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Gordie

Ban on lead sinkers

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I just seen that Wisconsin ban useing lead sinkers for fishing this year and was wondering if, or should I say when this happens in Minnesota what do you guys think will be a good alternitive. What could replace a 3 or 4oz sinker and be used effectively.I pour my own sinkers and jigheads so I dont think that will be possible to do with steel or even tungstun. I dont like the Idea of useing lead and possiblly killing birds or other wild life.

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I'm pretty sure that the ban stops at 1oz or something like that. So hopefully if won't affect us.....yet.

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I'm pretty sure that the ban stops at 1oz or something like that.


Thats what I've heard as well.

If the ban does include all lead sinkers, thats going to affect downrigger balls, bottom bouncers, as well as our cattin' sinkers.

I think the ban is primarily to protect birds from eating lead sinkers. I guess if a loon can eat a 4 oz No-Roll, we're going to have a problem.

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I think the immediate concern is birds and other animals will accidentally eat the lead. I don't think any animal would try to eat a 4oz lead weight.

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I have'nt seen any regs on the lead so thanks guys for setting a few things straight I really wasn't ready to just throw all those sinkers away and where would you dispose them anyway? supose I could melt them down and make a catfish door stop mold.

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there are tackle exchanges held at places like gander, cabelas etc where they take them.

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Quote:

Quote:

I'm pretty sure that the ban stops at 1oz or something like that.


Thats what I've heard as well.

If the ban does include all lead sinkers, thats going to affect downrigger balls, bottom bouncers, as well as our cattin' sinkers.

I think the ban is primarily to protect birds from eating lead sinkers. I guess if a loon can eat a 4 oz No-Roll, we're going to have a problem.


I would'nt want to get near that loon! grin.gif

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I Use a lot of steel and tungston equipment I recieved a year ago from a takle exchange at gander mountain. I am pretty happy with the jigs I recieved but not so much the sinkers. The sliding 1/2 ones seem good, just not the ones that snap to your line.

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A 4 oz tungsten no-roll would be pretty cool, but it would cost way too much to make it feasible.

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A 4 oz tungsten no-roll would be pretty cool, but it would cost way too much to make it feasible.


If word spread of that we would be getting robbed on the shores of the Mighty Mississippi river.

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