reasons that I have stated. I believe that the motor is subjected to more bouncing and potential damage if it is stowed in the boat hull where it can slide around, roll around, and bounce around while going down the road, accelerating, and hard braking. If it is firmly attached to the bow, it can't do any of these things and it will rarely, if ever, be subjected to the harsh treatment it sees on the water.

In fact, prior to the introduction of the quick release mounts, bow-mounted electrics were permanently fastened in place.

It's my opinion and nothing more.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I leave mine on but if I had the extra room in the truck I'd probably take it off. I do use a bungie around the shaft to keep the bouncing down while on the rode. One thing you should be is slide the collar all the way down to the mount just in case it jumps out of the cradle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bobt - that was the point i was just going to bring up. these quick release mounts have not been around to long. on my current boat the motor is bolted right to the bow with no plate - also per instructions.....

on my old boat i did have a plate and did take the motor off on long trips because i did not have a cover that would go over the bow mount for that boat.

i have never herd of anyone untill this thread taking theres off cause it shakes to much while on the road and may cause hard to the a.p.

everybody has things they do with there own boat that to the next guy just seem silly. if it makes you feel better to take it off the bow - then do so - it only takes a minute. but i will bet you anything if its a autopilot you will be replacing that gyro at somepoint anyway. grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for clarification, quick release plates have been around almost as long as the PowerDrive units. PD's came out in 1986-87. 3rd parties came out with QRPs shortly thereafter. Someone always has a good idea! There was even a few patent lawsuits in the late 80s to early 90s over the design of the QRPs. (not from MK, but between the QRP manufacturers of that time)

MK didn't get into the QRP market until mid-to-late 90's (96?). Why let someone else make the accessory money?

Side note: I am not aware the manufacturer, MK, has ever recommended either way (taking off or leaving on). I think a retailer or salesman may be making their own recommendations here. The 60" shafts have a lot more "head slap" than older motors that were shorter. Make sure you slide the depth collar down next to the drive housing and tighten the tension screw whether trailering or motoring from spot to spot. This is THE safety feature to avoid an accident of the motor bouncing out of the cradle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0