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terrible_fisherman

Question on Slip Bobber fishing

5 posts in this topic

I have never slip bobber fished for walleyes in the open water season and am a little unsure how to go about it. The gear for it is easy enough to understand but more wondering on placement of the bobber and locations to look for on a given lake.

I am wondering if people are commonly using slip bobbers in weed areas and actually letting your bait drop right down into the vegetation? Or is it more common that people are leaving their bait on the outside of these weed areas over sand flats or mud bottoms and just trying to stay somewhat close to the weeds?

I am much more used to trolling or drifting so basically covering more water then I would still fishing. The concept of not moving is a difficult one for me:P.

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Look for some sort of structure, like a point that is not too far from a weed line. Drop anchor, and get the bait a foot or 2 from the bottom, near the weed edge, and sit back. I only have luck at dusk or into the night slipbobbering, but its fun if you have some lit up bobbers and see it taking off under water when its nighttime. grin.gif Plus you have a hand free for your beer. tongue.gif

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Slip bobbering is usually a spot on the spot presentation. Use in a spot you have confidence that the fish are at or will eventually show up on. Like Donk mentioned points, inside turns, saddles, islands, channels, rock piles, etc are common spots. Slip bobbering has other applications as well. For instance I've had excellent result fishing walleyes suspended over deep water off of structure using this technique. As you were thinking fishing around weed beds in pockets or on edges can be effective as well. I usually fish 2-5 ft off bottom depending on the fish and cover I'm around.

Good Luck!

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Like has already been mentioned, structure depends on the lake. One of my favorite spots in a small flat that is really sparse in weed cover. I usually get there early, cruise around with the trolling motor and aqua view and find a couple of spots that have some big weed patches. I back off of those and cast in tight to them. Don't overlook the ability to do it in the daylight. If the wind is pounding the shoreline(especially early in the year like now) don't be afraid to to get in shallow. We had a day on Mille Lacs where we must have caught at least 50 in around 5 fow in the middle of the day! Good luck.

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I agree to most of what others are saying but I prefer to fish closer to the bottom around a foot or even 6 inchs off the bottom.You can bobber fish in the day if the wind is pounding pretty good if you are on a flat fish the side of the flat that the wind is blowing into.It is fun if it is at night with the lighted bobbers.

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